askandanswer

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  1. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Phineas in Bruce R. McConkie’s Legacy.   
    Just a short anecdote that I heard about Elder McConkie a few hours ago during the Saturday night session of stake conference - it doesnt contribute anything to the question being discussed here but I think its worth sharing. This was shared by a counsellor in the Mission Presidency, recalling an incidence when he was 12 years old attending a stake conference at which Elder McConkie was presiding.
    Elder McConkie gets up and says he has a message that the prophet has charged him to deliver to the saints in this city. But while waiting for his turn to talk, he says he felt the spirit prompting him to talk about something completely different. So what to do, he asks the congregation, follow the prophet or follow the spirit? He explains that he will follow the spirit and then report to the Prophet what he has done when he gets back to Salt Lake. 
    Later in tonight's conference, the visiting Area Seventy decided to elaborate on that theme by spending several minutes discussing Doctrine and Covenants 46:2
    2 But notwithstanding those things which are written, it always has been given to the aelders of my church from the beginning, and ever shall be, to bconduct all meetings as they are directed and guided by the Holy Spirit.
    The Area Seventy went on to carefully explain that the promptings of the Spirit trump whatever it might say in the written material that the church relies on, specifically the scriptures and the Handbook.    
  2. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Vort in Why Do Bad Things Happen To Good People?   
    The next time this question comes my why, if my memory is working, I will be tempted to commence my reply by saying something like, "so what you're asking is why do things that I think are bad happen to people that I think are good?" 
  3. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Anddenex in Is it easy or hard.   
    Short answer - it varies. Nothing always stays the same, so sometimes it is easy and sometimes it is hard. And sometimes what is hard for one person will be easy for another and vice-versa. And sometimes, for the same person, what was once easy can become hard, and vice-versa. 
  4. Like
    askandanswer reacted to CV75 in Why Do Bad Things Happen To Good People?   
    Why do bad things happen to good people? I think it's a matter of perspective, and what one chooses to call good and bad.
  5. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Anddenex in Is it easy or hard.   
    Short answer - it varies. Nothing always stays the same, so sometimes it is easy and sometimes it is hard. And sometimes what is hard for one person will be easy for another and vice-versa. And sometimes, for the same person, what was once easy can become hard, and vice-versa. 
  6. Thanks
    askandanswer reacted to mordorbund in Doctrine and Covenants 21: 8   
    I think Joseph wept for Zion when they were cast out of Missouri. But I don't think the Zion in this verse is the same Zion as later in the revelations.
    For a year Joseph's revelations encouraged believers to establish Zion and establish the cause of Zion (see D&C 6, 11, 12, and 14). This was before the revelation on the gathering to Zion; it was before the inspired translation of Genesis that would describe Enoch's Zion.
    So what is this cause of Zion Joseph was occupied with, that kept showing up in his revelations? And would this phrase have any meaning to his contemporaries?
  7. Haha
    askandanswer reacted to Traveler in Lorax Political?   
    This reminds me of a post card I saw eons ago in my youth.  There is a picture with a young couple sitting romantically under a tree having a picnic.   The young fellow trying to impress the lady asks if she likes Kipling.  She responds with:  "I do not know.  I've never kipled."
     
    The Traveler
  8. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Anddenex in Asking for trials?   
    I'm happy to leave the nature of the trial up to God, knowing that He knows what I need better than I do and feeling confident in His abilty to design and deliver a trial that will help me meet those needs if I handle the trial well.
    I'm not sure how knowing what the nature of the trial will be impacts on its utility.
  9. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Jamie123 in Asking for trials?   
    Remember also the Lord's prayer: "Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil". Not "lead us into temptation so we can have the glory of resisting it".
  10. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Traveler in Asking for trials?   
    I am of a rather different mind, if you do not mind my explanation.  I have become rather keen on the eternal principle of agency and divine covenants.  In short I speculate that in the pre-existence that nothing was planned by G-d without our knowledge and full complicity.   Part of our agency and divine covenants included a vale of forgetfulness during our mortal experience and as such; I have concluded that nothing in this life can or will happen to which we were ignorant of while all things were planned with our full approval in the pre-existence.
    I am of the mind that there is no reason to "blame" G-d for anything concerning this life but rather we need to recognize and have faith - not only in the wisdom of G-d but the principle of liberty and freedom to which we are appointed as his covenant children.  I believe we are and will be what we have determined by our agency and endless time to be what we currently are and to become - and that we ought to respect that right of covenant to all of G-d's children - especially those that we personally encounter during our mortal experience to follow whatever path or journey they have determined - including those choices that seem of lessor eternal importance or value to ourselves.
