classylady

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  1. Like
    classylady got a reaction from SilentOne in Are We Overly Compelled by Church Culture and Human Tendencies to Say I Know This Church is True?   
    I admit I don’t often get up and share my testimony in Fast and Testimony Meeting. But, when I do share my testimony whether in Fast and Testimony Meeting, or in a Primary lesson, Sunday School lesson, or Relief Society lesson, I feel the responsibility that is on my shoulders. My responsibility is to teach or share with the Spirit, and to help my fellow members and/or investigators feel that Spirit. Because I do have a testimony and have felt the Spirit testify to me of the truthfulness of the gospel I feel I will have let my Savior down if I don’t testify. So, I will use the terminology “I know”, or “I testify in the name of Jesus Christ that ...”. And then I try to clarify why I know. I feel because I do know, I need to help those who are struggling. I want them to learn for themselves and know without a doubt so that when trials come their way, they have an anchor to hold on to. If they don’t know for themselves, when a a pivotal point comes in their life I hope they might remember me, Sister Classylady, and remember she knew! I hope they can hold onto my knowledge until they get their own. This is a responsibility I feel very strongly about. 
  2. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Are We Overly Compelled by Church Culture and Human Tendencies to Say I Know This Church is True?   
    I admit I don’t often get up and share my testimony in Fast and Testimony Meeting. But, when I do share my testimony whether in Fast and Testimony Meeting, or in a Primary lesson, Sunday School lesson, or Relief Society lesson, I feel the responsibility that is on my shoulders. My responsibility is to teach or share with the Spirit, and to help my fellow members and/or investigators feel that Spirit. Because I do have a testimony and have felt the Spirit testify to me of the truthfulness of the gospel I feel I will have let my Savior down if I don’t testify. So, I will use the terminology “I know”, or “I testify in the name of Jesus Christ that ...”. And then I try to clarify why I know. I feel because I do know, I need to help those who are struggling. I want them to learn for themselves and know without a doubt so that when trials come their way, they have an anchor to hold on to. If they don’t know for themselves, when a a pivotal point comes in their life I hope they might remember me, Sister Classylady, and remember she knew! I hope they can hold onto my knowledge until they get their own. This is a responsibility I feel very strongly about. 
  3. Like
    classylady reacted to Midwest LDS in A personal witness of the power of the priesthood.   
    I had an amazing experience this evening brothers and sisters. My younger sister asked me to give her a blessing. While what I said was for her ears alone, I was covered in the Holy Ghost while I was speaking to her. I've given many blessings in my life, but this one was a very special one. I knew I was speaking for God. I've always taken my blessings seriously, and have tried to feel inspired and I believe that I said what God wanted me too. But this time, like only a handful of other times in my life, I literally felt the power of the Holy Ghost descend upon me, almost like a light blanket although that description is inadequate. The holy Melchesidek priesthood is real. God has restored it through Joseph Smith, and it's power comes from our Saviour Jesus Christ. I just wanted to share that with you all this evening.
  4. Like
    classylady reacted to anatess2 in My son is opening his mission call tomorrow.   
    Whoa.,. this is gonna be tough... I can’t argue with @JohnsonJones anymore! 
    Tacloban Mission.  That city that got wiped out by a typhoon a few years ago.  He leaves in January.
  5. Like
    classylady reacted to JohnsonJones in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    I want to thank you for this, but probably from a different direction than you would normally think.
    Today has been particularly difficult for me.  I was asked earlier today to write a letter for an old acquaintance.  I first met this man in the church almost 46 years ago.  While I've known him he has done all sorts of criminal and other types of acts.  He was called as a High Priest many years prior to me, even with that type of record (and part of the reason at times I've struggle with me and others not being called High Priests when we were younger, and yet some of those who are blatantly wicked seem to be granted such things at times), and was a member of the Bishopric, something which was not blessed upon me until more recently.
    He has never felt remorse for what he has done.  He has always felt he could get away with things.  Despite all this, we have been friends.  He has helped with charity at times in helping others, and some of his actions were due to a flawed sense of morality on his part I suppose.  That said, crimes and actions finally caught up to him.  He was sent to jail and is now guilty of murder.  He is awaiting sentencing.  Some others who know him sent out messages asking for people to write character references or letters for this man. 
