Jamie123

Members
  • Content Count

    1896
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from JohnsonJones in Nostalgia (and other stir-crazy ramblings)   
    Yer man Trump wouldn't agree!
    Mine is a lovely yellow and it has special bits that go over my ears to keep it on. I'm doing the family shopping in an hour. I have face mask, gloves, hand sanitizer and ready to kick some COVID 19 butt! Wish me luck!
  2. Haha
    Jamie123 got a reaction from mordorbund in A fun quarantine game I play with my wife   
    The best part is being woken up out of a sound sleep at 2 a.m. to catch spiders, and when you're balancing precariously on a wobbly swivel chair, trying to reach the ceiling with an empty Pringles can (in which to receive Mr. Incey-Wincey Spider) your assembled family demand to know why you don't just kill it.
    Well...as James Henry Trotter once said: 
    ‘I must NEVER kill a spider I must only help and guide her And invite her in the nursery to play.’ On a related topic...
     
  3. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to JohnsonJones in Nostalgia (and other stir-crazy ramblings)   
    My wife isn't knitting one, but she has made this facemask thing out of cloth on a sewing machine.  She is threatening on making me one and having me wear it.
    (Just to clarify, she isn't actually threatening, that was a joke.  They are quite nice and look like others, but are cloth and washable).
  4. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to Carborendum in A fun quarantine game I play with my wife   
    I was going to start a new thread.  But I decided it fits with this comment.
    I found the following item in the kitchen today.

    Apparently it is a "watering can" made by my 8 yo "Bumble Bee." 
    I remarked,"Ok, I guess it would be useful if you dip it into the pond then drop the water into the garden, back and forth."  I noted a weakness in the design due to a hole placed at the level of the hollow handle.
    My wife informed me,"That's not a handle. It's the spout."  I burst out in laughter at a "spout" that holds more volume than the container itself.
    It is just this kind of stuff that I often miss out on when I'm working all the time.  I have the cutest kids.
  5. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in A fun quarantine game I play with my wife   
    It's called "Why are you doing it like that?" Best part -- no winners!
  6. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to SilentOne in Holy Week 2020   
    In case you don't know, you can get texts every day this week "with inspiring ways to #HearHim this Easter, no matter what your circumstances may be" by texting EASTER to 71234 or emails by entering your email address at comeuntochrist.org.

    Zechariah 9:9
    Luke 19:28-40
  7. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Time's arrow   
    https://www.sciencealert.com/three-black-holes-orbiting-each-other-can-t-always-go-backwards-in-time?fbclid=IwAR197b7upYLDcLf1ucvwNY3wWGNrlUweKzhH9SunfyyqEGTSZ4VcBS0I75w
    When I was a BYU undergrad studying physics, one of the things we were taught was that time appeared to be unidirectional*. This was used to explain entropy, why heat never flowed "uphill" and why a balloon might explode but not spontaneously reassemble. This article reports on an experiment that takes things a large step further, suggesting that non-reversibility occurs in stellar systems from perturbations as small as the Planck length (!!!). The suggestion is that chaos (in the mathematical sense) is literally built into the universe. Very, very interesting, from both a physics and a metaphysics point of view.
    *I always wondered if this unidirectionality might not be explained simply by the nature of human psychology and perception. Maybe time flows in both directions, but we only perceive it as flowing in one? But the above article would suggest that, no, perfect temporal reversibility is not possible in all cases. That argues pretty persuasively for one-way time. As I tell my children, "I have travel here through time from 1963 to bring you this message: Sweep the floor."
  8. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to Fether in Riddle   
    How do you know that isn’t her daughter’s name? She has four very strangely named sons, I wouldn’t put it past her to name her daughter “Someone”
  9. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Riddle   
    Jamie likes baseball!
  10. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to Fether in Riddle   
    I’ve seen this riddle before, but with in variation. It ended with “Can you tell me the name of the fourth son?” And the answer is simply “no”
  11. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Geek test   
    Please ignore the grass remnant on the carpet. Our carpets are normally clean enough to eat off of. Which may explain why there's food all over them I assumed it would be clean for this pic.
  12. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from dprh in Lame Jokes, the Sequel   
    What's the definition of "baroque"?
    When you have no Monet.
  13. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from dprh in Lame Jokes, the Sequel   
    What's the definition of "baroque"?
    When you have no Monet.
  14. Haha
    Jamie123 reacted to askandanswer in Lame Jokes, the Sequel   
    Another one from my local butcher
     
    R.I P Boiling Water
    You'll be mist
  15. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from MrShorty in "Daisy, Daisy...   
    ...give me your ansa-doo!"
    I always associate that song with two things:
    A very rude version of the chorus which some kids used to sing when I was at school. (I don't know...some people!) The scene in 2001 A Space Odyssey where, after the spaceship's computer HAL-9000 goes on a killing spree, the one surviving astronaut disconnects its circuits one by one, causing it to lose gradually its cognitive capacity. At the end, all it can remember is this song, taught to it by its first programmer. (Which incidentally was the first song sung by a computer using speech synthesis.) Did you know that that song has verses to it as well as the chorus? Check it out: 
    I only found that out today!
  16. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from Vort in Best Looney Tunes   
    That Foghorn Leghorn episode had me in stitches for weeks when I first saw it. It's often made me wonder - was it just pure wackyness, or did the writers have some idea of quantum tunneling?
  17. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from MrShorty in "Daisy, Daisy...   
    ...give me your ansa-doo!"
    I always associate that song with two things:
    A very rude version of the chorus which some kids used to sing when I was at school. (I don't know...some people!) The scene in 2001 A Space Odyssey where, after the spaceship's computer HAL-9000 goes on a killing spree, the one surviving astronaut disconnects its circuits one by one, causing it to lose gradually its cognitive capacity. At the end, all it can remember is this song, taught to it by its first programmer. (Which incidentally was the first song sung by a computer using speech synthesis.) Did you know that that song has verses to it as well as the chorus? Check it out: 
    I only found that out today!
  18. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to mirkwood in Best Looney Tunes   
    A Disney Looney Tunes mix that I like
     
