Anddenex

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  1. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Just_A_Guy in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    It's not
     
     
    Sin is still sin, no matter how much we choose to emotionally invest ourselves in it and no matter how petulantly we lash out at loved ones who won't give their blessing to our behavior.
     
    At the final judgment,  no one will look back at their gay wedding day as a happy occasion.  Quite to the contrary--they will view it as a colossal mistake; and more than few of 'em might kinda wonder why their Mormon friends didn't seem to understand that at the time and soothed their itching ears with drawls of "well, it's not thaaaat bad . . ."
     
    This is a tricky situation with no easy answers; and it's interesting to me that some posters here seem to actually want to browbeat the OP into doing what they think he ought to do rather than simply encouraging him to rely on the Spirit.
  2. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Leah in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    But if someone has actually sought an answer from our Heavenly Father, why are they asking strangers on the Internet?
    I suspect that a lot of the time people post these kinds of questions is because they are seeking validation of a decision they have already made. As though some stranger on the Internet giving their approval automatically makes it okay...whatever "it" is. Because you are guaranteed - no matter what the question or the church's teaching - you are going to find someone that says it is okay.
    If the decision has been made, why not turn to the Lord for confirmation instead of the Internet?
    I think that being in the wedding party of a gay wedding is a whole other level of support as opposed to being a guest. And that is all I am going to say about that as I don't really care to engage in the condemnation from members of the church who would call me bigoted or un-Christlike. It's getting to be more and more that members of the church are no different from the rest of the world in being intolerant of those who have a more conservative or different viewpoint than theirs....even when those viewpoints are in line with the Gospel, with church teachings, or the guidance of our prophets and leaders.
  3. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Just_A_Guy in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    With all due respect, there are also real pedophiles you know.  They really do exist.  They are real people.  I've met them, I've worked with them, I've wept and prayed with them.
     
    The point is not that people who are attracted to people of the same gender--or to adolescents--are less human than anyone else.  It is that they are just as human as anyone else--but we still aren't "bigoted" or "intolerant" or "bad friends" if we refuse to support those of their actions we consider to be morally reprehensible.
  4. Like
    Anddenex reacted to The Folk Prophet in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    Which way do you face?
  5. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Just_A_Guy in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    I heartily endorse Estradling's suggestion to follow the Spirit.
     
    That said:  I would be suspicious of anyone who suggested that I ought to go as a matter of "tolerance".  Would you consider yourself morally required to attend the wedding and serve as best man, if your friend were marrying a thirteen-year-old girl rather than a male?  Of course not.  You might well choose to attend and participate, I suppose; but it would be a churlish friend indeed who, understanding your own conflicting values, demanded it.
     
    Again--I'm not saying, positively, that you shouldn't go.  I just think you should maybe be a little wary of the societal pressures suggesting that you should.  Like Estradling says--wrestle it out with the Lord and have the courage to do what the Spirit tells you to do.
  6. Like
    Anddenex reacted to estradling75 in My gay best friend wants me to attend his wedding   
    You are asking for opinions so you are going to get lots of opinions...  But those opinions are by their very nature based on what the opinion giver thinks and feels, and reasons...
     
    They can be good for helping you consider things in ways you haven't before.  But the only opinion that really matter, the only opinion you should seek to follow... Is Christ's.   Get on your knees and pray...  Wrestle with it if necessary.  When you believe God approves of your choice then act on it whatever it might be.
  7. Like
    Anddenex reacted to The Folk Prophet in What is the Advantage?   
    Having faith is a choice.
  8. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Windseeker in What is the Advantage?   
    It's interesting that I've never ever heard a convert say, "I'm so glad I found the gospel later in life so that I could enjoy a stress free period in life where I didn't know the  commandments". A matter of fact it's always "I wish I would have known about he Church sooner". 
     
    So maybe you should ask yourself. why that is. 
     
    If you can't recognize the blessings and benefits of living the gospel then perhaps your doing it wrong.
     
    Edit.
     
    And one more thing, I have a hard time believing people who go thru life without attempting to find meaning or purpose won't experience a measure of accountability for ignoring the most fundamental question. 
     
    In my experience age brings wisdom and perspective, dying young is a tragedy. Experience is how we progress and those who exit life early by being reckless,  don't learn in this life or reject what they learn, have set themselves further back on their journey.
  9. Like
    Anddenex got a reaction from pam in Women sealed to more than one husband   
    Pam, your understanding is the way I have understood the practice.  
     