     
    The Traveler
  11. Love
    askandanswer reacted to Vort in Asking for trials?   
    Nine years ago, President Eyring offered this thought:
    I heard President Spencer W. Kimball, in a session of conference, ask that God would give him mountains to climb. He said: “There are great challenges ahead of us, giant opportunities to be met. I welcome that exciting prospect and feel to say to the Lord, humbly, ‘Give me this mountain,’ give me these challenges.”1
    My heart was stirred, knowing, as I did, some of the challenges and adversity he had already faced. I felt a desire to be more like him, a valiant servant of God. So one night I prayed for a test to prove my courage. I can remember it vividly. In the evening I knelt in my bedroom with a faith that seemed almost to fill my heart to bursting.
    Within a day or two my prayer was answered. The hardest trial of my life [up to that time] surprised and humbled me. It provided me a twofold lesson. First, I had clear proof that God heard and answered my prayer of faith. But second, I began a tutorial that still goes on to learn about why I felt with such confidence that night that a great blessing could come from adversity to more than compensate for any cost.
    In our most recent General Conference, President Eyring offered this:
    Now, even with such blessings promised through tribulation, we do not seek tribulation. In the mortal experience, we will have ample opportunity to prove ourselves, to pass tests hard enough to become ever more like the Savior and our Heavenly Father.
    President Eyring often speaks of enduring trials well. In the above examples, perhaps his opinion changed in the span of time between his younger self and his present state. In any case, I agree with the elder Elder Eyring. Tribulations will come. We do not need to seek them out. For myself, I try to avoid tribulation, even praying at times to avoid such, knowing full well that a loving Father will bless me with trials as he sees fit.
    I don't need to pray for trials. As Manzoni put into the mouth of Lucia in The Betrothed, "I did not go looking for trouble; it's trouble that came for me." Actually, the whole passage is worth reading. (The whole book, if you have taste for early 19th century classic Italian literature.)
    "I have learned," [Renzo] said, "not to get involved in riots; I have learned not to preach in the square; I have learned to watch whom I speak with; I've learned not to drink too much; I've learned not to lift the doorknocker when there are people inside with hot heads; I've learned not to kick a doorbell before thinking what could happen;  and a hundred other things."
    But Lucia, although she did not find this doctrine wrong in itself, was not satisfied; it seemed to her, although confusedly, as if something were missing. After hearing the same song repeated, and wondering every time-- "And I?" -- she said one day to her moralist, "What do you think we have learned? I did not go looking for trouble; it's trouble that came for me. Unless I mean," she added, smiling softly, "that my mistake was to love you, and promise myself to you."
    After a long debate and thinking it over together, they concluded that troubles come rather often, because there are causes for them; but that the most careful and innocent behavior was not enough to keep them far away; and that when they come, with or without fault, the faith in God makes them easier to bear, and makes them useful for a better life. This conclusion, although found by poor people, seems so fair that we have decided to put it here, as the juice of the the entire story.
  12. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeedleinA in Charity: Feeling jaded on charity   
    I think the person who calls, if they are asking for help for something they could do themselves, may indeed be doing themselves some harm. I also think that the person who answers the call, if they do so with a cheerful and willing heart - because God loves a cheerful giver - will be blessed for what they do, regardless of the needs or motivations of the caller.
    6  But this I say, He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.
    7  Every man according as he purposeth in his heart, so let him give; not grudgingly, or of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful giver.
    8  And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work:
    (New Testament | 2 Corinthians 9:6 - 😎
    I think it would make for a fascinating study to try to guesstimate the primary considerations that God takes into account when trying to decide how to respond to a plea for help. Sometimes He parts the sea, sometimes He makes the waters stand up in a heap, sometimes the rivers of water are turned out of their course, and sometimes He just tells you where to find ore to make tools to build a ship. I think there are probably reasons for the different responses to what is essentially the same problem of how to get across a body of water. I think that God is well able to make such judgements as to what is needed and how best to respond to a request for help, but my judgement skills are not as good as His. 
    As to the idea of whether helping such a person is the best use of our time and energy, I haven't yet reached the point in life where all of my decisions and actions are determined by what I think is the best way to use my time although I acknowledge that that is a worthy goal to aim for. Too often my actions and decisions are based on what  I want rather than what I think is best. 