     
  19. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to mirkwood in Best Looney Tunes   
  20. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Best Looney Tunes   
  21. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Best Looney Tunes   
  22. Like
    Jamie123 reacted to Vort in Best Looney Tunes   
    Can't be chosen, of course. How do you beat The Rabbit of Seville? But here's a nomination.
     
  23. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from Vort in Cicadas and Cicada Killers   
    That's a good book - I read it quite a few years ago. There was a lot in it about the biological sciences I hadn't previously known - like about non-coding DNA, and about the differences between eukaryotic life (basically everything I had previously considered "life" and some) and other sorts of life (which I'd had no idea existed). Totally fascinating stuff - especially about slime molds. And he must have made some attempt at accuracy, otherwise the Royal Society would hardly have made him an Honorary Fellow.  
    This one I'm reading now is The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, which I think is intentionally based on the "knowledge" he had when he was about 9 or 10. (Which I think is actually quite a clever idea - juvenile mindset framed in adult language.) I had it on my shelf for about 5 years, after having been given it by a friend; I'd somehow got the notion it was all going to be about baseball, which is why I put off reading it until now. Brilliant - though I warn you its quite disgusting in parts! (If you think of the gross stuff that fascinates kids, you'll get an idea of the sort of thing I'm referring to!)
  24. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from Vort in Cicadas and Cicada Killers   
    I was reading Bill Bryson last night, and he was talking about his experiences with cicada killers as a kid growing up in Des Moines, Iowa. I was intrigued enough to look them up online:
    According to Bill Bryson:
    Cicada killers are not cicadas Cicada killers are about the size of humming birds Cicada killers are armed with stings "front and aft" Cicada killers appear only every 17 years. When they do come, they swarm out of their underground nests and attack anyone unfortunate enough to be nearby. Their favourite mode of attack is to fly right up your trouser legs and attack your genitals, for which the only cure is castration. According to every other source I have consulted (which admittedly isn't many):
    Cicada killers are not cicadas. (Bryson is at least right about this.) They are in fact a species of wasp, while cicadas are more like locusts. Cicada killers catch cicadas to feed to their young, which eat them alive, in a venom-induced coma, saving the vital organs till last to keep the cicadas alive (and fresh) as long as possible. [Delightful I know. Charles Darwin had something interesting to say about these kinds of insects, and whether the God who supposedly created them has a sick mind.] Adult cicada killers themselves only eat nectar. Cicada killers are large by wasp-standards, but nothing like the size of hummingbirds. They are actually smaller than cicadas, and sometimes have difficulty dragging captured cicadas back to their nests. Cicada killers are armed with regular stings, same as any other wasp. Cicada killers come every year. It is cicadas that only emerge every 17 years, but they don't all emerge at on once, so every year there is a supply of emerging cicadas for the wasps. Cicada killers do not attack humans unless severely provoked. I love to read Bill Bryson, but I wouldn't recommend him as a source of accurate information. For example he said that there were only 20 episodes of Sky King, which the networks repeated ad nausium, whereas a bit of Googling will tell you there were actually over 70.
    Here's a picture of a chicada killer and a captured cicada.

  25. Like
    Jamie123 got a reaction from LiterateParakeet in Rated R movies   
    I'm not totally sure what an R movie is (we have a different classification system in the UK) - I guess it's similar to our 18 rating. But there are a lot of things milder than those, which some people will consider beyond the pale. Many, many years ago, when I was young, I was browsing in my local poster shop, when a man came storming in. He was one of those tall, smart, serious, ultra-respectable-looking men who I've always found a little unnerving; I rather fancy he had a mustache. Anyway, he stormed up to the counter holding a poster, which he presented to the woman serving for her inspection. It was a picture of Pamela Anderson - quite a well known one in fact - wearing tight denim shorts and a stetson hat, leading forward so that you can see quite a lot of...well, I think we all know what you can see quite a lot of whenever Pamela Anderson leans forward. (Steamy stuff I grant you, though nothing worse than you'd see on page 3 of The Sun - even in these ultra-feminist days!) I know it's bad to eavesdrop, but there are some things you can't help hearing, and the conversation went something like this:
    Man: My son bought this here, and I'm not allowing him to have it. He's twelve years old and he's very keen on Pamela Anderson but I'm...but, well, I'm not allowing him to have it!
    Woman: (takes poster) Well...OK I'll give you a refund.
    [Short pause while woman fumbles about with the till. Man is [I suspect] a little taken aback that she has agreed so readily, and feels cheated out of a good argument. He's going to make one though, if it's the last thing he ever does!]
    Man: (with faux casualness) I'm interested...do you normally sell pornography to 12-year-old boys?
    Woman: (looks at poster) Well it's not exactly pornography, now is it?
    Man: I consider that to be pornography!
    Woman: That is not pornography!
    Man: Well I...
    Woman: Look, if you want a refund, for the sake of goodwill I'll give you one, but that is not pornography!
    Exchanges continue between man and woman, each determined to have the last word on the matter, until eventually the man storms out deeply dissatisfied.