    It really doesn't matter what Joseph Smith or Brigham Young had done as things change regarding practices (9th AoF).
  10. Like
    Anddenex reacted to pam in Women sealed to more than one husband   
    My understanding has always been that a woman could be sealed to more than one man as long as all are deceased and as long as they were married during life.  Is my misunderstanding incorrect or has something changed on this?
  11. Like
    Anddenex reacted to mordorbund in Celestial kingdom and marriage...   
    My counsel:
     
    1. Read D&C 132 about the principles of a temple sealing. Do any of these blessings motivate you?
    You are promised that, if faithful, your relationship with your spouse is recognized by God and will continue into the eternities. You and your wife will be "together forever" as the hymn phrases it. You will continue to experience the joys of fatherhood into the eternities where you will "have an increase". You become an heir to the blessings of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. At baptism you were "adopted in" (if you weren't a natural descendant); when you received your patriarchal blessing your lineage was declared; when you are sealed in the temple you are promised a patriarchal inheritance.  
    2. Go on a mission and meet with part-member families. See how their children and grandchildren view the Church and the gospel. Weigh these experiences in mind when you return to the world of dating.
     
    3. Read my signature.
  12. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Connie in how can we tell good from evil   
    We mortals sure are experts at muddying the water.  We insist on stirring up the black and white until there are so many varying shades of grey.  Ultimately, it is Christ who knows all and who is the perfect judge.  We have to do the best we can with the knowledge we have—realizing that we don’t know everything the way that God does.  We rely on the Spirit, let time reveal what it will, and sometimes have to simply say “let God judge between me and thee.”  We, and everyone else, will be judged on the knowledge we have and what we do with that knowledge as well as the thoughts and intents of our heart.
  13. Like
    Anddenex got a reaction from mordorbund in Exaltation Implications   
    In order to be frank, I have always been amazed by the sheer irony of inviting a Christian to read and pray, and the hesitation this invitation excites and the excuses provided (i.e. The Holy Bible never says to pray about spiritual truths or confirmatory bias) as reasons to reject the invitation.  
     
    Confirmation bias is especially promulgated by Atheist’s (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism/essays/nothing-fails-like-prayer/) with regards to prayer in general as they specify, “Across the world, billions of believers are praying millions of prayers each day; it is hardly surprising that some of them come true just by chance.” Thus, when a Christian (one who professes to believe in prayer) uses the same logic — I esteem it to be ironic.  If a prayer leads to confirmatory bias then the prayer wasn’t sincere indeed.
     
    The object of prayer (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/bd/prayer?lang=eng&letter=p) is thus provided, “Prayer is the act by which the will of the Father and the will of the child are brought into correspondence with each other. The object of prayer is not to change the will of God but to secure for ourselves and for others blessings that God is already willing to grant but that are made conditional on our asking for them.” If one is seeking to confirm what they already believe to be true, then they aren’t approaching our Father in heaven with sincerity and to align their will with Gods.  They go before God like the hypocrites with itching ears as provided in our New Testament (2 Timothy 4:3; https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/2-tim/4.3?lang=eng#2), “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears;” (emphasis added).
     
    On the other hand, an individual who has studied, researched, and has felt something to be true and then kneels before their Lord in prayer and humbly petitions (not hoping to be confirmed but to either be confirmed or rejected), “Through my studies, through my personal research, I believe this to be true, is this true?” is different than what I heard on my mission, “Lord, I already know the Book of Mormon is not true, but I have been asked to pray about it; so…I am praying to know if it is true.”  Not surprising this individual returned with a “Yep, it isn’t true and I prayed about it”; although, they never read the Book of Mormon with any real intent and sincerity as we asked, “Did you read the Book of Mormon?” — “No.”
     
    My father, when initially introduced to the missionaries (as a young men in his twenties) visited with them for a few weeks.  He woke up one day and decided that when the missionaries come over today I will not invite them in and specify that the Church wasn’t for him.  One of the missionaries provided a promise and that the promise would be fulfilled come Sunday (one week).  My father considered there would be no harm in accepting the invitation and promise believing, come Sunday, the promise would be left unfulfilled and he would be rid of the missionaries. Sunday approached, Sunday came, Sunday went and a few weeks later my father was baptized.  I don’t see any confirmatory bias with the experience of my father’s conversion and prayer. 
     