     
  13. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Backroads in Charity: Feeling jaded on charity   
    It seems to me that what you are feeling is more manly rather than Godly. Such feelings are both natural, and necessary to change. I think that the best way to change your feelings from natural to Godly is by having an increased love for those you serve. If you cannot feel an increased love for these people then you can start one step further back and pray for a desire to love those you serve. As you pray with sincerity, humility, faith and real desire, God is likely to grant you the righteous desires of your heart and you will begin to feel a desire to love these people. As you consistently and gratefully act on that desire, you will come to love them and your sour feelings will be transformed. It all starts with you having the faith and the desire and humbly taking the problem to the Lord in prayer.
  14. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeedleinA in Charity: Feeling jaded on charity   
    I think the person who calls, if they are asking for help for something they could do themselves, may indeed be doing themselves some harm. I also think that the person who answers the call, if they do so with a cheerful and willing heart - because God loves a cheerful giver - will be blessed for what they do, regardless of the needs or motivations of the caller.
    6  But this I say, He which soweth sparingly shall reap also sparingly; and he which soweth bountifully shall reap also bountifully.
    7  Every man according as he purposeth in his heart, so let him give; not grudgingly, or of necessity: for God loveth a cheerful giver.
    8  And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work:
    (New Testament | 2 Corinthians 9:6 - 😎
    I think it would make for a fascinating study to try to guesstimate the primary considerations that God takes into account when trying to decide how to respond to a plea for help. Sometimes He parts the sea, sometimes He makes the waters stand up in a heap, sometimes the rivers of water are turned out of their course, and sometimes He just tells you where to find ore to make tools to build a ship. I think there are probably reasons for the different responses to what is essentially the same problem of how to get across a body of water. I think that God is well able to make such judgements as to what is needed and how best to respond to a request for help, but my judgement skills are not as good as His. 
    As to the idea of whether helping such a person is the best use of our time and energy, I haven't yet reached the point in life where all of my decisions and actions are determined by what I think is the best way to use my time although I acknowledge that that is a worthy goal to aim for. Too often my actions and decisions are based on what  I want rather than what I think is best. 
     
  15. Like
    askandanswer reacted to mordorbund in Charity: Feeling jaded on charity   
    As mentioned earlier in this thread, God is a tremendous enabler. Instead of striking idiots with blight He causes His rain to fall on both the just and the unjust. One of the themes that comes out in the apocryphal accounts of the Flood (and even in our own book of Moses) is that God's generosity to the wicked is an absolute mystery. Enoch, the angels, and later Zenos' gardener all wonder why God puts up with this garbage as long as He does!
    I sometimes wonder if this is the wisdom of coming to a telestial creation. The Spirit knows all things, but godliness - perhaps even charity - requires that we learn through our own experience how to love those who don't deserve it.
    That said, I also acknowledge that Jesus did not move away the stone of Lazarus' tomb, and had to be talked down from destroying the Israelites and creating a new nation from Moses' descendants. There's a balance here, and I'm not sure that I know where to draw the line between allowing enabling versus allowing divine discontent.
    President Oaks has drawn attention to these two forms of divine love and says there's a need for both. But as a general authority he leaves it at general principles and leaves to us to work out what requests we file in each group. https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/general-conference/2009/10/love-and-law?lang=eng
  16. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Carborendum in Snow!Snow!Snow!   
    So, it appears to be fixed.  I had to call my BIL for advice on how to remove a sharkbite connector that didn't seal properly.  Apparently a properly sized crescent wrench will do the job.
    I spent about 30 minutes shoving as much rector seal into that joint as possible.  So far, so good.  I'm concerned that the rector seal is only a temporary solution.  So, I will need to get real parts when they become available.
    The carpet is still drying from the burst pipe.  I got the fan and the dehumidifier right next to the wet area.  Slowly but surely.
    Everything seems almost normal.  Laundry machines, dishwasher, showers.
    Oh! blessed showers! Wow that felt so good.  I just felt so grimy from head to toe with all the physical labor I had to do this week.  Cutting and splitting oak is not an easy feat, especially for a guy my size.
    Luckily, my ministering brother is quite a bit on the large side.  "Brawny" is a perfect adjective.  He brought over a truckbed (About a 1/4 chord) of oak and we spent some time taking turns with the axe, and the sledge/wedge combo.
    I'll tell you what.  I'm very happy I invested in that all steel 14 lb maul.  We hit the wedge with the handle about as often as we it it with the head.
    Adjusting for our relative sizes, I think I carried my share of the load.
    One really cool fun fact: If you spend about 10-20 min. with a 14 lb maul, an axe seems like a toothpick afterwards.
