askandanswer

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  1. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Backroads in Mental Health and Worthiness   
    My son, while on his mission, was assigned to a companion who had gone home because of depression, but who then came back to the mission field. The Mission President knew that my son and this other elder had been in MTC together and were good friends, so when the depressed elder returned to the mission field, the President made them companions in the hope that being with my son could help him overcome the depression. Unfortunately, that did not succeed. They were together for about three months and my son said that it was the most unproductive time of his mission. Because of his depression my son's companion showed little interest in members or investigators and made little attempt to interact with them. Eventually his companion was medically released before he was due to finish his mission.
     
    We had a lovely young sister in our ward about a year ago who put in her mission papers and after waiting for mroe than three months, she finally received a reply that basically said not yet, wait a while and try again later. I believe she had some sort of anxiety issues, but it was hardly noticeable. She waited about 6 months and sent in her papers again. She is now about 6 months into an enjoyable and successful mission. 
     
    I know of another person, many years ago, when we were in a different ward, who spent some time in an institution with schizoprenia during his mid teens. In his early 20's he applied to serve a mission but was knocked back. Instead, he was called on a building mission. Sometime after that, he applied again and was again knocked back, but was called to serve a three month mini-mission during which he baptised more people than many of the full time missionaries. Eventually, after putting in his mission application a third time, he was finally called to a full time mission. He completed a successful full time mission, baptised several people, and was honourably released. 
     
    I know that responses to applications to serve a mission are inspired and reflect the Lord's will for each applicant. You can be confident that whatever happens in relation to your brother's friend will be the Lords will for her. 
  2. Like
    askandanswer reacted to omegaseamaster75 in Mental Health and Worthiness   
    4.5.3

    Physical, Mental, and Emotional Challenges

    Missionary work is demanding. Members who have physical, mental, or emotional challenges that would prevent them from serving effectively are not called to missionary service. Experience indicates that those who, for example, suffer from serious emotional instability, are severely impaired visually, require a wheelchair or crutches, or are dependent on others to perform normal daily tasks should not be recommended for missionary service.

    Missionary candidates who have previously had significant emotional challenges must be stabilized and confirmed to be fully functional before being recommended. A candidate who is dependent on medication for emotional stability must have demonstrated that he or she can fully function in the demanding environment of a mission with the medication before being recommended. The candidate must also commit to continue taking the medications unless otherwise authorized by a professional health care provider. The bishop includes in the recommendation forms a list of medications the person is taking.

    Young missionaries who are significantly overweight experience difficulties dealing with the rigorous physical demands of a mission. These difficulties also affect their companions. Bishops and stake presidents should be sensitive and wise in considering whether individuals should be recommended for missions when their weight will adversely affect their service. If prospective missionaries are significantly overweight, local leaders should counsel with them about reducing their weight before the missionary recommendation forms are submitted. For weight guidelines, the bishop or stake president may contact the Missionary Department or the assigned administrative office.

    If the bishop and stake president are unsure about recommending a member who has any of these challenges, they may consult with the Missionary Department (1-801-240-2179 or 1-800-453-3860, extension 2-2179). They should not recommend exceptions that are unwarranted or that they do not endorse without reservation.

    If a member who has serious challenges strongly desires to serve a mission but does not qualify, the bishop and stake president express love and gratitude for the member’s willingness to serve and explain that because of the circumstances, the member is honorably excused from missionary service for his or her own benefit and to avoid placing undue demands on mission leaders and companions.

    These members should be encouraged to pursue such important endeavors as education, career development, temple preparation, and temple marriage. For those who have a strong desire to serve, the bishop may counsel with the stake president to identify local opportunities for Church or community service. See 4.12 for information about Church-service missionaries.

     4.5.4

    Medical Limitations

    A prospective missionary who has a serious medical limitation, including any due to injury or illness, can be considered only with the recommendation of a competent medical authority. Before submitting the recommendation forms, the stake president should consult with the Missionary Department (1-801-240-2179 or 1-800-453-3860, extension 2-2179).

     4.5.5

    Review by the Area Medical Adviser

    Outside the United States and Canada, missionary recommendation forms are submitted through the Area Presidency. Under their direction, the area medical adviser reviews all recommendation forms and identifies any unresolved medical and dental conditions or immunization issues that could affect the candidate’s ability to serve or the nature of the assignment.

