classylady

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  1. Love
    classylady got a reaction from dprh in Hello, long time reader and poster, and I need support in a hard time   
    I’m not sure how to help. Just don’t do the same as me, and that is to try and sweep everything under the rug. I’ve had some real trials and struggles the last 40 years. I always pretended everything was fine, and I acted as though everything was fine, but deep inside of me, I was hurting and barely holding on. I had a break down over the issues about 10 years ago. It really frightened my husband. I finally opened up and started talking. My poor husband has become my sounding board, even though he is part of my problems (not all of them.) My struggles and trials haven’t gone away, but it helps that I don’t bottle it up inside of me. I would probably benefit from talking to a counselor, and I did have a few sessions with one, until it was no longer covered financially. Talking has helped me, but the specific trials I have will never be able to be resolved. I just need better coping skills in order to survive with some semblance of acceptance and happiness.
  2. Okay
    classylady reacted to pam in Favorite snacks?   
    I love the peanut butter with Hershey's kisses.
  3. Love
    classylady got a reaction from pam in Favorite snacks?   
    I love cookies!!! Chocolate chip, oatmeal raisin, peanut butter with choc. kisses, snickerdoodles, sugar, pumpkin choc. chip, no bake chocolate, and so on. I don’t bake like I used to, there’s no one to help me eat them anymore. I’m the only one who really likes cookies in our house. What I need to do is halve the recipes.
  4. Love
    classylady got a reaction from dprh in Hello, long time reader and poster, and I need support in a hard time   
    I’m not sure how to help. Just don’t do the same as me, and that is to try and sweep everything under the rug. I’ve had some real trials and struggles the last 40 years. I always pretended everything was fine, and I acted as though everything was fine, but deep inside of me, I was hurting and barely holding on. I had a break down over the issues about 10 years ago. It really frightened my husband. I finally opened up and started talking. My poor husband has become my sounding board, even though he is part of my problems (not all of them.) My struggles and trials haven’t gone away, but it helps that I don’t bottle it up inside of me. I would probably benefit from talking to a counselor, and I did have a few sessions with one, until it was no longer covered financially. Talking has helped me, but the specific trials I have will never be able to be resolved. I just need better coping skills in order to survive with some semblance of acceptance and happiness.
  5. Love
    classylady got a reaction from dprh in Hello, long time reader and poster, and I need support in a hard time   
    I’m not sure how to help. Just don’t do the same as me, and that is to try and sweep everything under the rug. I’ve had some real trials and struggles the last 40 years. I always pretended everything was fine, and I acted as though everything was fine, but deep inside of me, I was hurting and barely holding on. I had a break down over the issues about 10 years ago. It really frightened my husband. I finally opened up and started talking. My poor husband has become my sounding board, even though he is part of my problems (not all of them.) My struggles and trials haven’t gone away, but it helps that I don’t bottle it up inside of me. I would probably benefit from talking to a counselor, and I did have a few sessions with one, until it was no longer covered financially. Talking has helped me, but the specific trials I have will never be able to be resolved. I just need better coping skills in order to survive with some semblance of acceptance and happiness.
  6. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Vort in Prayers for a Dead Athiest   
    I pray for my deceased daughter. Just as I pray for my living children, I pray for her too. I pray for her progression beyond the grave. I pray that she may know of her son's trials and triumphs, and that she may be involved (on a spiritual basis) with her family here on earth. When I am missing her and grieving for her, I pray that she may know of my love. Just because she has passed beyond this veil, doesn't mean she isn't an integral part of my family. She is my daughter, whether living or dead. I still feel the need to pray for her.
  7. Like
    classylady reacted to Grunt in Anchors Aweigh!   
    Grunt is a term used for someone who's military occupational specialty is infantry.   Both Army and USMC have infantry, as @pam pointed out.    Crossed Rifles is the Army insignia for infantry and the infamous blue cord is awarded upon completion of training at Ft Benning.
