mordorbund

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  1. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from Anddenex in Bull-crap Indoctrination about Bull-crap.   
    That's why humans extincted them so hard.
  2. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from Anddenex in Bull-crap Indoctrination about Bull-crap.   
    That's why humans extincted them so hard.
  3. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from Anddenex in Bull-crap Indoctrination about Bull-crap.   
    That's why humans extincted them so hard.
  4. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from Anddenex in Bull-crap Indoctrination about Bull-crap.   
    That's why humans extincted them so hard.
  5. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from Anddenex in Bull-crap Indoctrination about Bull-crap.   
    That's why humans extincted them so hard.
  6. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Just_A_Guy in Salt Lake Temple Capstone Opened   
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orson_Spencer
  7. Haha
    mordorbund reacted to Jamie123 in What would you have done if you'd seen the ark wobble?   
    This is not actually the same thing at all, but it put me in mind of this Dave Allen sketch:
     
  8. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Jamie123 in The Hobbit (As you've never seen it before!)   
    Do you remember the first movie version of The Hobbit?
    If you think I'm talking about the Bass-Rankin animated version, think again. Not many people know this, but the first movie adaptation came out in 1967, a full 10 years before the Bass-Rankin movie!
    Wikipedia gives us the story behind it: it seems that producer William L. Snyder had bought the film rights in 1964, but was unable to find the collaborators he needed to make the movie. With the rights about to expire, he needed to (i) make the movie and (ii) have people pay to see it, or else the rights would revert to Tolkien
    So he commissioned animator Gene Deitch (who had worked him on Popeye and Tom and Jerry) to make The Hobbit as a cartoon short. Having flung the thing together as cheaply and nastily as he could, he charged his audience a dime each to see the it (dimes, by the way, that he had given them beforehand) so that they could honestly say they had "paid to see the movie".
    Thanks to this, Snyder kept the movie rights, which he was then able to sell back to J.R.R. Tolkien for $100,000.
    And thanks to YouTube, we can see this wonderful movie in it's full 12-minutes of glory! Enjoy!
    P.S. I was so fascinated I did some more web searching. I don't know how reliable this is, but I've read the movie cost $50 to make. I don't believe it - even the puerile Super 8 animations my friends and I used to make at school - which didn't even have sound (let alone music) - couldn't have cost much less if you factored everything in.
  9. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Jamie123 in A message to Shania Twain...   
    He's got a good voice. I think I prefer the D***e Chicks' version though.
     