    However, I believe Joseph Smith’s explanation (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/pgp/js-h/1.10,13?lang=eng#9) of the first vision is the best example of how to approach God regarding the invitation to pray when he explained, “In the midst of this war of words and tumult of opinions [which obviously occurs today still], I often said to myself: What is to be done? Who of all these parties are right; or, are they all wrong together? If any one of them be right, which is it, and how shall I know it?” Joseph Smith continues, “At length I came to the conclusion that I must either remain in darkness and confusion, or else I must do as James directs, that is, ask of God.”
     
    Let’s actually provide an example in this thread alone regarding different interpretations of the same scripture as I quote you in response to SpiritDragon, “Also, The First Corinthians quote there is taken a bit out of context….” Is this a personal bias to confirm your current theological belief, or is the interpretation provided by LDS prophets and members correct?  Who better to confirm truth then God, or will I come to the truth by listening to the arm of flesh argue their interpretation and why their interpretation is correct?  As for me, the answer is simple, I will study it out myself and then ask God who has promised to answer prayers and whom will not deceive me.
     
    As pertaining to the Atheist dogma mentioned regarding prayer in general as a confirmatory bias, I often view this promulgated through this avenue: A family prays their daughter will be healed when sick.  The daughter is healed and feels better.  The family praises God.  The Atheist however profanes, “The doctors did all the work and look at these simple minded folk giving praise to God instead of giving praise to real people who saved their daughter — there was no miracle.” If you have had a prayer answered then you already know you can pray with a sincere heart and with real intent to align your will with God’s will and he will answer.  When a son/daughter of God seeks to align their will with God’s will confirmatory bias is removed because the son/daughter is less concerned with being right and more concerned with honoring their God.
  14. Like
    Anddenex got a reaction from Vort in Exaltation Implications   
    In order to be frank, I have always been amazed by the sheer irony of inviting a Christian to read and pray, and the hesitation this invitation excites and the excuses provided (i.e. The Holy Bible never says to pray about spiritual truths or confirmatory bias) as reasons to reject the invitation.  
     
    Confirmation bias is especially promulgated by Atheist’s (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism/essays/nothing-fails-like-prayer/) with regards to prayer in general as they specify, “Across the world, billions of believers are praying millions of prayers each day; it is hardly surprising that some of them come true just by chance.” Thus, when a Christian (one who professes to believe in prayer) uses the same logic — I esteem it to be ironic.  If a prayer leads to confirmatory bias then the prayer wasn’t sincere indeed.
     
    The object of prayer (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/bd/prayer?lang=eng&letter=p) is thus provided, “Prayer is the act by which the will of the Father and the will of the child are brought into correspondence with each other. The object of prayer is not to change the will of God but to secure for ourselves and for others blessings that God is already willing to grant but that are made conditional on our asking for them.” If one is seeking to confirm what they already believe to be true, then they aren’t approaching our Father in heaven with sincerity and to align their will with Gods.  They go before God like the hypocrites with itching ears as provided in our New Testament (2 Timothy 4:3; https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/2-tim/4.3?lang=eng#2), “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears;” (emphasis added).
     
    On the other hand, an individual who has studied, researched, and has felt something to be true and then kneels before their Lord in prayer and humbly petitions (not hoping to be confirmed but to either be confirmed or rejected), “Through my studies, through my personal research, I believe this to be true, is this true?” is different than what I heard on my mission, “Lord, I already know the Book of Mormon is not true, but I have been asked to pray about it; so…I am praying to know if it is true.”  Not surprising this individual returned with a “Yep, it isn’t true and I prayed about it”; although, they never read the Book of Mormon with any real intent and sincerity as we asked, “Did you read the Book of Mormon?” — “No.”
     
    My father, when initially introduced to the missionaries (as a young men in his twenties) visited with them for a few weeks.  He woke up one day and decided that when the missionaries come over today I will not invite them in and specify that the Church wasn’t for him.  One of the missionaries provided a promise and that the promise would be fulfilled come Sunday (one week).  My father considered there would be no harm in accepting the invitation and promise believing, come Sunday, the promise would be left unfulfilled and he would be rid of the missionaries. Sunday approached, Sunday came, Sunday went and a few weeks later my father was baptized.  I don’t see any confirmatory bias with the experience of my father’s conversion and prayer. 
     
