dahlia

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  1. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from jerome1232 in Choir dress   
    Yes. Yes we are. I don't know why I find their dress so disturbing. I think the colors are flat, there are too many of them, and the women look informal next to the men in suits. It's the same thing when the missionaries sing. The sisters' blouses just strike me as odd and jumbled next to the elders. I didn't even notice the men's ties, I was so wrapped up in the sisters' blouses.
     
    I can always find something to complain about.
  2. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from NightSG in Choir dress   
    Yes. Yes we are. I don't know why I find their dress so disturbing. I think the colors are flat, there are too many of them, and the women look informal next to the men in suits. It's the same thing when the missionaries sing. The sisters' blouses just strike me as odd and jumbled next to the elders. I didn't even notice the men's ties, I was so wrapped up in the sisters' blouses.
     
    I can always find something to complain about.
  3. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Leah in Choir dress   
    Yes. Yes we are. I don't know why I find their dress so disturbing. I think the colors are flat, there are too many of them, and the women look informal next to the men in suits. It's the same thing when the missionaries sing. The sisters' blouses just strike me as odd and jumbled next to the elders. I didn't even notice the men's ties, I was so wrapped up in the sisters' blouses.
     
    I can always find something to complain about.
  4. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Blackmarch in How close do you think we are to the beginning of the end?   
    Why worry about such things?  You will either be alive at the end and have to deal with it, or your own end will come first, and it will no longer be your concern. There is too much to do in the here and now to be worried about the end.
     
    .
  5. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from kapikui in How close do you think we are to the beginning of the end?   
    Why worry about such things?  You will either be alive at the end and have to deal with it, or your own end will come first, and it will no longer be your concern. There is too much to do in the here and now to be worried about the end.
     
    .
  6. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from srmaher in A person cannot be happy without....   
    Drugs do seem to help. I'm only being a little facetious. I spoke to one of my sisters today for about 30 minutes. She's been so depressed she wouldn't come out of her room, hasn't worked in years, and unable to engage in conversation for even a few minutes. She finally got the drugs she needed to help her depression and is coming around to the bright and funny woman I used to know.
     
    I think one needs love to be happy, but I'm going to frame it this way - one needs a parent's love and a sense of 'if the rest of the world goes to hell, I am still secure in the (literal or figurative) arms of my parent. I see people on TV who had a parent abandon them and they still want to meet that parent, many say they love that parent, even though they've never had a relationship with them. These people will never be satisfied (i.e. happy) until they fill that hole in their lives.
     
    I look at Clinton, who has a deep psychological need to please in order to get, I maintain, the love he must not have received as a child. Bush, on the other hand, is still Barbara's 'boy' and knowing that, was able to handle all the terrible things said about him, the hard work of being a war time president, etc. And if you didn't like it? No problem for him. He was gonna go back to Texas and be in the bosom of his parents and their complete acceptance of him.
     
    So, to me, parental love is the basis for happiness. Without that, or without feeling that you had that kind of love, you go looking for love in all the wrong places. : )  Or things that should make you happy, often seem hollow or incomplete. I don't think I had it, but my husband and I tried to give that feeling to our son. I think my husband had that kind of love from his mother, so it was good that one of us had that experience.
  7. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Blackmarch in Missing the ritual, aesthetics, and intellectual thought   
    Former pre-Vatican II Catholic here. I can't tell you how many times I've wanted to make the Sign of the Cross or how many times I've wished for a kneeler in the Celestial Room so I could kneel in contemplation of both the issues I've brought to the temple and my experience in the temple.
     
    I'm finding a fair amount of LDS intellectual thought. Right now (yes, still) I'm reading Hardy's 'Understanding the Book of Mormon.'  Not for those who don't like to think. I've also enjoyed 'Joseph Smith, Jr.: Reappraisals after Two Centuries.'
     
    I'll admit looking at some Catholic stuff every now and then. The woman who founded the nuns who taught me in prep school was canonized a few years ago. That's fantastic to me, so I look at her stuff (and the order) on occasion. I still have a warm place in my heart for the Virgin Mary, in terms of the whole mother thing. I will play old hymns on YouTube, but I play MoTab as well.
     