    After all is said and done my wife really saved our lives this week.  She keeps downplaying her role.  But I analyzed all the basic necessities and how we managed to have them throughout this week.  She was responsible for every single one of them.  Half of them were things she got a year or more ago.  If it hadn't been for her, I honestly think we would have frozen to death or died of dehydration.
    I keep thanking her.  And she keeps rolling her eyes at me.
  17. Like
    askandanswer reacted to JohnsonJones in Asking evil spirit to depart   
    This is a tougher question to answer...not because it's hard to answer, but it's walking on egg shells.  There's a fine line that's being tread today between validating the Priests and Pastors in other religions who claim to be using the Priesthood and utilizing it's power (and thus, if they are, validating their religions and churches) and the emerging teachings that many are thinking is being taught regarding everyone being able to use the priesthood.
    There is ALSO the danger which is where it appears there is a push to redefine what the definition of the Priesthood is today within the church and how, if accepted as such, ties directly into the direct problem I just stated above. 
    Following down that path ultimately will mean that every Christian church that claims to have and use the priesthood has claim to be the REAL church and the REAL religion, because they have just as much authority and right to use it in the same ways as others without any other external conference of power or authority.
    Hence, the difficulty I have directly answering the question easily.
    That said, the question you ask can be seen as too broad a question to directly answer in light of the above.  The Priesthood itself is seen as the Power of the Lord, however the authority of the Priesthood is related to offices and keys of which the ordinances of the Gospel are given.  A simple answer are that ALL miracles that come from God are the manifestation of the Priesthood in our lives regardless of whom it comes through.  However, there are certain blessings and ordinances that come solely through those upon whom the power and authority has been conferred upon and upon whom the keys have been ordained to.
  18. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Carborendum in Snow!Snow!Snow!   
    And power outages.
    I thought I'd drop a line to let know we survived.
    Texans don't know how to drive in cold conditions.  So there was a 13 car pile up last Friday at a bridge I was planning on using to get to work.  But I couldn't get out of the subdivision for all the traffic being re-routed.  I later heard of a 100 car pile up in Dallas because of bridges.
    We woke up around 5:00 am Monday morning to a home without power.  (Someone later told me that it was out at 4:30.) I immediately checked the news form my phone since our router had no power.  I found that the Texas commission on electricity decided to do rolling blackouts for periods of 15 to 45 minutes.  It may go as long as one hour, but don't worry, you'll have power again soon.
    The reason is that this was a record storm.  Texans don't have the equipment and supplies to weather such temperatures.  So we depend on technology.  Heaters were taken off of pump mode to emergency heat, which uses a lot more power.  That's a very bad thing if we're in the middle of a blackout. 
    The hours stretched on but we still had no power.  I noticed that cell, text, and data were gone.  Text would work after multiple attempts.  It really was a disaster condition.
    Luckily my wife is a forward thinker.  The had me cutting up our wood pile all weekend long.  She had bought a sterno stove to cook our food.  We shut off the well after filling up our bathtubs with water.  And she had plenty of bottled water for potable use.
    So we got past the worst night, although later this week will be almost as bad.  we were amazed at how much of the house was warmed by the wood stove.
    Our kids played a marathon game of Risk.  Quite the change from the constant electronics in front of their faces.  They even took a break to play with their baby sister by going out to build a snowman (she loves Frozen).
    Work was cancelled yesterday and today.  We'll see about the rest of the week.
    We had power restored in the middle of the night after 20 hours.  I surveyed the damage.
    Our one casualty so far was the well house.  While most of the outdoor piping appears to be intact, there were a couple of valves that were closed that shouldn't have been.  So about a 1' section of pipe broke off between those valves.  Luckily there is a bypass that appears to be intact.  However the two regular valves are damaged.  I don't know if they will spray all over once I turn it back on.  And since the valves are frozen solid, I can't figure everything out until Friday.  I'll probably be spending all day Saturday doing repairs.
    We also have two storage tanks in the shed.  With the 9 degree overnight low and no power, they were frozen solid.  But nothing appears to be broken.
    We have yet to see how much damage there is in the refrigerator and freezer.
    Elsewhere, the ward building and the stake center were both used as shelters for people who didn't properly prepare or were otherwise debilitated by the storm.
    Our ward was being taken care of by the ministering infrastructure.
