prisonchaplain

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  1. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to TheTanakas in Hi from a recent joinee to church   
    My family and I were in the Shino religion.  Last year, we had several missionaries from this church
    and Jehovah's Witnesses talk about their faith and we were shown from the Bible and Book of Mormon
    that Jesus was not Michael the Archangel.  We attended a few Sunday meetings and felt it was a
    good place to learn more about the Christian faith. Then we were asked to be baptized.
    Now we try to follow a routine like the Come Follow Me outlines on a weekly/monthly basis.
  2. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from NeuroTypical in A Single Conversation With a Single Baptist   
    Most Trinitarians know that God is three persons but one God. They know Jesus is God. They know the Holy Spirit is God. They know the Father is God. They know the three are distinct, yet they are one. So, when LDS ask questions like, "But was Jesus praying to himself in the Garden?" the answer is, "Of course not!" "Oh, so you agree with us that they are separate?" Confusion arises very quickly at this point. I'll lay this out again:
    Muslims/Jews/Jehovah's Witnesses: God is one and Jesus is not God.
    Modalists: God is one. Jesus is God. He reveals himself in 3 modes--as Father, Son or Holy Spirit. (Some summarize this as God being 1 in 3).
    Trinitarians: God is one. Jesus is God. So is the Father. So is the Spirit. They are distinct, but still they are one all the way down to their essence. How this is so is beyond us, but there it is.
    LDS Godhead: God is one. Jesus is God. So is the Father. So is the Spirit. They are separate. What unites them is their purpose. Yet, this unity of purpose is so strong we can be called monotheists.
    Modalists have a hard time explaining how the different persons can exist simultaneously and interact if they are all just Jesus.
    Trinitarians have a hard time explaining how God can be 3 and 1 at the same time.
    LDS have a hard time explaining how 3 beings can exist at the same time--in different bodies--and still be so one that it qualifies as monotheism. The difficulty is compounded by the doctrine of exaltation.
    Of course the Muslims, Jews and Jehovah's Witnesses think Trinitarians aren't truly monotheistic either. 
  3. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to dahlia in Temples and Adult Converts   
    I did a few baptisms for the dead when I first got my recommend. It was a good experience, but as an adult, no, I didn't want to get in the baptismal font too many times. 
  4. Love
    prisonchaplain reacted to mordorbund in Not believing in the traditional Christ   
    From reading previous posts, "serious error" means falling into a path that actually leads a person away from God (or at the very least impedes true worship). It happens by "diverting too far one way or the other". In this sense, worshiping God polytheistically when Israel was expressly told to leave those other gods alone seems to be a step in the wrong direction.
    Oh, looks like PC covered that already.
     
    First, I'll point out that if revelation says we ought to do something, then disciples are going to strive to do that regardless of whether or not the why was revealed as well. (Surely God doesn't declare a person "unworthy" simply because he has a cup of coffee in the morning, or drinks green tea for his health).
    Second, for the specific argument you raise, there has been further apostolic counsel given. Paul writes that nature itself grants sufficient understanding of God that even non-believers should be able to follow core principles.
    Oh, looks like PC covered that already.
     
    This is why I quipped "What if my belief is that serious error should be corrected, and that an incorrect understanding of God is a serious error?" You are stridently arguing against the notion of "serious error" as though belief in it is itself a serious error. Just now you compared it to "false godhood", which the revelations have a term for that: idolatry. Even if you term it differently, this sounds like a path that leads to condemnation.
     
    First off, even though you earlier correctly stated that the belief in the Trinity is 3 persons 1 being, you're here conflating the two terms. But, specifics aside, if you really want to understand why believing in a false god is a very bad thing, I suggest rereading the previous posts (not just from PC, others have weighed in as well). To those arguments I briefly add that when Jesus taught the woman at the well, he pointed out how confused her worship was (ye worship ye know not what) and testified that it was more of an obstacle (salvation is of the Jews).
     