    Catholicism was a huge part of my life for a long time. It gave me a wonderful education. It made me not be afraid of hard work (actually, to almost seek it out).  That said, thankfully, I was not able to con my parents into letting me go into the convent in high school. : )  I think it's OK if you miss some of your Catholic rituals and behaviors (oh, those plain LDS chapels!). It was a big part of who you were before you converted. Plus, I don't see what's wrong with reading what the popes have written, same thing as reading works by the Dalai Lama or Thích Nhất Hạnh; we can learn from many worthy people.
     
     
  8. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Blackmarch in temple presidents   
    On a trip to Nauvoo, I got to touch an ox and ride in a covered wagon. They are huge animals. Of course, I asked my companion (only half in jest) if the oxen asked to do this work...  I can't help myself sometimes. 
     
    I can't imagine riding for months looking at the back end of an ox, but I guess that back then, everyone was more used to seeing animal bodies and functions out in public.
  9. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Palerider in Missing the ritual, aesthetics, and intellectual thought   
    Former pre-Vatican II Catholic here. I can't tell you how many times I've wanted to make the Sign of the Cross or how many times I've wished for a kneeler in the Celestial Room so I could kneel in contemplation of both the issues I've brought to the temple and my experience in the temple.
     
    I'm finding a fair amount of LDS intellectual thought. Right now (yes, still) I'm reading Hardy's 'Understanding the Book of Mormon.'  Not for those who don't like to think. I've also enjoyed 'Joseph Smith, Jr.: Reappraisals after Two Centuries.'
     
    I'll admit looking at some Catholic stuff every now and then. The woman who founded the nuns who taught me in prep school was canonized a few years ago. That's fantastic to me, so I look at her stuff (and the order) on occasion. I still have a warm place in my heart for the Virgin Mary, in terms of the whole mother thing. I will play old hymns on YouTube, but I play MoTab as well.
     
    Catholicism was a huge part of my life for a long time. It gave me a wonderful education. It made me not be afraid of hard work (actually, to almost seek it out).  That said, thankfully, I was not able to con my parents into letting me go into the convent in high school. : )  I think it's OK if you miss some of your Catholic rituals and behaviors (oh, those plain LDS chapels!). It was a big part of who you were before you converted. Plus, I don't see what's wrong with reading what the popes have written, same thing as reading works by the Dalai Lama or Thích Nhất Hạnh; we can learn from many worthy people.
     
     
  10. Like
    dahlia reacted to NightSG in Where to eat on Conference Sunday in SLC   
    Maybe Conference should be relocated to an area with a large Seventh Day Adventist population.  
  11. Like
    dahlia reacted to drham3rd in Navuoo Temple   
    Dahilia, I understand your post.  I guess since we live in the Appalachians Mnts, we are not use to flat terrain so that was probably the source of our exhausting. Not to mention that we drove straight through, all night from East Tennessee..:)
    You are so blessed to be able to go to the Navuoo Temple, it is such a wonderful place!  Thanks.
  12. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Blackmarch in Navuoo Temple   
    drham3rd - Nauvoo is my temple. We drive down from Iowa, with the same corn and soybean views that you had. It always seems relaxing to see the farms, horses, and cows as we go down. It's so quiet and calm - just what you want as you go to the temple. On the way back, we usually stop to eat, either in town or on the road. It's a nice few hours and doesn't seem exhausting at all.
  13. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from standsresolute in Prepping and LDS teaching   
    I was into food storage before I was LDS.  I was widowed young and had a child to care for. I also didn't know how to drive and really didn't have anyone to depend on  but myself in most of the places I've lived. So, whether the emergency is being laid up with the flu for a week or an ice storm w/no electricity, I knew I had to have food and supplies laid up. I usually had a couple of months worth, plus the lanterns, batteries, feminine products, candles, etc.  I tried to convince all of my single woman friends that I wasn't crazy and that they'd be a lot happier and a lot more secure if they had at least 2 weeks of food and some  survival supplies at home.  I also believe in being armed, but more to protect the stash (and my beautiful self) than to kill an animal. 
  14. Like
    dahlia reacted to mordorbund in temple presidents   
    The ox was given a choice between a service mission or a temple mission. I would have made the same choice.
  15. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from mordorbund in New seminary graduation requirements announced   
    I hear you, but maybe I had another view of Seminary. I thought it was like real classes, that mattered. Which means reading the material. I went to Catholic school for 12 years. We had religion class every year. We had to read stuff. We got tested. I thought Seminary was like the classes run by nuns who had no problem throwing an eraser across the room at you if you messed up. So when I see the kids getting their Seminary award at the end of the year, basically they're just getting it for showing up?
    Maybe it's the professor in me, and yes, I know students may come to class without having done the reading, but I guess I expected something more. I will say that since the students may actually read the materials now, the classes may be more interesting for both teacher and student. It's hard to have a good class if no one has done the reading.
  16. Like
    dahlia reacted to Just_A_Guy in temple presidents   
    I was at a continuing education event with the Utah State Bar a couple of years ago and struck up a conversation with a kindly looking gentleman who turned out to be Robert F. Orton, formerly a member of the 2nd Quorum of the Seventy and fresh off a stint as the president of the St. George Temple.  He's now working with one of the major law firms in downtown SLC, which I imagine must have been rather a surreal transition.
     