  8. Like
    classylady reacted to pam in Anchors Aweigh!   
    My dad and my ex-husband are both retired Navy.  I worked for the Navy (as a civilian) for 18 years.  I worked in a Navy facility as the only civilian where they repaired helicopter and jet engines.  I was the supply logistics manager.  I ordered and received and kept inventory of parts needed to repair the engines.
    Plus I was Ombudsman for 3 Navy ships and on an Admiral's staff for family liaisons.  
  9. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Carborendum in Faith vs Knowledge   
    One of my favorite scriptures in the Book of Mormon is the simple quote that Helaman makes from his stripling young warriors: “We do not doubt our mothers knew it.” Those simple words are so profound to me. How did those mothers (and their fathers, grandparents, etc.) teach their young sons, that those young men did not doubt? The experiences the people of Ammon went through were so spiritual, and also traumatic (thousands killed when they would not take up arms to protect themselves). They would rather die than break their oath to lay down their weapons of war. These people, I believe, had a sure knowledge of the plan of salvation. They knew that to die is not the end, but they would be with God. To reach this knowledge, they had the witness of the Holy Ghost. That witness is the sure knowledge. If one has received that witness, there is no doubt.
    Many of these young warriors probably grew up in homes where their fathers, grandparents and even mothers had died in the massacre of their people. Along with the surviving mothers, their fathers and grandparents, also had a hand in teaching these young men. The teachings must have been done with the Spirit. That Spirit witnessed to these youth the truth. These young men did not doubt, they knew it because their mothers (and other adults in their lives) knew it. 
    For myself, when I was a missionary, I personally needed to know for myself. I couldn’t just believe. I couldn’t witness and testify of Joseph Smith unless I knew.  I poured my soul out in prayer, much like Enos in the Book of Mormon. My answer didn’t come immediately, but when it did, the spiritual witness by the Holy Ghost was so strong, that I could say “I know”, and I could say “I testify to you in the name of Jesus Christ that Joseph Smith did see God the Father and his Son Jesus Christ.” That witness has remained with me. And, because of that knowledge, and faith, there have been times in my life when I have received other personal revelation that I know I would not have otherwise received.
    Some people are blessed with the spiritual gift to know, by the power of the Holy Ghost, that Jesus is the Christ (D&C 46:13). Others are blessed to believe in their words (D&C 46:14). I believe those stripling warriors had that spiritual gift to believe in their mother’s words. And then received the gift to know it was true—all through the gift of the Holy Ghost. When we are confirmed we receive the gift of the Holy Ghost. We should try to utilize that gift by praying for the spiritual gifts we lack. There are certain gifts that I personally feel I need in my life, so I pray for those.
     
  10. Like
    classylady reacted to Anddenex in Tolerance vs inclusion.   
    Yes, that is correct, and I didn't mention it because I thought it was self-evident from your original response; however, your clarification might be good for others who are reading through the thread.
    The official Church thoughts is why I mentioned the concept of Zion where the righteous dwell and the wicked flee from (Is that inclusive in light of what Elder Cook mentioned?). It is also why I mentioned the kingdoms of glory which is official Church doctrine. We are discussing the concept of inclusion, while the most inclusive being (glorified being) will ultimately judge his offspring, his heirs, and they will be divided into kingdoms. According to the worldview, as Vort mentioned (and the OP), this isn't inclusive at all.
    Official Church doctrine is that we are to call sinners to repentance. In our worldview, modern age, to call a sinner to repentance is an act of intolerance and a lack of inclusivity of a person's chosen lifestyle. This is also why I mentioned I am confused as to the boundary of inclusion within the Church, and in the world we live in. If we truly love our children we will do all we can to keep them on the covenant path. That means we call sinners to repentance, which isn't tolerant or inclusive according to the current worldview.