  19. Like
    askandanswer reacted to NeuroTypical in Charity: Feeling jaded on charity   
    I've been a ward finance clerk for three bishops now.   I've seen endless blessings flow through the fast offerings program.  There are handfuls of stories where a bishop has acted as broker, someone wanted to donate a car, bishop knows someone who needs a car, stuff like that.   It is great to watch the blessings of service reach both sides of the equasion.
    I also have a small handful of experiences where, oh, let's say, people have struggled with behaviors and attitudes that have prevented them from experiencing the full load of blessings.  Or perhaps they're upset at a perceived lack of earned blessings.  Sometimes they get ticked off because the bishop and ward doesn't jump to do them the service they feel they deserve.
    I've seen one example of fraudulent abuse of fast offerings, by a family of professional bilkers who are experts in appearing poor and needy and desperate.  The bishop found them out, and let them know that while the invitation to partake in the church's spiritual blessings was still open to them, they would no longer be able to avail themselves of the temporal ones.  
    @Backroads, don't give up on humanity, just because you've found a place where scammers congregate.  The scriptures seem pretty firm on things, talking about how if you judge the beggar and use that judgment to not help, then you are sinning.  Just keep in mind on what helps people, and what doesn't.  Letting scammers scam, isn't charity and doesn't help.  We're supposed to be more than harmless as doves, we're also supposed to be wise as serpents. And serpents don't buy sob stories from grifters who are lying to get gain.  
    If there's ever any doubt, you can offer to take someone to church, and talk to them about our fast offerings program, and what they need to do to get help from the bishop.  And should they disappear right in front of your eyes and move on to more lucrative pastures, try to genuinely love them enough to be sad for their choice.
     
  20. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from JohnsonJones in Quantum stuff is scary   
    Its a completely different situation in Australia. THe national covid death toll is still below 1,000 and individual cases are regarded as some unusual and important that they are always a major item in the daily news media reports. Despite these very low numbers, all state governments here still take a highly conservative approach to any outbreaks. Last week an outbreak started in our second larget state from an employee in a covid quarantine hotel. WHen it got to 13 cases of community transmission, the state government there locked the state down again for the next 5 days - borders were closed, no going to work except for essential workers, no leaving your house except for shopping, work and exercise and to provide care, no one who is not family coming into your house, no more church, not being allowed to go more than 5 kilometers from your home, compulsory mask wearing in public and fines amounting to slightly less than the average weekly income for not wearing a mask. 
  21. Sad
    askandanswer reacted to JohnsonJones in Quantum stuff is scary   
    I can answer that to a degree.
    You would be surprised at HOW MANY PH.D's are actually quite religious.  I may not be a scientist per se, but I know many of them that have their degrees in science (physics, chemistry, various fields of medicine, etc). 
    In this past year they've done ASTOUNDING things in science, and many of them in their research into a disease which is currently ravaging the world.  Despite their best efforts to try to help people stay safe, to utilize science to find cures, and to do things that to their best knowledge will help alleviate the pandemic going around the world today, they have been met with derision and scorn.
    You would think that these religious men would be welcomed with open arms by the congregations they are part of.  Instead, they have been called all sorts of things, and some of the WORST individuals who are oppressing them???
    Members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Stake and Ward leaders in the LDS corridor, as well as Fundamentalist Evangelicals in the South.  The religions that the professors and researchers are members of, in many locations have completely and totally rejected them and called them many things.
    Items such as saying they are working with a world wide conspiracy to put trackers in everyone with the vaccine.
    Or that they are trying to control everyone by telling them to social distance or to wear masks.
    Or to say that their numbers are flawed and that they are lying to everyone and that the death toll in the US is not as high as they are stating it to be because many do not listen, take precautions, or have made it so political that they don't even CARE about others or try to take precautions that the scientists have been trying to get people to follow.  (to date we have had more die in the US from Covid-19 than the number of people who died in WWII, and the researchers are looking at the numbers and thinking we have undercounted the deaths anywhere from 10% on up...you can hide how many are infected, you can hide what they died from, but you cannot hide excess deaths without other criminal liabilities coming up).
    They blatantly call scientists every name in the books, calling them communists, or even worse, calling into question the scientists own religious beliefs!
    There are those that say that these very scientists that pray daily, sometimes for inspiration while they research, are instead atheists or unbelievers and that these scientists seek to destroy religion and religious practices (and many of my friends are VERY DEVOUT in their religion) is extremely depressing.
    A scientist is not going to reject the things they see as facts, and they are not going to simply toss out their research because religious fanatics tell them too.  Some of the WORST times in history come from ignoring science (Copernicus and Gallileo being silenced, the inquisition, etc), and yet, we see it continuing today.