    I was asked if I could write a character reference for him this morning (not that it was due this morning, just asked if I would by someone today).  I immediately felt conflicted.  Instead of writing a character letter I wanted to write a letter to the judge asking for them to lock him up and toss away the key.  He still doesn't really have any remorse, the only remorse he has on this is that he finally got caught.  He had been committing adultery and in the process of events that led him to murder someone innocent.  It was simply the capstone of a long life of doing things and seemingly to get away with it.  There were other events of questionable nature in his past, including other periods of questionable indiscretion that he simply waltzed on by seemingly without being touched. 
    I was his friend, and yet here I was wanting him to have as severe a punishment as possible.  I had to ask myself, had I truly forgiven him.  Was this desire out of wanting him to pay for the crimes he was actually in prison for, or some deeper rooted grudge out of anger and frustration.  I have had a tough time trying to sort this out today.  I have had very mixed emotions and truly wanted to write a letter exactly opposite of what he wanted and send it in to hopefully make him have the harshest sentence possible.  Even if the church gave him a free pass, I suppose I wanted him to at last have some repercussions of the damage he had done to others.
    I couldn't get past this mindset today.  I've tried.  I was not making any progress.  How I could feel that towards this man who had been an acquaintance for so long, who we've kept in contact despite being in different areas for such a while was in many ways driving away the spirit at times for me today.
    We are to forgive all men, and I thought I had forgiven him a long time ago...so this was suddenly a new struggle.  Perhaps it was because I suddenly was not just expected to let him on his way, but actually write something to show that he was of good character.  It set many emotions of pain and anger inside me.  I couldn't seem to resolve it within myself.
    Then I read your post above.  Ironically, the spirit used it to talk to me.  My problem was that I had already condemned him in my heart, something I am NOT qualified to do.  I am not his judge (nor even in his church leadership).  I am not the Lord and have no right to judge, and yet, within my heart I had done so.  I know this man probably has no remorse about his actual crimes and sins, but it is not my place to decide whether he's condemned or not in this life.  It is the Savior's and as you have posted, the Savior (as far as I know) has not condemned the man in this life either.  It is up to the man whether he will actually repent at some point or not, but it is simply my place to try to truly forgive him for any offense that I may have seen done.  In this my sin was that I was not as forgiving as I should have been.  Instead I wanted justice and to a small degree, I suppose revenge.  That is not the Lord's way.
    AS I realized this, I had a huge burden taken off my heart and I now realize I don't have to feel these feelings towards him.  I don't plan on writing a letter on his behalf, but I don't have the desire anymore to write a letter asking for a harsh judgment either.  I am happy to allow whatever happens, to happen.  If his friends and family write letters to soften his sentence, so be it.  I can continue to write the man letters in jail to show our friendship, and to visit him occasionally, but there is no need for me to feel anger or frustration over this issue any longer.  I should leave it in the Lord's hands as I should have all along, and let the Lord handle it as he will.  If the Lord forgives the man to exaltation, then I should be happy for the man, and if instead the man suffers for what he has done or pays the price, I should also accept what the Lord wills in the matter to be done.
    So, I know you posted it probably as a different matter, but your post helped open the way for the Spirit to help me overcome a great struggle I was having today.  I thank you for the post that you made.
  6. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in One of the most beautiful love poems I have ever read   
    The story goes that Thomas Moore, the famous 19th-century Irish poet and composer, married a beautiful woman named Elizabeth who contracted smallpox. She survived the dread disease, but as was common with smallpox survivors, was left badly scarred. She subsequently locked herself in her room, refusing to come out for shame of her face being so disfigured. Thomas then wrote this poem to reassure her. I hope the story is true; it's a nice story, in any case. This is one of a few poems I have actually bothered to commit to memory. 
    Believe me, if all those endearing young charms
    Which I gaze on so fondly today
    Were to change by tomorrow and fleet in mine arms,
    Like fairy gifts fading away,
    Thou wouldst still be ador'd as this moment thou art,
    Let thy loveliness fade as it will;
    And around the dear ruin, each wish of my heart
    Would entwine itself verdantly still.
    It is not while beauty and youth are thine own
    And thy cheeks unprofan'd by a tear
    That the fervor and faith of a soul can be known
    To which time will but make thee more dear.
    No, the heart that has truly lov'd never forgets,
    But as truly loves on to the close
    As the sunflower turns on her god, when he sets,
    The same look which she turned when he rose.
    (For those my age or older, this might seem familiar if you hear the tune the song has traditionally been set to. Think Saturday morning cartoons.)