  11. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in Back in 2012, classylady said:   
    -In the old ASCII character encoding, 42 represents the asterisk '*'. In many search and pattern matching algorithms, the asterisk is a "wildcard", replaceable with any character or set of characters. (In other words, "v*t" could match "vet", "vat", "violet", "violent", "vest", "vault", or "Vort".) Some people think that when Douglas Adams wrote in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy that a supercomputer found the answer to "the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything" to be 42, he was being cleverly cryptic in saying that the "meaning of life" was '*' in computer terms—that is, whatever you wanted to assign to it. A good atheistic statement of values and the meaning of existence, perhaps pessimistic and hollow by religious standards, but reasonably clever.
  12. Like
    classylady reacted to mordorbund in Benefits of marrying for time only in the temple?   
    Think not when you gather to Zion,
    Your troubles and trials are through,
    That nothing but comfort and pleasure
    Are waiting in Zion for you.
    No, no, 'tis designed as a furnace,
    All substance, all textures to try,
    To burn all the " wood, hay, and stubble, "
    The gold from the dross purify.
    Think not when you gather to Zion,
    That all will be holy and pure;
    That fraud and deception are banished,
    And confidence wholly secure.
    No, no, for the Lord our Redeemer
    Has said that the tares with the wheat
    Must grow till the great day of burning
    Shall render the harvest complete.
    Think not when you gather to Zion,
    The saints here have nothing to do
    But to look to your personal welfare,
    And always be comforting you.
    No, those who are faithful are doing
    What they find to do with their might;
    To gather the scattered of Israel
    They labor by day and by night.
    Think not when you gather to Zion,
    The prize and the victory won.
    Think not that the warfare is ended,
    The work of salvation is done.
    No, no, for the great prince of darkness
    A tenfold exertion will make,
    When he sees you go to the fountain,
    Where freely the truth you may take.
    -Eliza R. Snow
  13. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Carborendum in Faith vs Knowledge   
    One of my favorite scriptures in the Book of Mormon is the simple quote that Helaman makes from his stripling young warriors: “We do not doubt our mothers knew it.” Those simple words are so profound to me. How did those mothers (and their fathers, grandparents, etc.) teach their young sons, that those young men did not doubt? The experiences the people of Ammon went through were so spiritual, and also traumatic (thousands killed when they would not take up arms to protect themselves). They would rather die than break their oath to lay down their weapons of war. These people, I believe, had a sure knowledge of the plan of salvation. They knew that to die is not the end, but they would be with God. To reach this knowledge, they had the witness of the Holy Ghost. That witness is the sure knowledge. If one has received that witness, there is no doubt.
    Many of these young warriors probably grew up in homes where their fathers, grandparents and even mothers had died in the massacre of their people. Along with the surviving mothers, their fathers and grandparents, also had a hand in teaching these young men. The teachings must have been done with the Spirit. That Spirit witnessed to these youth the truth. These young men did not doubt, they knew it because their mothers (and other adults in their lives) knew it. 
    For myself, when I was a missionary, I personally needed to know for myself. I couldn’t just believe. I couldn’t witness and testify of Joseph Smith unless I knew.  I poured my soul out in prayer, much like Enos in the Book of Mormon. My answer didn’t come immediately, but when it did, the spiritual witness by the Holy Ghost was so strong, that I could say “I know”, and I could say “I testify to you in the name of Jesus Christ that Joseph Smith did see God the Father and his Son Jesus Christ.” That witness has remained with me. And, because of that knowledge, and faith, there have been times in my life when I have received other personal revelation that I know I would not have otherwise received.
    Some people are blessed with the spiritual gift to know, by the power of the Holy Ghost, that Jesus is the Christ (D&C 46:13). Others are blessed to believe in their words (D&C 46:14). I believe those stripling warriors had that spiritual gift to believe in their mother’s words. And then received the gift to know it was true—all through the gift of the Holy Ghost. When we are confirmed we receive the gift of the Holy Ghost. We should try to utilize that gift by praying for the spiritual gifts we lack. There are certain gifts that I personally feel I need in my life, so I pray for those.