    If the area medical adviser feels that treatment is needed before a person is able to serve, he reviews the situation with the Area Presidency. They may return the missionary recommendation forms to the stake president, who ensures that the necessary treatment is arranged for. When the medical condition is resolved, the stake president may resubmit the forms.

  3. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Mental Health and Worthiness   
    My son, while on his mission, was assigned to a companion who had gone home because of depression, but who then came back to the mission field. The Mission President knew that my son and this other elder had been in MTC together and were good friends, so when the depressed elder returned to the mission field, the President made them companions in the hope that being with my son could help him overcome the depression. Unfortunately, that did not succeed. They were together for about three months and my son said that it was the most unproductive time of his mission. Because of his depression my son's companion showed little interest in members or investigators and made little attempt to interact with them. Eventually his companion was medically released before he was due to finish his mission.
     
    We had a lovely young sister in our ward about a year ago who put in her mission papers and after waiting for mroe than three months, she finally received a reply that basically said not yet, wait a while and try again later. I believe she had some sort of anxiety issues, but it was hardly noticeable. She waited about 6 months and sent in her papers again. She is now about 6 months into an enjoyable and successful mission. 
     
    I know of another person, many years ago, when we were in a different ward, who spent some time in an institution with schizoprenia during his mid teens. In his early 20's he applied to serve a mission but was knocked back. Instead, he was called on a building mission. Sometime after that, he applied again and was again knocked back, but was called to serve a three month mini-mission during which he baptised more people than many of the full time missionaries. Eventually, after putting in his mission application a third time, he was finally called to a full time mission. He completed a successful full time mission, baptised several people, and was honourably released. 
     
    I know that responses to applications to serve a mission are inspired and reflect the Lord's will for each applicant. You can be confident that whatever happens in relation to your brother's friend will be the Lords will for her. 
  4. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Daybreak79 in Do you have to believe 100% that the BoM is true to be baptized?   
    Its a mission problem, not a ward problem, so I think the best person to resolve it would be the Mission President, and not the bishop or ward mission leader. I think the missionary is in error and I suspect the President would be somewhat concerned about this. I believe if the investigator was to contact the Mission President directly and explain the situation, that the President would quickly and correctly resolve the issue and then use it as a teaching opportunity for the missionary, and maybe for the whole mission, thereby benefitting the investigator, the missionary and the mission. I think it would be a little awkward for you to make the approach to the Mission President, but with some coaching and advice, I'm sure you could adequately prepare your friend to make the approach. I'd be interested in knowing how things turn out. I hope your friend is not put off by this experience. 
     
    I note that every now and then a speaker in General Conference will say something along the lines of "every time I read the scriptures, I learn something new," thereby suggesting that although they believe 100%, even they don't understand 100%. 
  5. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from hagoth in Mental Health and Worthiness   
    My son, while on his mission, was assigned to a companion who had gone home because of depression, but who then came back to the mission field. The Mission President knew that my son and this other elder had been in MTC together and were good friends, so when the depressed elder returned to the mission field, the President made them companions in the hope that being with my son could help him overcome the depression. Unfortunately, that did not succeed. They were together for about three months and my son said that it was the most unproductive time of his mission. Because of his depression my son's companion showed little interest in members or investigators and made little attempt to interact with them. Eventually his companion was medically released before he was due to finish his mission.
     
    We had a lovely young sister in our ward about a year ago who put in her mission papers and after waiting for mroe than three months, she finally received a reply that basically said not yet, wait a while and try again later. I believe she had some sort of anxiety issues, but it was hardly noticeable. She waited about 6 months and sent in her papers again. She is now about 6 months into an enjoyable and successful mission. 
     
    I know of another person, many years ago, when we were in a different ward, who spent some time in an institution with schizoprenia during his mid teens. In his early 20's he applied to serve a mission but was knocked back. Instead, he was called on a building mission. Sometime after that, he applied again and was again knocked back, but was called to serve a three month mini-mission during which he baptised more people than many of the full time missionaries. Eventually, after putting in his mission application a third time, he was finally called to a full time mission. He completed a successful full time mission, baptised several people, and was honourably released. 
     