     
  7. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Grunt in Keeping the Sabbath Day Holy   
    Here’s a few things we do: Attend church. Usually stay home after church and try to take a nap—especially now since we’re older and have less energy. Read. Some Sundays we visit extended family. Try to have family dinner. I like to do family history on Sundays. We used to have a Family Home Evening lesson on Sunday when the kids were young.

    We don’t shop on Sundays! Nor do recreational activities like swimming, fairs, amusement parks, or attend movies or plays. We also did not have friends birthday parties for the kids. We might do birthday cake with family only, but never a friends bash. We also don’t do yard work on Sunday.
  8. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Women and children as witnesses   
    I wish I could remember exactly what he said. We were asked not to record, video tape, or take photographs. He talked about how so many in Africa only have one meal a day. The average length of life for men is around 44 years of age. He mentioned AIDS being one of the causes of the young death rate. They live in very small houses, perhaps one room, often caring not only for their own family, but often the children of their brother because he has died. The young men (and women) are needed to help support the family. If they go on missions that financial support is not there. And, as I mentioned earlier, some of these young men and women are the only members.
    As to fast offerings, he didn’t say much more than, here they are, poorest of poor, hungry, how they give of their meager earnings—pennies, nickels, and need food and basics to survive, and in Utah some are unwise with their income and now need help in paying their mortgage using fast offering money. I think he was trying to portray the huge difference in needs and wants. It sounded like he said these poor saints are willing to help us in Utah, and it’s usually due to our unwise decisions, yet they need the very basics.
  9. Thanks
    classylady got a reaction from Anddenex in Women and children as witnesses   
    I wish I could remember exactly what he said. We were asked not to record, video tape, or take photographs. He talked about how so many in Africa only have one meal a day. The average length of life for men is around 44 years of age. He mentioned AIDS being one of the causes of the young death rate. They live in very small houses, perhaps one room, often caring not only for their own family, but often the children of their brother because he has died. The young men (and women) are needed to help support the family. If they go on missions that financial support is not there. And, as I mentioned earlier, some of these young men and women are the only members.
    As to fast offerings, he didn’t say much more than, here they are, poorest of poor, hungry, how they give of their meager earnings—pennies, nickels, and need food and basics to survive, and in Utah some are unwise with their income and now need help in paying their mortgage using fast offering money. I think he was trying to portray the huge difference in needs and wants. It sounded like he said these poor saints are willing to help us in Utah, and it’s usually due to our unwise decisions, yet they need the very basics.
  10. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Midwest LDS in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  11. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Anddenex in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  12. Like
    classylady got a reaction from MrShorty in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  13. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  14. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Vort in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  15. Like
    classylady got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Women and children as witnesses   
    I was at a German Mission reunion last night for all German speaking missions.  Elder Bednar and his wife spoke to us and he specifically touched on this topic. He asked us to please stop with the myths, etc. that so many of us adhere to. He said the policy changes such as witnesses, ministering, youth program, missionaries able to call home on a weekly basis, etc. are because we are a world wide church. It needs to be simplified, but the eternal truths are there. It needs to be family based. For example, he talked about Africa, and the growth there. Young adults  have the obligation to care for their parents and support the family. Often times, the young person is the only member. If they go on a mission they are unable to to help support the family. If they have no contact with the parents for the two years while serving, the parents become more antagonistic towards the church. The change in policy for missionaries to call home was for them, not us (Utahns, Americans), but we benefit. I wish I could state this the way Elder Bednar did.
    He talked about the Saints in Africa who are the poorest in the world. They pay their pennies and other meager change for fast offerings, which goes into the coffers of the church, so someone here in Utah can pay their mortgage because they were unwise with their money, He was blunt.
    He talked about revelation and how it is often given, line upon line, precept upon precept. Most of the church policy changes are not abrupt changes. Each particular prophet has been working for years in specific areas of their stewardship. These are not new ideas to them, but it comes line upon line. 

    I’m grateful I was able to hear Elder Bednar talk. The Spirit was so strong. His wife’s comments were just as powerful. I truly feel blessed to have been there.
  16. Like
    classylady reacted to estradling75 in Women and children as witnesses   
    Indeed..  We have Culture, or the Unwritten Order of things... Which I think is very similar to what the scripture call 'Traditions of our Fathers'  This is not doctrine or truth...  It might however have been a good idea or helpful or even necessary at some point in our history. And maybe it still is or maybe it is not any more.  It is nice to see those with the proper stewardship going through and removing that which they determine is no longer useful or correct at this time
  17. Like
    classylady reacted to The Folk Prophet in Goodbye   
    For those of you who asked for the update, we're having a little boy.