  5. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Anddenex in Oregon Woman sues Church for reporting abuse   
    I could be wrong, but my understanding is that only the Roman Catholic Church has the rite of Confession, which does involve a sacred veil of secrecy and privacy. Protestant clergy would generally report such matters to authorities. On the other hand, if we could tell a conversation was going in this direction we might remind the counselee that incidents of criminal behavior--especially involving minors--must be reported.
  6. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to MrShorty in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    Considering what I wrote above, I think I have to answer, "no" to this one. I do not share the same fellowship with a muslim that I would share with a Catholic that I would share with a Protestant that I would share with a fellow Latter-day Saint. Even within this last category, there can be differences, so it feels more like a sliding scale rather than a "in fellowship/out of fellowship" binary. But I also don't see any clear lines where I can say that I won't share a pew with ________, either.
  7. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from MrShorty in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    I can love and appreciate people very different from myself. One of our staff is literally Pagan--he's awesome--and very respectful of Christian spirituality. There are ways in which he impresses me more than some of my fellow believers. However, can I have the same kind of fellowship with him as I do with those of like precious faith? I do not find it arrogant or off-putting for those of the same faith to find special bonds and connections. When Jesus said his followers would be known for their love, I suspect he meant primarily the way we love each other.
  8. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to MormonGator in Oregon Woman sues Church for reporting abuse   
    High church Anglicans and Lutherans also have private confession.  
  9. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from MrShorty in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    The others I'm all-in on. However, this statement concerns me. To offer an example of why consider that Muslims believe that Jesus is a prophet of God (Peace Be Upon Him). They do not believe Him to be the Son of God, or God. In LDS teaching on the Plan of Salvation, a sincere Muslim would likely end up in the Terrestial Kingdom--a heavenly realm. His reward would be due to Christ's saving work. Jesus is his savior, whether he knows it or not. (All of this assumes he does not fully embrace the teachings he receives in the life to come). So...would you acknowledge with a Muslim 'our mutual Savior Jesus Christ?'
  10. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from MrShorty in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    The others I'm all-in on. However, this statement concerns me. To offer an example of why consider that Muslims believe that Jesus is a prophet of God (Peace Be Upon Him). They do not believe Him to be the Son of God, or God. In LDS teaching on the Plan of Salvation, a sincere Muslim would likely end up in the Terrestial Kingdom--a heavenly realm. His reward would be due to Christ's saving work. Jesus is his savior, whether he knows it or not. (All of this assumes he does not fully embrace the teachings he receives in the life to come). So...would you acknowledge with a Muslim 'our mutual Savior Jesus Christ?'
  11. Okay
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from zil in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    Chocolate covered coffee beans are a real thing, and I imagine there are all kinds of matcha tea (green) flavored candies and pastries.
  12. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from MormonGator in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    Most 'mainstream' Christians do indeed have a good impression of LDS. You don't drink, smoke, gamble or chew...not even coffee or tea! You don't cuss, tend to present as sharp, intelligent and hardworking. Further, the alleged ulterior motive is one all Christians share. We DO want to see souls converted--certainly to Jesus. Joining my specific church would be icing on the cake.
    Doctrines and beliefs are another matter. 'Annoying' just doesn't describe it (except for the coffee/tea ban--that is annoying ). It used to be (in Joseph Smith's day, for example) that believers in predestination (Reformed churches, Presbyterians, Calvinists, etc.) questioned the salvation of us free-will folk (Methodists, Wesleyan, etc.). After all, we did not seem to properly understand God's sovereignty and power. Adventists were also suspect as late as the 1960s, as many argued that they did not teach salvation by faith (insisting on observance of Old Testament laws related to the Sabbath). Boundary-marking/keeping has decreased rapidly, but LDS teachings about the nature of God/humanity and salvation are all very difficult for Protestants and Catholics.
  13. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from MormonGator in "It's time Christians started including Latter-day Saints"   
    Most 'mainstream' Christians do indeed have a good impression of LDS. You don't drink, smoke, gamble or chew...not even coffee or tea! You don't cuss, tend to present as sharp, intelligent and hardworking. Further, the alleged ulterior motive is one all Christians share. We DO want to see souls converted--certainly to Jesus. Joining my specific church would be icing on the cake.
    Doctrines and beliefs are another matter. 'Annoying' just doesn't describe it (except for the coffee/tea ban--that is annoying ). It used to be (in Joseph Smith's day, for example) that believers in predestination (Reformed churches, Presbyterians, Calvinists, etc.) questioned the salvation of us free-will folk (Methodists, Wesleyan, etc.). After all, we did not seem to properly understand God's sovereignty and power. Adventists were also suspect as late as the 1960s, as many argued that they did not teach salvation by faith (insisting on observance of Old Testament laws related to the Sabbath). Boundary-marking/keeping has decreased rapidly, but LDS teachings about the nature of God/humanity and salvation are all very difficult for Protestants and Catholics.
  14. Haha
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from zil in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    My wife has a PhT from my school: Putting hubby Through
  15. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Midwest LDS in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    My denomination is quite young, having been founded in 1914. Initially education was discouraged. Jesus was coming back soon and there was precious little time to be acquiring 'man's wisdom.' In the early years our churches were short of pastors, so quite a few Bible institutes were started. Eventually they transformed into Bible colleges. Due to this heritage, our church maintains about a half dozen universities--most quite small at roughly 2,000 on-campus students. They are named for their regions: Southeast, North Central, Northwest, etc. So, in those early years, the common joke was that Mary had gone off to Northwest Bridle Bridal College. The schools are universities now, and many women go to study nursing, education, etc. Also, we do have ordained females, though they represent less than 10% of our ministers. Still...60-65% female is not uncommon at our schools.
  16. Haha
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from zil in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    My wife has a PhT from my school: Putting hubby Through
  17. Haha
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from zil in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    Oops... Bridal.
  18. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to Scott in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    This is just my own perception, but at least when I was younger and growing up in Utah, my perception was that there was a lot more pressure on men to attend BYU than there were women.   There was probably was more pressure for member men in general to attend college as well, but especially BYU.
    If you were Norman Mormon (a term used by Seminary teachers at the time), the ultimate goal to aspire to was to go on a mission, go to BYU, get married in the Temple (at an early age of course), and have kids.   Women weren't discouraged from serving a mission or going to BYU, but it was expected of Men to go on missions and they were highly encouraged to go to BYU.   The U of U was the gentile hangout (although a lot of Church member, including myself went there) and was somehow viewed as the lesser goal among many.   
    My own guess is that the discrepancy concerning the male-female ratio at BYU is at least partially and probably largely due to Church culture, especially in Utah.  
     
