Godless

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Godless last won the day on March 29 2019

Godless had the most liked content!

About Godless

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    Senior Member - somehow haven't been banned yet
  • Birthday 10/13/1985

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    Male
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    Minnesota
  • Interests
    craft beer, good food, and loud music
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    atheist

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  1. I think I saw that he's eligible to be included as an Independent candidate in all but 7 states, but those ineligible states include Texas and New York.
  2. Godless

    LAPD Budget

    Just curious, does your work cover more urban or suburban areas? I've seen it noted (without documentation, hence my question) that social workers are more likely to be deployed in suburban neighborhoods, often with LO support, while inner cities usually just send cops where a social worker might be useful. Even in 2020, many cities have stark racial disparities between inner cities and suburbs (not sure how true this is in Utah though). If it's true that suburban precincts are more likely to deploy social workers, it could be indicative of either a lack of funding for inner city social programs, or possibly indifference on the part of the people responding to those calls. Maybe both. This is actually a "middle ground" solution that I've seen a considerable amount of support for. I've heard countless horror stories about cops horribly mishandling domestic disturbances, including those involving autistic and other special needs children. It seems like those situations should be handled by someone trained for it, and cops just aren't.
  3. Godless

    LAPD Budget

    And therein lies the heart of the current debate around policing. I haven't seen any video that shows what led up to Brooks swinging at the officers and trying to run away with one of their tasers. The story is that he was passed out drunk in his car and they were trying get him to move. How did that escalate to a fist fight/shooting? Maybe Brooks was belligerent from the onset. Maybe the cops got unnecessarily rough with him and he fought back. Either way, the initial situation wasn't one that should have ended with Brooks losing his life. Same with George Floyd and his counterfeit money. Same with Eric Garner and his illegal cigarette sales. At a certain point, you have to question the ability of beat cops to handle non-violent offenders without escalation that could result in unnecessary death. Brooks, Floyd, and Garner didn't do anything worth being killed for. As for the self-defence argument, I don't see how a suspect running away with a non-lethal debilitating weapon warrants the use of lethal force. It's one dude with one taser against two cops, one of which presumably had a taser as well. Was a verbal warning given before lethal rounds were fired? At what point is it better to let a perp get away than to escalate to lethal force? I'll grant that this case is more convoluted than others that have been in the news, which makes it all the more important that we try to address some of the questions that have arisen over the last few weeks about the role of police in dealing with minor non-violent offenses, the procedures governing escalation in what should be a non-violent interaction, and systems of accountability when things do get violent.
  4. Godless

    LAPD Budget

    Unnecessary use of deadly force, if I had to guess.
  5. Godless

    Faked Protests

    Yes, "colorblindness" has historically been just as much a liberal idea as a conservative one. The black community has recently started to push back on it. The problem is that such thinking has convinced people that racism doesn't exist, that they were taught to treat people as equals by a sytem that doesn't practice what it preaches. Yes, we need to see and treat people equally, but we will never be able to do that so long as we ignore the inequalities that permeate our society. And you won't see those inequalities unless you "see race". And it goes well beyond the justice system. I'm sure you heard the recent story of Amy Cooper in NYC, the lady who called the police on a black man in Central Park after he pointed out that her dog should be on a leash. It's absolutely insane how many stories like that are out there, and it's all bred from white knowledge that black people fear the police. They weaponize that fear. How many times have you been walking around a department store or an outlet store at the mall and noticed that an employee is following you and watching you very closely, but not asking if you need help? How many times have you had the police called on you for walking into your own house because a neighbor thought you were breaking and entering? As I said, black people just want you to hear their stories. They're not asking for special or different treatment. They just want to be treated like their white counterparts, and they want you to recognize that that currently isn't happening. I'm trying to tell you that she already is, and has been for generations. Maybe not always in ways that will show up on a statistics report, but the experience of being black in this country is fundamentally different from the white experience, generally speaking.
  6. Godless