    I know that responses to applications to serve a mission are inspired and reflect the Lord's will for each applicant. You can be confident that whatever happens in relation to your brother's friend will be the Lords will for her. 
  6. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from hagoth in Do you have to believe 100% that the BoM is true to be baptized?   
    Its a mission problem, not a ward problem, so I think the best person to resolve it would be the Mission President, and not the bishop or ward mission leader. I think the missionary is in error and I suspect the President would be somewhat concerned about this. I believe if the investigator was to contact the Mission President directly and explain the situation, that the President would quickly and correctly resolve the issue and then use it as a teaching opportunity for the missionary, and maybe for the whole mission, thereby benefitting the investigator, the missionary and the mission. I think it would be a little awkward for you to make the approach to the Mission President, but with some coaching and advice, I'm sure you could adequately prepare your friend to make the approach. I'd be interested in knowing how things turn out. I hope your friend is not put off by this experience. 
     
    I note that every now and then a speaker in General Conference will say something along the lines of "every time I read the scriptures, I learn something new," thereby suggesting that although they believe 100%, even they don't understand 100%. 
  7. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Mental Health and Worthiness   
    My son, while on his mission, was assigned to a companion who had gone home because of depression, but who then came back to the mission field. The Mission President knew that my son and this other elder had been in MTC together and were good friends, so when the depressed elder returned to the mission field, the President made them companions in the hope that being with my son could help him overcome the depression. Unfortunately, that did not succeed. They were together for about three months and my son said that it was the most unproductive time of his mission. Because of his depression my son's companion showed little interest in members or investigators and made little attempt to interact with them. Eventually his companion was medically released before he was due to finish his mission.
     
    We had a lovely young sister in our ward about a year ago who put in her mission papers and after waiting for mroe than three months, she finally received a reply that basically said not yet, wait a while and try again later. I believe she had some sort of anxiety issues, but it was hardly noticeable. She waited about 6 months and sent in her papers again. She is now about 6 months into an enjoyable and successful mission. 
     
    I know of another person, many years ago, when we were in a different ward, who spent some time in an institution with schizoprenia during his mid teens. In his early 20's he applied to serve a mission but was knocked back. Instead, he was called on a building mission. Sometime after that, he applied again and was again knocked back, but was called to serve a three month mini-mission during which he baptised more people than many of the full time missionaries. Eventually, after putting in his mission application a third time, he was finally called to a full time mission. He completed a successful full time mission, baptised several people, and was honourably released. 
     
    I know that responses to applications to serve a mission are inspired and reflect the Lord's will for each applicant. You can be confident that whatever happens in relation to your brother's friend will be the Lords will for her. 
  8. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Sunday21 in Ways people start their talks in Sacrament meeting   
    Most people here start with the story of how they were assigned the talk and how they went about first putting off preparing the talk and later how they actually prepared it. I think those kind of stories can use up 2 - 5 minutes of time that could be better spent speaking on the assigned topic. I like it when talks start with a joke or funny anecdote, particularly if its related to the topic, and when that happens, I am likely to listen to the talk that follows more carefully. 
  9. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Crypto in Ways people start their talks in Sacrament meeting   
    This approach reminds of the story of the old time preacher that I'm sure many of us have heard. His approach when preparing a sermon was 
    first I tell em what I'm gonna say
    then I tell em
    Then I tell em what I just told em
  10. Like
    askandanswer reacted to estradling75 in cell phones and white stones   
    Well if you want to continue cell phone/white stone idea... Then anyone that has tried to view their cell phone in bright sunlight can sympathize with Joseph putting his seer stone in an hat to block out light while translating the Book of Mormon.
  11. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from skalenfehl in cell phones and white stones   
    Thanks Skalenfehl, that's quite a well written essay. I'll keep it in mind if I ever have to give a talk or lesson on how we use our time.
  12. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Vort in Ways people start their talks in Sacrament meeting   
    Most people here start with the story of how they were assigned the talk and how they went about first putting off preparing the talk and later how they actually prepared it. I think those kind of stories can use up 2 - 5 minutes of time that could be better spent speaking on the assigned topic. I like it when talks start with a joke or funny anecdote, particularly if its related to the topic, and when that happens, I am likely to listen to the talk that follows more carefully. 
  13. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Latter Days Guy in Compromise - for askandanswer   
    The question that led to Tess's response was a request for Tess to elaborate on her understanding of the difference between compromise and bending as Tess stated in one of her posts on the thread about attending a gay marriage that one should not have to bend to show love. I think her response in this thread provides an answer to that question which might be suitable for only a fairly narrow range of circumstances where bending, or compromising might be desirable. In the example of the burnt toast, the husband compromises his principle of honesty in order to relieve any concern his wife might have about the fact that she has burnt the toast and I can see in that example how the same effect  - relieving any concern - could be achieved without the husband compromising his principle of honesty, and I can see how that approach might work. However, as I said, this illustrates only quite a small sub-set of circumstances in which it might not be necessary to compromise and I believe that bending by both partners is an important component of a successful marriage. For example:
     