    However, I believe Joseph Smith’s explanation (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/pgp/js-h/1.10,13?lang=eng#9) of the first vision is the best example of how to approach God regarding the invitation to pray when he explained, “In the midst of this war of words and tumult of opinions [which obviously occurs today still], I often said to myself: What is to be done? Who of all these parties are right; or, are they all wrong together? If any one of them be right, which is it, and how shall I know it?” Joseph Smith continues, “At length I came to the conclusion that I must either remain in darkness and confusion, or else I must do as James directs, that is, ask of God.”
     
    Let’s actually provide an example in this thread alone regarding different interpretations of the same scripture as I quote you in response to SpiritDragon, “Also, The First Corinthians quote there is taken a bit out of context….” Is this a personal bias to confirm your current theological belief, or is the interpretation provided by LDS prophets and members correct?  Who better to confirm truth then God, or will I come to the truth by listening to the arm of flesh argue their interpretation and why their interpretation is correct?  As for me, the answer is simple, I will study it out myself and then ask God who has promised to answer prayers and whom will not deceive me.
     
    As pertaining to the Atheist dogma mentioned regarding prayer in general as a confirmatory bias, I often view this promulgated through this avenue: A family prays their daughter will be healed when sick.  The daughter is healed and feels better.  The family praises God.  The Atheist however profanes, “The doctors did all the work and look at these simple minded folk giving praise to God instead of giving praise to real people who saved their daughter — there was no miracle.” If you have had a prayer answered then you already know you can pray with a sincere heart and with real intent to align your will with God’s will and he will answer.  When a son/daughter of God seeks to align their will with God’s will confirmatory bias is removed because the son/daughter is less concerned with being right and more concerned with honoring their God.
  15. Like
    Anddenex got a reaction from SpiritDragon in Exaltation Implications   
    In order to be frank, I have always been amazed by the sheer irony of inviting a Christian to read and pray, and the hesitation this invitation excites and the excuses provided (i.e. The Holy Bible never says to pray about spiritual truths or confirmatory bias) as reasons to reject the invitation.  
     
    Confirmation bias is especially promulgated by Atheist’s (http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism/essays/nothing-fails-like-prayer/) with regards to prayer in general as they specify, “Across the world, billions of believers are praying millions of prayers each day; it is hardly surprising that some of them come true just by chance.” Thus, when a Christian (one who professes to believe in prayer) uses the same logic — I esteem it to be ironic.  If a prayer leads to confirmatory bias then the prayer wasn’t sincere indeed.
     
    The object of prayer (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/bd/prayer?lang=eng&letter=p) is thus provided, “Prayer is the act by which the will of the Father and the will of the child are brought into correspondence with each other. The object of prayer is not to change the will of God but to secure for ourselves and for others blessings that God is already willing to grant but that are made conditional on our asking for them.” If one is seeking to confirm what they already believe to be true, then they aren’t approaching our Father in heaven with sincerity and to align their will with Gods.  They go before God like the hypocrites with itching ears as provided in our New Testament (2 Timothy 4:3; https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/2-tim/4.3?lang=eng#2), “For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears;” (emphasis added).
     
    On the other hand, an individual who has studied, researched, and has felt something to be true and then kneels before their Lord in prayer and humbly petitions (not hoping to be confirmed but to either be confirmed or rejected), “Through my studies, through my personal research, I believe this to be true, is this true?” is different than what I heard on my mission, “Lord, I already know the Book of Mormon is not true, but I have been asked to pray about it; so…I am praying to know if it is true.”  Not surprising this individual returned with a “Yep, it isn’t true and I prayed about it”; although, they never read the Book of Mormon with any real intent and sincerity as we asked, “Did you read the Book of Mormon?” — “No.”
     
    My father, when initially introduced to the missionaries (as a young men in his twenties) visited with them for a few weeks.  He woke up one day and decided that when the missionaries come over today I will not invite them in and specify that the Church wasn’t for him.  One of the missionaries provided a promise and that the promise would be fulfilled come Sunday (one week).  My father considered there would be no harm in accepting the invitation and promise believing, come Sunday, the promise would be left unfulfilled and he would be rid of the missionaries. Sunday approached, Sunday came, Sunday went and a few weeks later my father was baptized.  I don’t see any confirmatory bias with the experience of my father’s conversion and prayer. 
     