  19. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to Moonbeast32 in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    The Men and women who attend BYU often get an education with a specific goal in mind: Marriage and family. It is also commonly held that the best way to raise children is with stay-at-home parenting.
    In this church, women are often encouraged to be a stay-at-home mother. This does not mean they are discouraged from getting an education. It may seem like a waste, but let me tell you a story. My father was a very sick and injury prone man. When I was in my teenage years, he was officially put on long-term disability. The disability money was proving to be not enough to support our family of 5, so my Mother was obliged to put her master's degree to use once more, and start teaching. Contrary to what the anti would have you think, we did not become social pariahs because of this.
    In short, education is encouraged, but motherhood is even more encouraged. 
    None of this is based on any official research or anything, just what I've observed.
  20. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Midwest LDS in Female v. Male College Ratios   
    I did some digging and the top reasons given are: Women simply have more opportunities now, women are more adaptable and resilient, men find it easier to get decent-paying jobs after high school, men DO indeed gravitate more to trade schools. As for religious schools, women tend to be more devout, and so might be more interested in an overtly religious educational community.
    I'm wondering if BYU is different, in part, because men are perceived as having greater leadership responsibilities. If so, this might be true in Christian traditions that still embrace male leadership (i.e. denominations that do not allow female clergy).
  21. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Vort in Temples and Adult Converts   
    There's a Korean saying that goes back a generation: Easy to marry, easy to divorce. Hard to marry, hard to divorce. This is one area where I do have a bit of holy envy.
  22. Thanks
    prisonchaplain reacted to anatess2 in Temples and Adult Converts   
    After getting baptized, I immediately had the opportunity to interview for a limited temple recommend.  This is good for baptisms and confirmation only.  After 1 year, I was given the opportunity to interview for a full temple recommend to get my endowments (which includes the covenant to wear garments) afterwhich I was eligible to get sealed to my husband.  After being endowed and sealed for myself, I could get endowments and sealings for those that have already passed.
    I went to do baptisms and confirmation for the dead a lot.  At least once a month until I was eligible for endowments.  I found that doing this service allows me to better re-affirm my own baptismal covenants.  When I went to get my endowments I was 3 weeks from giving birth to my first child so I was ginormous, hot, and uncomfortably waddling around.  I was separated from my husband and I simply followed ushers around and the symbolism went whooz over my head.  I was feeling very lost until my husband came out of one door in his ceremonial clothing and when I looked at him, his very blonde hair looked like a halo over his head and his white clothes made him look like he was backlit with sunshine - he looked like one of those Catholic saints that I adored since a little kid - and I immediately felt this sense of peace and comfort.  The rest of the day was just awesome especially when we got sealed with my husband's first bishop who he loved dearly performing the ordinance.   
     
  23. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Vort in Temples and Adult Converts   
    There's a Korean saying that goes back a generation: Easy to marry, easy to divorce. Hard to marry, hard to divorce. This is one area where I do have a bit of holy envy.
  24. Like
    prisonchaplain reacted to askandanswer in Temples and Adult Converts   
    Pretty much all active LDS parents would be absolutely delighted that their children are planning to be married in the temple, and, I believe, would generally do all they could to bring about such an outcome.
  25. Like
    prisonchaplain got a reaction from Vort in Temples and Adult Converts   
    There's a Korean saying that goes back a generation: Easy to marry, easy to divorce. Hard to marry, hard to divorce. This is one area where I do have a bit of holy envy.