     
  14. Like
    classylady reacted to NeuroTypical in Honoring parents, leave and cleave, and single folk   
    Back in 2008, the church was doing worldwide leadership training, and one of the talks was called "teach the pattern".  It asked the question "Why does the church place such a high emphasis on teaching the ideal situation of temple sealing to spouses and children, with intact 2 parent multigenerational families who all are active and sealed to each other, when so many individuals and families, often through no fault of their own, may never have such an ideal state?"
    For a long time, this talk was available online, and I referred to it often, because it was a good answer.  I can't for the life of me, find it anywhere any more. So I'll have to paraphrase the answer.
    The speaker relayed a story about how his mother used to sew all the family's clothes.  She relied heavily on patterns to measure and cut.  The dress pattern had been handed down to her by her mom.  If that pattern did not exist, she would have to use existing clothing to measure new shirts and dresses and whatnot.  Eventually, a copy of a copy of a copy would make a pretty lousy pair of pants.   But with the pattern, she could always do her best to measure and cut to size, and it usually turned out ok.
    God has given us the plan of happiness, and the best way to achieve it is to be born into an intact family with two righteous parents, who raise us in righteousness, and we find an eternal spouse and have children born in the covenant, and raise them in righteousness, and the cycle repeats itself.  Hardly nobody fits that bill fully.  There's always a divorce, or a falling away from the church, or an adoption, or an alcohol-fueled shootout that takes 30 federal marshals to bring down one Uncle, or something.  But it's important to understand the pattern and do our best. 
    Dang.  I wish I could find that talk.  It did a much better job than I'm able to remember and report.
  15. Like
    classylady reacted to estradling75 in Faith vs Knowledge   
    Recently in the Come Follow Me program we studied the Gifts of the Spirit.  D&C 46
    If it is a gift of the spirit "To Know" and "To believe" it seems pretty presumptuous for us to require or declare that someones "Knowing" is a false idea because they did not see with there eyes or hear with their ears... and that they Only really just believe.  It seems to deny the Gifts of the Spirit.
    On a more practical note... Using my example of the Sun Rising...  How many times do I have to see the sun rise before it is acceptable to say "I know the Sun will rise" if I do not know why?  It seems to me constant tiny confirmations adds up, but I can't say when it crosses over because its probably different for everyone.
    That being said its very possible that there are some people out there are saying "I know" when they don't... and others that doubt what they know because it did not come in some powerful ways.
     
  16. Like
    classylady reacted to mirkwood in Faith vs Knowledge   
    There are some gospel principles/doctrines that I KNOW.  I think it rather presumptuous of people to say that we cannot know some things.
  17. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in Faith vs Knowledge   
    I've often pondered on the topic of faith versus knowledge. I considered responding to the OP at some length, but I realized that my own thoughts were unclear and muddled. So instead I'll post something short, more in line with any insights I might have.
    What does it mean "to know" something? If you're a physics undergraduate, do you "know" Newton's laws? If so, what does that mean? Does it mean:
    You can recite Newton's Laws? You can explain Newton's Laws? You can use Newton's Laws to solve physics problems? You have independently derived Newton's Laws based on experimental data you have collected? You grasp the underlying physical reality of the universe that leads inexorably to Newton's Laws? The above ideas represent a progression of "knowledge". At each stage, you might be able to honestly proclaim, "I know Newton's Laws!" But being able to recite Newton's Laws is not the same level of knowledge as being able to explain them, which is certainly less than being able to use them, which is a far cry from being able to derive them, which is much less than understanding actual physical reality. And what of Einsteinian relativity? If you "know" Newton's Laws, does that mean you must reject Einstein?
    A child says, "I know my Heavenly Father loves me." If you ask him how he knows that, maybe he'll respond, "Because my parents told me." Is this not knowledge?