    However, I believe Joseph Smith’s explanation (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/pgp/js-h/1.10,13?lang=eng#9) of the first vision is the best example of how to approach God regarding the invitation to pray when he explained, “In the midst of this war of words and tumult of opinions [which obviously occurs today still], I often said to myself: What is to be done? Who of all these parties are right; or, are they all wrong together? If any one of them be right, which is it, and how shall I know it?” Joseph Smith continues, “At length I came to the conclusion that I must either remain in darkness and confusion, or else I must do as James directs, that is, ask of God.”
     
    Let’s actually provide an example in this thread alone regarding different interpretations of the same scripture as I quote you in response to SpiritDragon, “Also, The First Corinthians quote there is taken a bit out of context….” Is this a personal bias to confirm your current theological belief, or is the interpretation provided by LDS prophets and members correct?  Who better to confirm truth then God, or will I come to the truth by listening to the arm of flesh argue their interpretation and why their interpretation is correct?  As for me, the answer is simple, I will study it out myself and then ask God who has promised to answer prayers and whom will not deceive me.
     
    As pertaining to the Atheist dogma mentioned regarding prayer in general as a confirmatory bias, I often view this promulgated through this avenue: A family prays their daughter will be healed when sick.  The daughter is healed and feels better.  The family praises God.  The Atheist however profanes, “The doctors did all the work and look at these simple minded folk giving praise to God instead of giving praise to real people who saved their daughter — there was no miracle.” If you have had a prayer answered then you already know you can pray with a sincere heart and with real intent to align your will with God’s will and he will answer.  When a son/daughter of God seeks to align their will with God’s will confirmatory bias is removed because the son/daughter is less concerned with being right and more concerned with honoring their God.
  16. Like
    Anddenex reacted to The Folk Prophet in What do you do in PEC?   
    From Introduction to Handbook 2 and Related Principles by Quentin L. Cook
     
    Some bishops have asked if there is a clear distinction between what should be addressed in PEC meetings and what should be discussed with the ward council. The general answer is set forth in sections 4.3 and 4.4. The PEC meets regularly to consider priesthood matters, such as quorum priesthood responsibilities, ordinances and blessings, callings and releases, certain temple and missionary items, and administering Church discipline. Generally, the PEC need not discuss matters that will be reviewed by the ward council. “However, it may be beneficial for the PEC to preview some matters that will be on the ward council’s agenda” (Handbook 2, 4.3). On the other hand, the ward council typically discusses matters that benefit from coordination and discussion and are of general concern for the ward as a whole. Participation from all council members, especially the sisters, is essential if the revelatory potential is to be achieved. The bishop may determine that a decision is appropriate at the end of the ward council discussion, or he may feel inspired to make the decision at a subsequent bishopric or PEC meeting. While a bright line of distinction between the two councils is not intended, three principal objectives may give bishops guidance in determining whether to utilize the PEC or ward council: • First, decrease the burden on bishoprics.• Second, increase delegation and revelation through councils.• Third, avoid regimentation that interferes with inspiration. We also pray that common sense and guidance from the Spirit will prevail.
  17. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Palerider in Book of Abraham   
    I personally love the Pearl of Great Price and I love the book of Abraham. My wife and I read and studied the Pearl of Great Price and learned to love it even more. I hope more members take the time to read and study it.
  18. Like
    Anddenex got a reaction from SpiritDragon in Ying and Yang   
    This discussion enticed me to read a little bit more regarding yinyang and its basic tenets.  Three tenets I found to be very interesting: 
    Yinyang has no “valuational hierarchy, as if yin could be abstracted from yang (or vice versa), regarded as superior or considered metaphysically separated and distinct.” Yinyang is described in terms of “excess” and “deficiency”.  Where there is excess in yin, causing deficiency in yang (vice-versa) the result is always confusion and calamity. Yin refers to “a closed door, darkness and the south bank of a river and the north side of a mountain.” Yang refers to “height, brightness and the south side of a mountain.” At first thought, I also didn’t think physicality and spirituality were complements; however, upon further thought I am leaning more toward what Crypto mentioned:
     
    “For man is spirit. The elements are eternal, and spirit and element, inseparably connected, receive a fulness of joy.”
     
    Physical matter seen by the naked eye in contrast to spiritual matter which are more fine and pure.  A deficiency of a spiritual element (body) lead to fallen man and then an increase toward becoming Godlike (the spirit and element connected eternally).
     