  10. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from JohnsonJones in Temples And Protection   
    Thanks for engaging. It sounds to me like Roman Catholics acknowledge that some of the principles taught through temple worship (such as the atoning death of the Messiah) continued to be taught but now used different symbols. Additionally, some forms of worship that revolved around the temple and feast day sabbaths were "democratized" (there's probably a better word for it) into local community worship. John recognized the messianic symbolism of the Paschal meal, but Christ introduced the Lord's Supper for remembrance. On top of that, those things that survived the transition from the Law of Moses (specifically priesthood) carried over some of the liturgical practices and symbols. But even in this case, some were modified to reflect the new covenant. 
    Please let me know if I've gotten anything wrong.
    For Latter-day Saints, we believe that many of the principles taught in the temple continue to be taught. Some of these principles (such as the atoning death of the Messiah, man's ascent through grace, and the return to God's presence) continue to be taught in modern temples but use different physical symbols. Some temple practices have been democratized so more of the community may participate (as you noted with women participating in the ordinance alongside those with the Melchizedek priesthood) and so that they may be performed within the community (such as the sacrament example used above and our solemn assemblies). Some symbols still carried over (for instance, some of our temples have a holy of holies apart from the celestial room) but even in this case, they have been modified to reflect the new covenant (others may enter the holy of holies, but it will only be under the direction of the presiding high priest).
    Additionally we have other practices that have been restored that have been placed under the umbrella of temple worship. For example, we perform baptisms for the dead in the temple because we have a revelation specifically telling us that it should be performed in the temple. The revelation notes that if the saints are too poor to have a temple then they may perform it elsewhere. We find mention of baptisms for the dead in the New Testament and suppose that the former saints had this practice. I don't think anyone claims that it was ever performed in the Jerusalem temple, and if you'd like we can discuss that as a follow up.
    I may be in the minority here, but I think some elements of our temple worship are original to our day but still rightfully belong in the temple. That is, even if we had all the secret records and the oral traditions of the Jerusalem temple we still wouldn't find these practices. The Nauvoo temple was built so the Lord could "reveal unto my church things which have been kept hid from before the foundation of the world, things that pertain to the dispensation of the fulness of times." Because we don't have a closed canon, modern deuteronomists can update temple worship practice in accordance with the Lord's authority and revelation.
    Hope this helps.
  11. Haha
  12. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from JohnsonJones in .   
    This is what got me thinking on the idea:
    It's part of an essay B.H. Roberts wrote in the introduction of History of the Church, vol. 4.
    It would give cities more power within their states, and possibly on the national level, but would separate their interests from the rest of the state.
  13. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from JohnsonJones in .   
    What do you think about granting city-state status to cities that grow sufficiently large? Give them their own electoral votes separate from the rest of the state, and their own Representatives but maybe no Senators (consistent with today)?
  14. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from JohnsonJones in Temples And Protection   
    Thanks for engaging. It sounds to me like Roman Catholics acknowledge that some of the principles taught through temple worship (such as the atoning death of the Messiah) continued to be taught but now used different symbols. Additionally, some forms of worship that revolved around the temple and feast day sabbaths were "democratized" (there's probably a better word for it) into local community worship. John recognized the messianic symbolism of the Paschal meal, but Christ introduced the Lord's Supper for remembrance. On top of that, those things that survived the transition from the Law of Moses (specifically priesthood) carried over some of the liturgical practices and symbols. But even in this case, some were modified to reflect the new covenant. 
    Please let me know if I've gotten anything wrong.
    For Latter-day Saints, we believe that many of the principles taught in the temple continue to be taught. Some of these principles (such as the atoning death of the Messiah, man's ascent through grace, and the return to God's presence) continue to be taught in modern temples but use different physical symbols. Some temple practices have been democratized so more of the community may participate (as you noted with women participating in the ordinance alongside those with the Melchizedek priesthood) and so that they may be performed within the community (such as the sacrament example used above and our solemn assemblies). Some symbols still carried over (for instance, some of our temples have a holy of holies apart from the celestial room) but even in this case, they have been modified to reflect the new covenant (others may enter the holy of holies, but it will only be under the direction of the presiding high priest).
    Additionally we have other practices that have been restored that have been placed under the umbrella of temple worship. For example, we perform baptisms for the dead in the temple because we have a revelation specifically telling us that it should be performed in the temple. The revelation notes that if the saints are too poor to have a temple then they may perform it elsewhere. We find mention of baptisms for the dead in the New Testament and suppose that the former saints had this practice. I don't think anyone claims that it was ever performed in the Jerusalem temple, and if you'd like we can discuss that as a follow up.
    I may be in the minority here, but I think some elements of our temple worship are original to our day but still rightfully belong in the temple. That is, even if we had all the secret records and the oral traditions of the Jerusalem temple we still wouldn't find these practices. The Nauvoo temple was built so the Lord could "reveal unto my church things which have been kept hid from before the foundation of the world, things that pertain to the dispensation of the fulness of times." Because we don't have a closed canon, modern deuteronomists can update temple worship practice in accordance with the Lord's authority and revelation.
    Hope this helps.
  15. Haha
  16. Haha
    mordorbund reacted to NeedleinA in Push for Utah to mandate statewide mask wearing   
    Also
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Just checking the trigger level of the thread thus far.
  17. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Jonah in Temples And Protection   
    The cross became the earliest symbol.  I believe any rituals and / or practices which they practiced
    are spoken of in scripture although some arose later out of human traditions.
    Several components of the Old Testament system became incorporated into the Roman Catholic
    system. Priests, garments, some washings, the altar, incense, and the holy of holies (where 
    the eucharist is kept until it is needed).  
    More is described here
    http://www.vatican.va/content/vatican/en.html
    http://catholicfaith.co.uk/
    Politics became intertwined with religion in the Roman Empire.
  18. Haha
  19. Haha
  20. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Carborendum in Police Reform   
    Yes.  I like that about the federalist system we have.
    What I was pointing out is that traffic stops are often a very dangerous operation for the officer.  He often has no idea whom he's up against.  So, for an unarmed "citizen" to approach people in that setting, in a city with one of the highest crime rates in the country...  But if it works, great.
    Yes, they'd like to get rid of "pretextual stops".  This is intended to reduce racial profiling.  But there is a very valid reason to use pretextual stops.  
    Here in my town that I live in, we have a major thoroughfare where we experience a high volume of drug traffic.  Not that the citizens of the town use a lot of illicit drugs.  But because it is out-of-the way, it is often used as a place to meet and exchange drugs.   The street is broad and long with a high speed limit with relatively low traffic.
    All the citizens of the area know not to speed down this 10 mile stretch of road.  But those who don't live here are more prone to speeding here.  The police chief said that he's doing this to make it so inconvenient for out-of-town drug traffickers to come here that they'll leave us alone.  Then there are further benefits in the investigation of such individuals.
    To quote the character from the Simpsons (after being asked to return to fix a problem that had been created because they voted him out of office).
  21. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Plein Air in Police Reform   
    .
  22. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Vort in Police Reform   
    1. I appreciate that this is getting done on the local level instead of the state or national. Let them try it and if it works let others adopt it. If it doesn't then the damage is relatively small.
    2. Sounds like they're trying to split police work into violent and non-violent work. I'd like to hear from @mirkwood how reasonable is the assumption that a routine traffic stop only ends with a ticket or a warning, and how often does it include an arrest from outstanding warrants, or conflict escalation, or some other thing.
    3. Something I learned from when my wife was on the HOA board: People want the problem solved - as long as you're the one solving it. Put it back on them and they don't complain as loud (or they rise to the challenge and everyone wins). In an effort to include local policing that represents the community, your senior year of high school you are paired up with experienced LEO to police your neighborhood.
  23. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from mirkwood in What’s the last movie you watched?   
    Full disclosure, MG is a huge Shaq fan so that's probably why he's raving.
  24. Like
    mordorbund reacted to mirkwood in Police Reform   
    The vast majority of traffic stops end in a warning or ticket.  Probably 90% or even higher.
    However...
    If you are actively doing interdiction of some sort those numbers will be higher. 
    If for example, I'm watching a drug house and making traffic stops, those percentages will be significantly higher.
    The shift you work can also influence the arrest numbers.  The highest numbers of arrests I made were on my weekend graveyard shifts.  That is a much different environment then what I work now (weekdays, dayshift).
     
  25. Haha
    mordorbund got a reaction from mirkwood in What’s the last movie you watched?   
    Full disclosure, MG is a huge Shaq fan so that's probably why he's raving.