    A youth says, "I know my Heavenly Father loves me." If you ask him how he knows that, maybe he'll respond, "Because I have pored over my scriptures and they affirm God's love for me." Is this not knowledge?
    A young man says, ""I know my Heavenly Father loves me." If you ask him how he knows that, maybe he'll respond, "Because I have prayed sincerely, and I have dreamed and received into my heart the knowledge that God loves me." Is this not knowledge?
    A middle-aged man says, "I know my Heavenly Father loves me." If you ask him how he knows that, maybe he'll respond, "Because I have seen his love expressed in my life as I have tried to follow him." Is this not knowledge?
    An old man says, "I know my Heavenly Father loves me." If you ask him how he knows that, maybe he'll respond, "Because that is the nature of God." Is this not knowledge?
    At what point above can the boy or man honestly say in testimony, "I know God loves me"? I suggest that he can honestly proclaim that at any of the above stages. But what if he doubts God's love? Can he still honestly make the proclamation? I don't know, but I think that's a fidgety point.
    I occasionally hear people say, "A testimony is found in the bearing of it." In my younger years, I didn't really like that idea, because it violated my model of cause and effect. It seemed dishonest to me to claim a "knowledge" that only came as you said so. It seemed a form of self-deception. But as a middle-aged man, I don't agree with my younger self. I think there is wisdom in the saying.
    An easy way to encapsulate this is to claim that "faith versus knowledge" is really a continuum. But I think that's too easy, not really precise enough. Rather, I think that faith and knowledge are not merely complementary, but two sides of the same coin. Faith presupposes some level of knowledge, and you cannot gain knowledge without faith.
    Maybe I could have organized this mini-essay better. Maybe someone else can now. But those are some of my thoughts, for whatever they're worth.
  18. Like
    classylady reacted to scottyg in Faith vs Knowledge   
    Faith should eventually lead to perfect knowledge in something...whether the results are good or bad. However, in terms of spiritual things, once that knowledge is obtained the need for faith still exists...it does not just disappear or become irrelevant.
    Example 1: in the premortal existence, all knew that our Heavenly Father was God, and that His plan centered around a Savior. Amongst other reasons, undoubtedly there were some who (even though they had knowledge) lacked the faith to accept the plan laid out before them. They knowingly chose another voice over the Father's, many likely due to having little faith in Him, or the Christ that would come. Knowledge alone did them no good.
    Example 2: I, and many others, know that keeping the law of tithing brings blessings, but it still takes faith to keep this commandment throughout our lives. Even though we may pay it due to our knowledge, we are still exercising faith. Losing faith will eventually allow the natural man to take over, and a myriad of reasons (excuses) not to keep it, or any other commandment, will overpower your past knowledge.
    Once we enter in at the gate, all is not done. Enduring to the end requires faith. Contrary to what many believe, knowledge is not permanent - it can be lost when you do not use it. Spiritual knowledge usually becomes lost when faith is lost.
     
  19. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in Faith vs Knowledge   
    I have suggested more than once that faith is a multifaceted gem. In Ether, we learn that the brother of Jared "had faith no longer, for he knew, nothing doubting." Yet Acts 6:8 speaks of "Stephen, full of faith and power". Did Stephen's power come from his lack of knowledge? Clearly not. More to the point, 1 Corinthians 10:13 states that "God is faithful". Must we therefore assume that God is doubting, lacking somehow in knowledge? Absurd.
    Faithfulness is not a condition of ignorance, but of enlightenment. True, the scriptures sometimes contrast "faith" with "knowledge"; but as I've mentioned above, that is not a uniform scriptural teaching. The Lectures on Faith talk a great deal about what faith is and how it is used. Through faith, great miracles are wrought. Think of the greatest Miracle-Worker ever, and then remember Ether 12:16: "Yea, and even all they who wrought miracles wrought them by faith..."
    Faith is much  more than mere ersatz knowlege, some kind of placeholder for real understanding. Faith is power.
