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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/29/17 in all areas

  1. 3 points
    Anddenex

    training for Bishops

    I hope you realize all your questions, at least most of them, can be turned toward the member and not the bishop as well? 1) Why isn't their a standardized training for members on how to approach leadership with difficult situations? (Because it seems to me that "too often" members use counterproductive and non-Christian methods to talk to the bishop) 2) As members, we all represent Christ (Baptismal covenant), and we should all be people who we can trust. The bishop should be able to trust you the same way you expect trust from him. 3) I don't know of any members in the congregation who are required to learn ways of effective communication with leaders. 4) For instance, there appears to be a tendency for members to blame the bishop's or stake presidents for lack of good communication, then to come in with acceptance and respect of the office they are visiting. 5) With how many different opinions there are as to what is right and wrong communication and how to treat people, the leaders aren't going to get it right every single time. How do you know the bishop hasn't been reading books on good communication, tries it, and the member is still upset? 6) Yes, why aren't members required to take a course on how to communicate with leaders, which will help them to communicate with people who are there to "help" with our final judgement? In all my experiences in speaking with leaders (bishops and stake presidents) I only had one unfortunate encounter. My percentage of bad encounters would be below 5%. Since that bad encounter, I have never experienced another. I have also experienced the same people having issues constantly with leaders. The bishop's monthly, will typically meet with the stake president for training. What would be nice is if we all exercised more faith, hope, and charity toward those who serve us and those we serve.
  2. 2 points
    Blossom76

    Vegan Celestial, Omnivore Telestial

    I'm just an investigator so I dont really know what I'm talking about LOL, but when I read D&C 89 I decided to try my best to live it. I eat a small amount of meat once a week (some weeks not at all) and I try to eat all whole grains where possible (brown stuff not white) I also dont eat chocolate or drink soda anymore (I'm terrified of putting any caffeine in my body), I also gave up sugar because I was addicted to it, I don't know if I'm doing it right but I can tell you, I feel the healthiest I ever have and I've lost about 8 kilograms so I'm pretty happy with the health code put forward by Joseph Smith
  3. 2 points
    Blossom76

    The Prophet Joseph Smith

    Hey Grunt, I'm an investigator just like you! I've questioned just about everything! Keep researching fairmormon is a great place to go with questions. One of the best videos I have seen that actually answers the hard questions in a way that no one can argue with is on youtube (even the mainstream christian admits at the end that he can't disagree with any of Pauls points of view). It's an interview of a LDS man Paul Gregersen, I know it will help your testimony if you watch it, he is so well educated, an absolute credit to the LDS church. Here's the link for part one (I think there are 12 or 13 in all - I've watched it so many times - its truly amazing) Anyway I hope it helps you. Blossom
  4. 2 points
    A few years ago on the Catholic Answers Forum he and I had quite a few debates about the Book of Mormon and the LDS church. He told me on that forum that he had decided to come back to church. This was a complete shock to me. We had a few conversations and then I didn't here much until Elder Uchdorf's talk. Right after his talk I sent him an email telling him that it sounded very similar to his story. He wrote me right back and confirmed that it was about him. He is a testament to me that anyone can come back to the church.
  5. 1 point
    Maureen, you are on an LDS board and you already know the answer to this. Give it a rest.
  6. 1 point
    jewels8

    training for Bishops

    Thank you. I'm sure leaders aren't always this way and don't intend to come off this way, but it just seems it would be better if they had a standard guideline in talking to the members. Not favoring one above the other. I'm sure it must be hard to be a leader, but it seems strange that as a whole, they don't have a program to avoid much of the unintended problems that can happen when a person is just wanting some help. I'm really doing fine, just reflecting on a couple times in the past. I apprecitate your concern and caring.
  7. 1 point
    Sunday21

    training for Bishops

    Dear @jewels8. Hi there! Are you having a tough time? Do you want to share? Hugs! Thinking of you....
  8. 1 point
    Grunt

    Missionaries

    Thank you for that. I guess at the end of the day you’re right and I just don’t know. Sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t. My family has faith in my decisions, and I don’t take that lightly. We’ve made spiritual progress as a family though. My wife accepted a blessing and when I asked her if she wanted me to offer a prayer in the prep room before surgery she said yes. It’s the first time we’ve ever prayed alone together.
  9. 1 point
    Jane_Doe

    Missionaries

    I've seen tithing done a number of ways in part-LDS couples. The Lord is a very personal God.
  10. 1 point
    Jane_Doe

    Missionaries

    My perspective is a little different: each person is to follow the Lord themselves. Yes, we take assurance/friendship/comfort from others, but I see the decision to join any church to be a highly personal one.
  11. 1 point
    Grunt