    It seems like rather a lot of Seventies, once they go emeritus, end up as the president of some temple or other.
  17. Like
    dahlia reacted to pam in temple presidents   
    About a month ago I cut some fabric for a lady who had to make some "Pioneer" type clothing. She and her husband were called to serve a mission in Nauvoo.  He is a veterinarian by trade and will be in charge of taking care of the animals assigned to the historical sites there in Nauvoo.
  18. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from classylady in Navuoo Temple   
    drham3rd - Nauvoo is my temple. We drive down from Iowa, with the same corn and soybean views that you had. It always seems relaxing to see the farms, horses, and cows as we go down. It's so quiet and calm - just what you want as you go to the temple. On the way back, we usually stop to eat, either in town or on the road. It's a nice few hours and doesn't seem exhausting at all.
  19. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Leah in New seminary graduation requirements announced   
    I hear you, but maybe I had another view of Seminary. I thought it was like real classes, that mattered. Which means reading the material. I went to Catholic school for 12 years. We had religion class every year. We had to read stuff. We got tested. I thought Seminary was like the classes run by nuns who had no problem throwing an eraser across the room at you if you messed up. So when I see the kids getting their Seminary award at the end of the year, basically they're just getting it for showing up?
    Maybe it's the professor in me, and yes, I know students may come to class without having done the reading, but I guess I expected something more. I will say that since the students may actually read the materials now, the classes may be more interesting for both teacher and student. It's hard to have a good class if no one has done the reading.
  20. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Palerider in Navuoo Temple   
    drham3rd - Nauvoo is my temple. We drive down from Iowa, with the same corn and soybean views that you had. It always seems relaxing to see the farms, horses, and cows as we go down. It's so quiet and calm - just what you want as you go to the temple. On the way back, we usually stop to eat, either in town or on the road. It's a nice few hours and doesn't seem exhausting at all.
  21. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Tea/ coffee for guests   
    I get your point, but still say I would accommodate my elderly mother and have coffee for her. In terms of honoring the host's wishes, you aren't wrong, but my impression is that most people just don't see what's wrong with coffee and tea (and neither do I, for the record). It's hard to convince them that they should go without because you're LDS - especially for a convert when the family knows you drank the stuff for decades. Even people who drink liquor and who smoke can see the downside to these activities. They would 'get' your refusal to buy liquor or cigarettes. But coffee and tea, I'm sorry. I adhere to the WOW because I promised to do so, but most of the world gets along just fine drinking them. I don't see guests as knocking my religion by asking me to have some instant coffee for them.
     
    I should clarify that by 'guest' I mean someone staying overnight for awhile, not the drop in guest, or even the invited guest for something like watching football. I don't see why you have to cater to those people at all.
  22. Like
    dahlia reacted to mordorbund in Does anyone have a calling that secretly appeals to you and that you would say yes to without having to ponder?   
    I believe that class is called Gossip Essentials.
     
     
     
    - still no groan button, huh?
  23. Like
    dahlia reacted to EarlJibbs in Does anyone have a calling that secretly appeals to you and that you would say yes to without having to ponder?   
    Oooh. I have one. I want to be a hallway instructor. I would start lesson topics discussions with those that do not go to class and hang out in the halls. This way I could be in the halls, and get something out of it also.
  24. Like
  25. Like
    dahlia got a reaction from Blackmarch in Tea/ coffee for guests   
    I'm reading the responses and thinking about this again. I'd say for regular visitors, they have to deal with whatever you feel comfortable having in your house.
     
    For parents, maybe you have to do something more. For those of us with elderly, non-member parents, surely we can make their time with us more pleasant by providing the coffee or tea that they like to have.