    My wife and I have significantly different beliefs about the relative importance of form and function. I believe that the function of my car is entirely unaffected by how dirty it is or how much rubbish there is in the back seat but she strongly dislikes travelling in a dirty car. We compromise so the car gets washed more often than is needed to maintain satisfactory performance, and less often than she would like.
     
    My philosophy of gardening is, with few exceptions, that if something is green and growing, you leave it alone and let it do its thing. My wife's approach is that everything must be in neat, straight, orderly rows and that small well trimmed bushes are greatly preferable to large disorderly trees. So we accommodate each other. In the garden, there are my areas and her areas. We haven't bent but we have learned to accept difference and respect each other's view.
     
    We have different approaches to parenting. I much prefer free range parenting where I set few, but firm standards, and then give the kids considerable autonomy. She likes to know where they are, who they are with, what they are doing, and when and how they will get home, and any changes to any of the above. The kids prefer to minimise the amount of information they are willing to give us. We have all reached a compromise whereby the amount of information we want and get from the kids depends on a bunch of variables such as the time and importance of the activity, who else will be there, and whether its a school, social or church activity.Its sometimes more information than I think we need, less information than my wife would like, and more information than what the kids want to give.
     
    I think when a partner sees that we are willing to, or actually do, give up/compromise/bend/modify a belief, value, principle or standard, for their sake, that they are likely to appreciate and value that, and maybe even see it as one of the many ways in which we can show love for them, and depending on which principle is being give up, and what it is replaced by, this can be a good thing. Naturally, care should be taken when trying to find the right balance between maintaining one's principles and showing love for one's spouse as there are many situations where holding too closely to one can result in losing the other. 
    Ideally, if we have married the right person, the principles or values that we give up or modify are replaced by higher principles that our spouse is already living.  
     
    When reflecting on the example of the burnt toast, I have come to the slightly alarming realisation that my own, somewhat churlish response would be to eat all of the toast without comment, good or bad, but to probably not give any appreciation for it, even though my wife has gone out of her way to do something nice for me. That is something that I will need to change.
     
    Thank you Tess for taking the time to prepare a well considered reply to my query.
  14. Like
    askandanswer reacted to mordorbund in New movie "Meet the Mormons" coming out   
    Rated PG? Must be saturated with caffeine and "fetch"
  15. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Maureen in Compromise - for askandanswer   
    The question that led to Tess's response was a request for Tess to elaborate on her understanding of the difference between compromise and bending as Tess stated in one of her posts on the thread about attending a gay marriage that one should not have to bend to show love. I think her response in this thread provides an answer to that question which might be suitable for only a fairly narrow range of circumstances where bending, or compromising might be desirable. In the example of the burnt toast, the husband compromises his principle of honesty in order to relieve any concern his wife might have about the fact that she has burnt the toast and I can see in that example how the same effect  - relieving any concern - could be achieved without the husband compromising his principle of honesty, and I can see how that approach might work. However, as I said, this illustrates only quite a small sub-set of circumstances in which it might not be necessary to compromise and I believe that bending by both partners is an important component of a successful marriage. For example:
     
    My wife and I have significantly different beliefs about the relative importance of form and function. I believe that the function of my car is entirely unaffected by how dirty it is or how much rubbish there is in the back seat but she strongly dislikes travelling in a dirty car. We compromise so the car gets washed more often than is needed to maintain satisfactory performance, and less often than she would like.
     
    My philosophy of gardening is, with few exceptions, that if something is green and growing, you leave it alone and let it do its thing. My wife's approach is that everything must be in neat, straight, orderly rows and that small well trimmed bushes are greatly preferable to large disorderly trees. So we accommodate each other. In the garden, there are my areas and her areas. We haven't bent but we have learned to accept difference and respect each other's view.
     