  18. Like
    classylady reacted to prisonchaplain in Suicide and the Law of Chastity   
    I do not like this scenario. Individual is suicidal, but fornication saved his/her life. Hey church member...can you blame me for saving a life???!!! Oh, don't try to say that there were other options--"literally no other option." So...if I say it was wrong it's like I'm wishing the person dead. If I say it was right, of course I am admitting that the Law of Chastity (or prohibition on premarital sex) is wrong.
    That's the setup. Perhaps it was unintended. Maybe the OP is asking a sincere question--there really might be the belief that sex before marriage prevented a suicide. If so, though I was not there, I reject this false dichotomy. Either the suicide could have been delayed/prevented in other (better) ways, or this person simply has not completed the act yet. The vast majority of suicides are cries of pain...calls for help. Compounding such suffering with an added sin ... well, if this soul does end up healed it will be God's mercy--NOT the sexual immorality--that turned the situation around.
  19. Like
    classylady reacted to JohnsonJones in Ezra Taft Benson was right.   
    Many Decades ago Ezra Taft Benson was our Prophet.  He pushed for us to read the Book of Mormon more.  We had multiple lessons on the importance of the Book of Mormon and how it was the keystone to our religion.  He told us that we need to make it a focus of our lives.
     
    The Book of Mormon Keystone of Our religion - Ezra Taft Benson Octo 1986 Conf
    I've noticed all sorts of commentary by those who have fallen away from the church pertaining to leaders, policies and church history that creates doubts and confusion with people.  However, when it comes to the Book of Mormon they normally attack the sources of translation (Joseph Smiths Character) or try to mock it in relation to history, but the eternal truths that are found within are normally not the targets (with one exception that they focus on the wording) of their derision. 
    It seems to me that those who have a sound testimony of the Book of Mormon and an unwavering faith that it is true are not going to be dissuaded by many of the other obstacles tossed at us today.  When people bring up (normally from questionable sources, though most ironically don't question sources these days) so called facts to tear down the church, it's history, or it's founding leaders (Joseph Smith, Brigham Young or other prophets and apostles in Church history), I find that a stout testimony of the Book of Mormon is a strong fortress against the winds of those who would tear one away from the gospel.
    This summer I travelled and did not bring a Book of Mormon with me.  It was a time when I had many discussions about the Church with those who were not members.  Some of them were a little antagonistic at times, and I truly missed the opportunity to read the Book of Mormon regularly.  From that I can say that the Book of Mormon is absolutely necessary for us today, and that even a little reading is something that can bolster us up against the storms far more than many other resources we may think of.  I can say I am very grateful to be able to read the Book of Mormon today and feel it truly helps out testimonies.  Even when we feel we are solid and strong with our testimonies, I feel the reading of the Book of Mormon bolsters it even more strongly than if we weren't.
    I think today there is a lack of emphasis of the Book of Mormon in the Church.  As members have gotten side tracked on other things in their lives, including many various things dealing with various items at church, that the Book of Mormon has been neglected in many instances.  I've found that many who fall away were not reading the Book of Mormon regularly, or when crisis came with their faith, they fell to reading other things rather than the Book of Mormon.  Perhaps not all, but many of them may have found the sweet whisperings of the Spirit if they had but turned more fervently to the Book of Mormon and prayed for a restoration of their testimony.  I think there is a lack among many of our young people today in studying the Book of Mormon and I think that could be hurting many of them in keeping those testimonies in the face of an ever increasing hostile world.
    The thing that sparked this post is in reference to this summer and now, I notice a difference in my life between when I am reading and studying the Book of Mormon and when I am not.  It has convinced me even more strongly of it's importance in our lives.  I think that in light of the many things being tossed at the church and it's members today, a reinvigorated focus on keeping the Book of Mormon in our daily lives could be an important step in trying to keep our younger members, those who are troubled, and those who are in the midst of confusion to retain their testimonies, or gain a testimony of the Gospel in the face of a very hostile world.
  20. Like
    classylady reacted to pam in Third Hour forum get together   
    Here ya go:

  21. Like
    classylady got a reaction from beefche in Third Hour forum get together   
    I’m glad you misread your itinerary. It was fun meeting you!