    In light of tenet #1, how are good and evil complements, and one not being superior than the other?  The knowledge of calling an action good (yang), evil (yin) is created.  Is not good superior to evil?  Is not light superior to darkness and darkness flees from the light.
     
    The complement of rest (yin) versus action (yang) reminds me of the words of King Benjamin,
     
    “And see that all these things are done in wisdom and order; for it is not requisite that man should run faster than he has strength [yin]. And again, it is expedient that he should be diligent [yang].”
     
    An excess of “rest” would lead to slothfulness (harming spirit), while an excess of “diligence” can harm the body.
  19. Like
    Anddenex reacted to spamlds in Ying and Yang   
    I always understood Yin and Yang as simply a symbol of duality--what we think of as "opposition in all things." Agency and perception depend on duality. If we don't have the contrast, choices don't exist. The two abide together in one. Without agency and opposition, there is no existence.
  20. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Crypto in Ying and Yang   
    I agree in part.( please forgive me if i'm reading to far into this)
     
    There is an underlying trend i've been noticing brought up in church on occasion, it's this idea that all things physical, carnal are bad. People hinting that their bodies are gross and disgusting, their appetites are bad etc.
     
    It is the job of the Spiritual to over come the Physical, but that doesn't mean the physical is bad. We got our bodies because they are good. Yes they and physical things can be used improperly, and there are flaws because of the fallen state of the world, but sometimes people need to remember of how physical things are also a blessing, to complement the spirit. 
     
    https://www.lds.org/scriptures/dc-testament/dc/93.33?lang=eng#32
    The body complements the spirit, to receive a fullness of joy.
  21. Like
    Anddenex reacted to The Folk Prophet in Prophetic fallibility/infallibility   
    The whole fallible/infallible thing is a big misdirect. It's meaningless.
     
    Fallible or not -- I choose to follow. The fallibility is irrelevant. Entirely meaningless.
  22. Like
    Anddenex reacted to spamlds in Prophetic fallibility/infallibility   
    Call me superstitious, but prophets are "big medicine," to put it in Native American parlance. God stands by them in remarkable ways. Miriam, Moses' sister got stricken with leprosy for criticizing him. Dathan, Korah, and Abiram got swallowed up in the earth for challenging Moses' authority. A bunch of children mocked Elijah and 23 of them were eaten by a she bear. Ananias and Saphira lied to Peter about their donations and were struck dead. Korihor defied Alma and was struck dumb. Jacob Haun disregarded Joseph's warning to move the saint at Haun's Mill and a bunch of saints died. I want to honor God's messengers and stick as close to their teachings as I can get. That's the safest path through this life.
  23. Like
    Anddenex reacted to mordorbund in Prophetic fallibility/infallibility   
    I think Traveller's suzerain illustration describes it well. The prophet is the Lord's representative. He is accountable to God for what he teaches. If a person embarks on a differing path, then that person bears the full burden of that choice as though a revelation came direct (which is great if God really excuses you from serving a mission or wants you to go into debt for this really important thing; not so great if the blanket rule applies to you too).
  24. Like
    Anddenex reacted to Vort in Prophetic fallibility/infallibility   
    My observation is that those who decry the supposed practice of "prophetic infallibility" almost always want to deny or talk their way out of something important and meaningful. I have recently seen this canard hoisted in talking about homosexual "marriage" and women being "ordained" to the Priesthood.
     
    The whining about those silly old Mormons worshiping their prophets is almost always agenda-driven. When I hear such complaints, my guard immediately goes up even before I hear what they're whining about. It's a rare event, not one time in ten, when the thing the complainers are really complaining about has any merit at all.
  25. Like
    Anddenex reacted to spamlds in Prophetic fallibility/infallibility   
    I was talking to my wife about this topic. Anti-Mormons try to set up a false dichotomy. Would we follow the Prophet or would we follow the Bible? My sweetheart always has a way of succinctly getting to the point. She said, "Would you obey Noah and get on the ark or would you argue with him because God didn't say anything to you?" That's a good way to approach it. Modern sectarians would stand there with previously given scripture in hand and argue with Noah, telling him that they couldn't find anything about building an ark or a flood before it came. Indeed, if they followed today's pattern, they would try to stop the ark's construction via the zoning board saying that it was too tall, had inadequate parking, disrupted traffic, and harmed the residential character of the neighborhood.