    We have different approaches to parenting. I much prefer free range parenting where I set few, but firm standards, and then give the kids considerable autonomy. She likes to know where they are, who they are with, what they are doing, and when and how they will get home, and any changes to any of the above. The kids prefer to minimise the amount of information they are willing to give us. We have all reached a compromise whereby the amount of information we want and get from the kids depends on a bunch of variables such as the time and importance of the activity, who else will be there, and whether its a school, social or church activity.Its sometimes more information than I think we need, less information than my wife would like, and more information than what the kids want to give.
     
    I think when a partner sees that we are willing to, or actually do, give up/compromise/bend/modify a belief, value, principle or standard, for their sake, that they are likely to appreciate and value that, and maybe even see it as one of the many ways in which we can show love for them, and depending on which principle is being give up, and what it is replaced by, this can be a good thing. Naturally, care should be taken when trying to find the right balance between maintaining one's principles and showing love for one's spouse as there are many situations where holding too closely to one can result in losing the other. 
    Ideally, if we have married the right person, the principles or values that we give up or modify are replaced by higher principles that our spouse is already living.  
     
    When reflecting on the example of the burnt toast, I have come to the slightly alarming realisation that my own, somewhat churlish response would be to eat all of the toast without comment, good or bad, but to probably not give any appreciation for it, even though my wife has gone out of her way to do something nice for me. That is something that I will need to change.
     
    Thank you Tess for taking the time to prepare a well considered reply to my query.
  16. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from PolarVortex in Attending a Gay Wedding   
    I think the only reliable conclusion that can be made about a person attending a gay wedding is that they are attending a gay wedding. I don’t think their attendance is sufficient evidence to draw a conclusion that they are supporting, condoning or endorsing the event. It’s possible that that’s the reason why they are there but there are a hundred other possibilities as well. Unless the attendee has directly told us why they are there, we shouldn’t try to make any guesses as to their views on gay marriage simply because of their attendance at a gay wedding. I would hope that people would form their opinions, or make their judgements, on more substantial evidence than that. 
  17. Like
    askandanswer reacted to estradling75 in Attending a Gay Wedding   
    Lets run this analogy...  
     
    Lets say your child lies dying in the hospital due to an attempt at suicide.  Would you consider showing up at their bedside a a sign of support for their actions and choices that lead to their suicide?  Or would you be there because in spite of all their poor choices because when it comes right down to it this is a time you need to be there.  Both for yourself and for them?
  18. Like
    askandanswer reacted to pkstpaul in Attending a Gay Wedding   
    If would be disheartening if the Church DID make a statement on this. We are taught principles to live by not what side of the bed to get out of each day.
  19. Like
    askandanswer reacted to NightSG in Attending a Gay Wedding   
    We don't?
     
    Anybody know a good cosmetic surgeon?
  20. Like
    askandanswer reacted to NeuroTypical in To Latter Days Guy   
    Groupug.
     

  21. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from mordorbund in Left Socks and Right Socks   
    Both left and right socks have a hole - its generally at the top of the sock and it's how you get your foot into the sock.
     
    if its too much of a problem, maybe just remove the feet, then no more socks are needed.
  22. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Backroads in Early riser   
    Its easy when you work from your laptop even if it is al l l  l l  the way out in the kitchen
  23. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Honor in LDS.net Annual General Conference get-together   
    This would be a little more realistic of Pam in that dress...

  24. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Honor in LDS.net Annual General Conference get-together   
    I resent the assumption that I look THAT much like a dude!
     
    I'd at LEAST shave for the occasion!
  25. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Blackmarch in A-Z things u do NOT want under your bed   
    So Vort wouldn’t want his father-in-law, lava or ninjas under his bed, funky town doesn’t like dirty diapers, assassins, snakes, foul filth or ferrets, Bini wouldn’t want the undead, Angel Marvel is opposed to vampires and kinky people, Jimmi wouldn’t plutonium under his bed, mirkwood doesn’t want rotten bodies or demons, and for some strange reason, paleride is opposed to possums and hobbits.
     
    Come on, what is it with you people? I've never encountered such blatant discrimination! Learn a little tolerance and acceptance and be open to new friends and experiences. Y’all should try to follow Isaiah’s teachings 
     
    The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together;