  20. Like
    classylady reacted to Carborendum in Faith vs Knowledge   
    You probably don't realize it.  But you're implying that these are mutually exclusive. 
    What the BoJ experienced was not merely a physical sense of God's appearance.  It was a spirit-to-spirit communication of profound and eternal truth.  It was "pure knowledge" that has little to do with sight.
    Think about it.  He saw a finger.  He KNEW it was the finger of the Lord.  How?  How does seeing "a finger" give you pure knowledge that it is the Lord's Finger? There HAD to be additional facets to the experience beyond sight alone.
    Think about it.  By the definitions you're using, how can we ever have knowledge that Jesus is our Savior?  That's not something that you can "see" with your eyes.  it is an understanding and an acceptance of a truth that can ONLY be communicated by the Spirit. 
  21. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in Significance of the name Joseph Smith   
    I've played with the nomen est omen idea on this forum before, the thought that a person's name tells his function somehow. Mostly I use it in a humorous context, but I think there are true applications of the idea. One might have to do with the name "Joseph Smith".
    Joseph was the favorite son of Israel (Jacob) and the savior of his brothers and their families. When the scriptures talk of "the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob", in every case they indicate the God of covenants. That covenant made to Abraham, that through Abraham's seed all the earth would be blessed, continued through Isaac and Jacob, and seems to have been especially prominent in Joseph. If there was one of the twelve tribes that carried on the covenant line, I think Joseph would be a strong contender for the position.
    A smith is, of course, a creator, one who takes raw materials and forges or otherwise shapes them into great works. 3 Nephi 22:16 quotes Isaiah 54:16 in telling us, "Behold, I have created the smith that bloweth the coals in the fire, and that bringeth forth an instrument for his work..."
    I don't expect anyone to take my word for it, but I strongly suspect that Joseph Smith's name was not merely foreordained, but that it was chosen because of the significance of the words that make up the name. Not to get too woo-woo or anything. It just seems the type of understated elegance that so often grace the works of God. Just an idea for consideration as anyone might see fit.
  22. Like
    classylady reacted to Hello in Sealing/Cancelation Question   
    Update. We received the letter that the cancellation was granted prior to the sealing! Yay. 
  23. Haha
    classylady reacted to Jedi_Nephite in Passed the Technician Class test for Ham Radio today   
    @classylady After reading your post, my initial response was this:
     
  24. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Jedi_Nephite in Passed the Technician Class test for Ham Radio today   
    There’s a lot of variables in choosing an antenna. Where you live, what your surroundings are, hoa/pud restrictions (legally they can’t keep you from putting up an antenna, but there might be restrictions in how high), are there power lines in the way, etc.  Will you be getting your general or extra class license to get on HF?
    My husband is working on a fan-dipole antenna for HF. He has a Kenwood TS-850S. It’s about 30 years old. I’m setting up a base station in my office with a TYT radio and a small external power supply. Probably will be using a Potkus dual band j-pole antenna. Up until now I’ve just used my handheld Baofeng UV5r with a larger battery. Occasionally I will use my husband’s base station which is a QYT 980+, a dual band uhf/vhf radio. In my car I have a BTech 25x2, with a 19 inch dual-band mag mount antenna, and my husband has a BTech 50x2 in his pickup truck with a 30 year old Larsen dual-band mag mount antenna. In Hubby’s ham shack he also has an ICOM 2340h, Kenwood TH71, a smaller 2 meter Yaesu, and can’t remember exactly how many baofengs.  I also have an old ICOM 2AT. 
  25. Like
    classylady reacted to Jedi_Nephite in Passed the Technician Class test for Ham Radio today   
    Well, I passed the Technician’s exam yesterday. 

    I ordered a Yaseu FT-60r along with a Diamond exchangeable antenna.  I plan on getting an Icom for our base station, but I’m taking more time with that as I research what I need, and how I want to set it up.