    Missionaries

    I appreciate it. The sisters said the same thing and I know it to be true. Honestly, the only issue is the tithing. In some ways, it's dumb, since I give a decent amount to charity each year, but in other ways, it's a very large commitment. It's a lifelong commitment. That money is children's education, the front porch my wife just put on the house, sports, etc. I'm having trouble taking that from them through MY commitment.
  12. 1 point
    askandanswer

    Missionaries

    I think your family is one of the most important reasons why you should be baptised. The most important reason, of course, is you and your happiness, in this life and the next. Purely speculative on my part, but your decision on whether or not to be baptised might be yet another of those occasions when you may be required to show leadership and set the example, and then wait for "the troops" to follow. Of course, knowing nothing about your family situation I can't see why you would delay taking a step that will so richly bless them.
  13. 1 point
    Jane_Doe

    Married a nonmember

    Previous posters already great answers to this. Again, the key is respect and communication. You need to be all-for-nothing-right-now. In fact, as a person in an interfaith marriage I would highly advise against that. You're both part of this marriage, and you need to respect both faiths. I'll break this down into a few parts. You respecting him and his faith -- You need to love him as he IS, not as a potential Mormon. Do *not* bug him about reading the Book of Mormon or doing anything LDS-y. Respect his choice to be how he is now and love him now. If he chooses later chooses to read or participate, that's fantastic (trust me, I get that desire in my own marriage), but he needs to do it out of the desire of his own heart, not to make you happy. Him respecting your faith - He should indeed respect your faith and by no means forbid *you* from attending or reading or anything else. You have the right to follow Christ as your heart desires. The kids are another conversation. Aunt / Uncle -- they sound great! I'm so happy they've supported you thus far in your marriage. True family love is not based just on a person's faith, and you can indeed continue to embrace them and love them in your life, regardless of which faith path you take. Regardless of your faith path, you can continue to invite them over, go swimming, and have a great time. Same with rest of the family (yours and his). Don't make this about "going to my church is supporting my family and going to yours is supporting your family". Family is family, regardless of faith.
  14. 1 point
    Grunt

    Married a nonmember

    Turtle, I'm not LDS, but I attend an LDS church with my family. Has your husband been to an LDS church? If you're asking him to convert, that is a mistake in my opinion. Just ask him to support you. He doesn't NEED to believe LDS is the true church. It doesn't matter. He can worship in his way AT LDS church. Start small. What time is his church? If they aren't at the same time, ask if you can go to both. Don't make him sit through Principles and Priesthood. Ask if you can go, attend Sacrament, then leave. He can participate in Sacrament. He can even call it communion if he wants. He can do what my family does is not participate in Sacrament. Nobody in my ward says a thing to me. If his service is the same time as Sacrament, ask if you can split the times. One day a month go to Sacrament. Get your children involved in mutual (maybe? I'm not sure what that is, honestly). Ask him to help with service projects. These are all ways you can participate in LDS and still respect his belief. This shouldn't be a "one or the other" scenario. It should be an opportunity for mutual respect and support. Compromise.
  15. 1 point
    Didn’t some leader tell us that we should not prejudge who to invite to church events?
  16. 1 point
    Jane_Doe

    Married a nonmember

    Howdy! I am also Mormon lady married to an Evangelical guy. We have a great family, beautiful daughter, and this has been the happiest 5 years of my life. This biggest thing in any marriage is to have mutual respect and communication. That applies just as much to inter-faith marriages. Have you tried communicating with your husband about the emptiness you're feeling? Have you asked him what his specific concerns with you attending LDS church?
  17. 1 point
    Budget

    Married a nonmember

    I agree with both mdfxmd and my two cents: You can't expect a spouse to be ok with a 180 degree turn after after 12 years. If the situation were reversed and you both were attending the Mormon church for 12 years and he suddenly told you he didn't want to go anymore and wasn't going to - I'm sure that would be a huge upheaval in your life (and honestly, many many marriages have broken up over such). So while it's unrealistic to suddenly turn the table on your spouse and children after 12 years when they are happy where they are; this is where I agree with my two cents. You certainly can attend both. My friend has a similar compromise in her family. It works out very well for the most part and they've been married now for about 24 (?) years.
  18. 1 point
    Vort