    Faked Protests

    I could never think of you as racist. I know you have a very good heart, and I don't doubt that most others here do as well. First, disparity of justice. When conversations come up about the problems facing black Americans, a lot of people like to talk about "black-on-black" crime. More black people are killed by other black people than by white cops, it's true. But how many black murderers are in prison? How many white cops are in prison for wrongfully killing a black person? Off the top of my head, I can tell you that Eric Garners's killer was fired, but never indicted, and Philando Castile's killer was acquitted. Not cop-related, but Armaud Arbery's killers weren't arrested until public outcry put pressure on local LO nearly 3 months after his death. Meanwhile, around the same time, a black man fired at (and missed) someone intruding into his home and was arrested for it the same day. I tried digging that story back up for updates, but all relevant search terms lead back to Arbery. One has to wonder if George Floyd's killer would have ever been arrested if there hadn't been any public outcry, or if qualified immunity would have protected him. I would encourage you to read up on redlining. It's the discriminatory mortgage-lending practice that ensured that the suburbs stayed white and the inner cities stayed black in post-Depression America. Without white interests in the cities, residents and communities were forgotten by their local budget committees, and that resulted in generational poverty that still affects many inner city black communities today.
  7. Godless

    Faked Protests

    Fair enough. No. Racist Dems were racist long before Trump, and Trump himself used to be a Democrat. I'm only a Democrat because I don't believe in backing unviable third parties. It's either that or the GOP "I don't see race" nonsense. Both stances are flawed, but at least the Dems acknowledge that the experience of being black in America generally differs from the white experience. I won't deny that Dems sometimes invent racial tension, but that doesn't mean that real racial issues don't exist. Thank you for that. I wouldn't have known where to begin to look. I only have slightly more love for the Dems than I do for the GOP. Lesser evils and what-not. And I hate cancel culture, as does a recent Democratic president.
  8. Godless

    Faked Protests

    I chose my source carefully. Cato isn't exactly a bastion of liberal sensationalism. I appreciate you doing some follow-up research though. Even if the disorderly conduct was overblown, I'd say that disorderly conduct of any sort among a group of law enforcement officers is unacceptable. It's one of those professions that should have almost no room for moral error. It "flew over my head" because I don't particularly care who racists vote for. And yes, I'm aware that there are quite a few closet (and maybe some not-so-closet) racists in the Democratic old guard. "Stop & Frisk" was Bloomberg'a baby, after all. That said, your claim about NYPD is eyebrow-raising, and I'm curious what your source is. Again, it doesn't change my view of those cops even remotely. Black people are 13-15% of the US population, to put those numbers in perpective. The big problem in the "racist cops" discussion is that it goes deeper than killing. I tried without success to find some statistics for arrests by race that don't result in charges. The one relevant arrest statistic I could find is that black people are twice as likely than whites to be arrested on minor drug charges, despite similar usage rates. And I know there are virtually no reliable statistics of any sort for excessive use of force or what some might call "harassment", defined as questioning an individual without cause or intent to arrest. That's why, when it comes to police interaction with the black community, anecdotal evidence should be taken into consideration. I know it has its problems, but black people have an alarming number of stories to tell about things that rarely happen to white people. Statistics won't tell those stories. That's why when white people ask what they can do to help, the overwhelming response is simply to listen.
  9. Godless

    Faked Protests

    Speaking of protests, I just emerged from a Twitter rabbit hole that led me to this. I had never heard of it before (I was 7 when it happened). Between this story that sounds like something from the 1950s, not the 90s, and seeing 57 riot police in Buffalo resign in solidarity with two officers who shoved a 75 year-old man (who fell and started bleeding from his head), I'm really having a hard time believing that good cops are the majority. https://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/rudys-racist-rants-nypd-history-lesson
  10. Godless

    A bunch of memes I just made!

    Okay, this one gave me a good laugh.
  11. Godless

    A bunch of memes I just made!

    It refers to widespread prejudice throughout the justice system (and beyond). Racial profiling, excessive use of force, inconsistent sentencing*, all perpetuated by local governments that tend to spend more money on law enforcement and incarceration than rehabilitation and community enrichment. *Remember Brock Turner? The white Stanford rapist who served 3 months of a 6 month sentence after being convicted of 3 counts of sexual assault? That case put a big fat spotlight on how white criminals are sentenced versus black. FWIW, the judge in that case was recalled. But it would be naive to think that disparities like that aren't common, albeit probably less extreme in most cases.
  12. Godless

    A bunch of memes I just made!