  22. Like
    classylady reacted to anatess2 in And they all found joy and peace   
    This was a good interview in my opinion.  I like that the interviewers asked the questions most people have but may not have the courage to.
     
  23. Like
    classylady reacted to Grunt in Missionaries   
    What I do love, however, is that even though my wife doesn't care for this calling, she puts everything into making it the most fun, and educational, class for the kids.  She even makes sure she gets the things she doesn't have a testimony of 100% accurate.  She's awesome.
  24. Like
    classylady reacted to Vort in Why Women Don’t Wear Pants to Church   
    In this and every other Christian church that has been around for more than a century or so, the tradition was that people come to communal Sunday worship services wearing what they called their "Sunday best". In a historical context, people living, say, 150 years ago typically owned several sets of clothing, including work clothing that got muddy and wet, warm clothing and a coat for cold weather, possibly lighter and more comfortable wear for relaxing at home or outdoors, and usually a set of "nice" clothes to wear to important social events (and to church). If you were wealthy and owned e.g. a ball gown or a smoking jacket, it would be considered ostentatious and in very poor taste to wear such an outfit to church. Similarly, if you could not be bothered to kick the pig manure off your boots before coming to church, that would be considered disrespectful. This was a basic societal convention understood by all: When you go to church, you wear your Sunday best.
    In a more modern context, textiles have become so amazingly inexpensive that even poor people usually own many sets of clothing, perhaps a closetful (or more). But along with this bounty has come, strangely enough, a coarsening of standards of dress, such that many (dare I say, most) churches today have few or no expectations for how their congregation dresses, except maybe that they DO dress. (I'm sure there are California congregations where even this is optional, perhaps frowned upon.) T-shirts and demin jeans with holes are de rigeur. You would not attend your sister's wedding reception dressed in rags, but apparently it's fine to attend a communal worship service of the Savior dressed like that.
    Women wearing pants is something that has come about largely in my lifetime. I'm sure women did wear pants before I was born—I've seen enough '50s movies to confirm that the idea was not utterly alien to them—but it seems like it was the '70s when the women's pantsuit carved out its niche. So at this point, it's hardly new, but also hardly traditional.
    I'm sure there are some people, probably mostly women, who insist that a woman wear a dress to church, and that anything else is unacceptable, even sacrilege. But I don't know any of them, or if I do, I don't know that I know any of them. In general, few people seem to care much what women wear to church; as others have pointed out, men are expected to follow a far stricter dress and grooming code (official or otherwise) than women
    So here's the complaint. It's not that a woman DARE to wear PANTS to Church—how awful! No. It's fundamentally that the women involved are doing their best to stick their metaphorical middle finger at Church conventions and those Saints who find them valuable. It's like a four-year-old's tantrums, but carried out by adults who are supposed to be helping carry the load and move the work along. And when, on top of that, they proclaim that this is all about letting women have their choice—they're lying (or incredibly foolish). No one believes them except for children who don't know any better and those who already share their beliefs.
    tl;dr—No one cares if women wear pants to Church, but the Purple Pants People are looking to sow discord. That's the problem.
  25. Like
    classylady reacted to Just_A_Guy in Why Women Don’t Wear Pants to Church   
    Sister Coppersmith was probably fifteen (or younger) when the whole “wear pants to church” thing was going on.  I’m not going to call her a brazen liar; but I don’t see how I can avoid describing this column as “staggeringly, stupendously ignorant; especially for a BYU English major and a published author”.  A simple Google search would have taken her to a New York Times article confirming that the stunt was not a general, innocuous call for inclusiveness; it was a premeditated protest against Church policy, practice, and doctrine.
    When you do the same crap that highly-visible rebels deliberately do as an outward token of their rebellion, you get associated with rebels.  It’s why men still can’t wear beards at BYU fifty years after Woodstock, for Pete’s sake.  
    I will also note that Sister Smith’s slap at the women of this Church who choose to wear dresses to Sunday services, is likely not the sort of thing she’d dare to say to any of their faces in a Relief Society meeting or any other real-life interpersonal encounter. 
    As far as MGF’s publishing slant goes:  I will merely note that AskGramps is still recruiting authors who actually love and understand (or sincerely want to understand) LDS teaching, practice, and culture and are willing to speak in the Church’s defense.  PM @pam if you’re interested in helping out.