    Married a nonmember

    Hmmm. I think I don't quite agree with either of the first two answers. On the one hand, your marriage is sacred, and you are duty-bound to protect it. You have gone along for over a decade, so you can't expect your husband to be happy with you changing course midstream. On the other hand, one's conscience is sacrosanct; any loving spouse understands that and ultimately must support the exercise of it. I think you proceed with much caution, but proceed nonetheless. Help your husband to understand that this is a matter of conscience, of you doing what you deeply feel is right. I don't know, this is tricky territory. Be gentle and loving, but do what your heart tells you is right. That's my advice.
  19. 1 point
    It is a matter of how we see others. My entire life I have been amazed what individuals will do when what they make or can make is on the line. I have a good friend that is a doctor and I am very amazed at the compromises he is forced into every day for his practice and salary. I know another doctor that has moved his practice to Mexico because of what the laws of this country were forcing on him. As an engineer, I helped design and build curse missiles (among other things) for which I was paid much more than the tobacco farmer. Also, it is interesting how much manual labor is required to grow tobacco. Is it better to labor or to be on welfare handouts? It would seem that regardless of what we do – we could have done something better – or there is something that would have been much worse. We can always justify or condemn others on the basis that there are better or worse things. What I am suggesting is that we turn this concept upside down. Consider what we will for ourselves – but for others – think not so much on where they have been or even where they are – but on where they can go and what they can become. That is how we should judge others and how we should encourage them. The Traveler
  20. 1 point
    Those that serve in the military do not make very much – at least I didn’t while I served during the Vietnam era – I made more on the side while serving in the military than what I was paid to carry a M14. As a side note – I have recently read several articles about good LDS kids coming home early from their missions because of depression. When I was called on a mission, I had already served in the military – some of the young men I served with were baptized – some were contemplating baptism and were killed in Vietnam. I faced difficulties on my mission but nothing like the difficulties of serving in the military. My mission was easy. For me – loving others is not so difficult – for me trust is what is what is hard to come by. I can love my neighbor – but trusting anyone is a challenge – especially when they have not yet proven themselves loyal. With this in mind – I am concerned – everyday – if G-d and my neighbor can trust me. President McKay said, “It is a greater honor to be trusted than to be loved.” The Traveler
  21. 1 point
    I do not disagree - What you would do for your best friend or only child – you should do for everyone. Of course, we should not encourage anyone to commit sins but rather to repent and be baptized. What amounts to encouraging someone to repent and be baptized? I personally try to avoid making a list because what is necessary for a certain lost sheep may not follow conventional wisdom – as per what Isaiah looked for in marriage. The Traveler
  22. 1 point
    It is my opinion that anyone that wants a relationship with G-d deserves my assistance. I believe that I am under covenant to do so. Part of my covenant requires me to encourage others to discipline themselves and live by covenant with G-d. Some think that “Christians” should not provide services for a LGBT community event – I am of the other mind – I believe anyone that comes to a believer of Christ – we should accommodate them as we would anyone and everyone else – standing as a witness of Christ. And as long as they are open to us and what we believe we should be open to them. I really do not believe that the LGBT community intends add profit to any business they do not believe support their lifestyle. So, if they come to me I will help. If they do not want my help – then they can choose who they will associate with. One point I would make. It is my experience that anyone with gender confusion that seeks a relationship with G-d will be cut off by those that support gender confusion. If they cannot find friends among the disciples of Christ and are treated instead with scorn – where will they turn and who will treat them with love and kindness? Their old friends will likely wish them dead and accuse them of all kinds of things – their only choice will be to commit suicide or return to old ways and forget trying anything else. The Traveler
  23. 1 point
    MormonGator

    Keeping the Sabbath

    If you need to work on a Sunday to feed your family and pay your bills you should feel no guilt whatsoever about doing it.
  24. 1 point
    The Folk Prophet

    The Prophet Joseph Smith

    It's hard to address specific problems one might have with any aspect of any given thing without the specific details of what's being struggled with. That being said, here's the dealio: And I suspect this is the same-ish answer you've gotten from the missionaries. There is only one way to know if the Book of Mormon is true or not. Only one way to know if Joseph Smith was a prophet. And that will not be answers by others. Any specific details can be explained. But not proven. Criticisms can be randomly leveled as well, but also not proven. None of the explanations by apologists and none of the accusations by critics have any bearing on the truthfulness of what comes down to the miraculous. Nothing that is a part of the Joseph Smith story and the coming forth of the Book of Mormon is beyond God's power. Some aspect or another may strike someone as odd or implausible -- but God has often worked in mysterious ways, and many of the Biblical stories are odd and sound implausible as well. But only God can reveal God. So the only way one can know for certain that the Book of Mormon is the word of God is by asking God. So how I reconcile any issues that strike me as difficult in any religious experience is by starting from a place of first finding out the truth of it from God, by doing as He has said we can, and asking Him, whereupon He gives liberally to those who ask. If one knows the Book of Mormon is the word of God because the Holy Spirit has told one so, then one can easily reconcile any concerning problems with that as a starting point. Read the Book of Mormon and then get on your knees and humbly ask God if it is true. He will answer you. The rest is just historical detail...which is sometimes unreliable, always imperfect, and heavily based on the bias of the reporter. But God has no bias, no imperfection and is perfectly reliable. Go to Him and ask.
  25. 0 points
    NightSG

    training for Bishops

    Well, we tried swatting one on the nose with a rolled up newspaper, but eventually he hid all the newspapers and still wears jeans to Sacrament Meeting. And since most of them have opposable thumbs, they just take the shock collars off.