    Statistics won't show you the countless times that black people get stopped and questioned by police for no reason whatsoever. Or arrested for the same. Statistics won't show you the patterns of harassment and profiling at the hands of law enforcement. I get that anecdotal evidence is generally problematic, but with so many black voices sharing the pain and fear that permeates their lives daily, it's hard to ignore. As I said, LISTEN to black voices. They've been pretty loud this past week. They want you to hear them. They've lived experiences that statistics won't show you. Ideally, Affirmative Action is meant to expand opportunities without lowering standards for entry. That's not "dumbing down", that's making sure that consideration is given to qualified people who may have otherwise been overlooked. True, how it's supposed to work in theory and how it ACTUALLY works in practice probably aren't the same. I think that makes a case for fixing the system, not eliminating it entirely. Because equal opportunity doesn't exist without it. Why do you think black people started making their own colleges and media organizations?
  13. Godless

    A bunch of memes I just made!

    @JohnsonJones You said a lot of true things in your post, and I've seen those concerns raised elsewhere. The response I typically see boils down to a widely-held belief that black people in America are on the bottom of the minority totem pole. Black people were slaves in this country. Jim Cow affected many minorities, but was aimed specifically at black people. Same with redlining. There's a perception among many in the black community that other minorities consider themselves superior to blacks. Whether or not those perceptions have merit is a tricky question, and probably varies by location. In San Antonio, for example, I'd say it's pretty accurate. It might be different in a place like Utah or Iowa, where blacks and other minorities are more or less equally outnumbered by whites. Regardless, saying that black lives matter isn't saying that other minority lives don't, much like saying "save the wetlands" isn't a dismissal of other vulnerable ecosystems. Black people are the only group in America that couldn't trace their heritage until very recently with the rise of DNA-based online ancestry databases. And black people have understandable reservations about giving their DNA to strangers. See the link below for some insight into the medical community's history with black people. https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2017/10/25/556673640/scientists-work-to-overcome-legacy-of-tuskegee-study-henrietta-lacks Then there's the violence against their communities, the Tulsa massacre of 1921, the day in 1985 when police literally dropped a bomb into a Philadelphia neighborhood, countless lynchings ignored and/or endorsed by law enforcement. And the innumerable instances of police brutality and excessive use of force against black people. Again, not saying that it doesn't happen to other races, but the black community has a particularly bloody history with law enforcement. I think an argument can be made that black people, in general, experience more instances of discrimination and violence, and with greater intensity, than other minorities. Exceptions will always exist, and ALL racism is bad. And I'd venture to say that if we can make progress in how we treat the black community, other racial minorities will benefit as well. I don't think jokes about the current situation are particularly funny. That was actually my main point. If you think this is all about reparations, then you haven't been listening. Reparations for past grievances won't mean much if grievances keep piling up. I'd urge you to take the time to read and hear the things that black activists are saying. They have a lot of reform ideas that I would hope anyone who is not a blatant racist can get behind. I won't detail them here because I want you to hear it from them. I want you to put in the work that I have been trying to and listen with an open mind. Some of what they say might make you uncomfortable. Don't let that deter you. White comfort has resulted in decades of white indifference. That was a significant part of Dr. King's message, that white complacency is part of the problem. My impression about the backlash against Affirmative Action is that it is largely based on white resentment over having to work harder to prove their merits. If you think that's bad, try being black in pre-Affirmative Action America. I'm not saying it's a perfect system or that it can't be tweaked into a true meritocracy, but it's better than what it replaced. As I said above, if you can reduce racism against blacks, everyone benefits. Then you haven't been paying attention to how black people are treated when arrested versus white people. The sad truth is that George Floyd's death would have been far more shocking if he had been white, because you just don't see cops treating white people like that. Again, in general. Please don't bother trying to find one or two exceptions so you can make an "ah-HA!" anecdotal argument. Exceptions don't disprove patterns.
  14. Godless

    A bunch of memes I just made!

    Hey! I can make memes too!
  15. So dumb. I can't begin to imagine what was going through his head. I'm curious about this as well. It will also be interesting to see how military forces respond, if their role in this expands. And the way things have been, I think it will. I mean, you're not wrong, but I'm not going to fault several hundred protestors for suddenly being caught up in security protocols.