    It is worse though.  I know of one Medical researcher who is glad he does not have to be on the front lines of the Covid emergency rooms anymore.  He is happy as he has some in his home with high risk conditions.  He is instead doing research and guiding responses.  As he is in a research office, it seems he has not gotten the vaccine.  Most of the people out there have not.  His stake has just informed him that they are going to stop allowing people to do sacrament at home.  They feel the threat is over.  He and I both know two people in that ward (which has continued to meet, but up until now gave members the chance to meet and have the sacrament at home instead of meeting with the rest of the ward) who isolated at home and only went to church who died from Covid-19.  The most likely place they got it was from that ward.  Stake President and Church leaders take no responsibility.  They blatantly ignore science and this fellow, I imagine he is going to be told he has to come to church or not get the sacrament.
    Another who has tried to impress his stake that they should not be having meetings yet...has been told to shut up.  He has been told that he knows nothing and that the Lord will preserve everyone...that anyone who died was at the point that it was their time.  He was aghast at the callousness of it.  They have made him feel as if he is inactive because he is choosing to stay at home.
    I have had a family member who has felt ostracized and tossed out and hence decided that if their stake would act like this, they don't need to attend.
    I am ALSO very religious, though my field is not really science.  I am trying to be strong, but I feel extremely oppressed at this point in my own area.  No one listens to the scientists or medical personnel, or even their own doctors!  Instead, they are forging ahead and ignoring things and some of the actions they are doing are to suppress science and the things said by science and oppress those who are part of the "system" of science as they see it.
    IT is NOT that scientists are rejecting religion.  Many are greatly inspired by it (and many of the scientific items actually originally came from ideas inspired by religion).  It is religion rejecting science.
    I pray daily now that the prophet or someone among the General authorities will save us from the oppression that people like me are under in the church.  I am a full tithe payer, I've stayed loyal to the church and even renewed my temple recommend during the past year.  I have those calling us inactive.  I have those who when they see us try to stand even closer than normal (not even the social distancing, they come and invade my personal space on purpose) if they catch me in a line at the grocery store. Others call me far too paranoid and that I and those my age, if we die from Covid should simply accept it was our time or that we deserve to die!  Why is it that I and my fellows are being oppressed so massively by the local church leadership!
    Is there anyone out there that can help us, that will hear our pleas?  We are praying.  The scientists I know are praying.  It is NOT that the scientists are not religious, they may be some of the most religious people I know.  It seems that religion is rejecting those that study and research and it is a TERRIBLE thing right now and the past year.
    I have difficulty correlating secular history and what we find in religion, but I am deeply religious and I always seek to see if I can find the bridges between the two.  We may not have found them yet, but it does not mean they are not there.  I can understand the problems people have between the two.
    However, when it comes to science, how many caught up in religion simply scoff at it seems to be growing in numbers, especially over the past year during this pandemic.
    I have probably written too much and gone to far, but the feeling of oppression coming at me and many of those I know from their various church leaders is hard.   I would have thought that if anyone, the Church leadership would not have tossed science aside (and in the past the Church has been very forward in it's scientific views at times).
    It seems the prophet and at least one apostle has integrated science into their prayers and thoughts, but they have done very little to alleviate the pain and suffering from those in my position who are, even at this time, having the greatest amount of oppression coming from the local leaders and some of the more fanatical members of the church.  However, the oppression is real and I know no relief.  If there is any leader with the power to aid us at this time who reads these boards...I pray they would help us.
    However, I'm losing hope.  I don't think anyone cares about those of us in my situation anymore.  AS I said, I've probably written too much.  I had my emotions triggered...but it's not the fault of the writer of the post I responded to, just the ovewhelming sense of antagonistic comments and sarcastic mockery that the ward and stake leadership have tossed at me at taking the things and precautions suggested for us to take seriously.  I have never felt so alone in the gospel.
    Which is why, when I say, as someone who is DEEPLY religious and devoted to the gospel...it's not the scientist or the researchers, or even the university professors who don't want to integrate and study religion, it is some of the more fanatical in religions that have rejected us.
  22. Haha
    askandanswer reacted to mirkwood in Simpler Vocabulary   
    Huh?
  23. Like
    askandanswer reacted to scottyg in Simpler Vocabulary   
    “It is true intelligence for a man to take a subject that is mysterious and great in itself, and to unfold and simplify it so that a child can understand it”
    John Taylor
  24. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Traveler in Simpler Vocabulary   
    It is my personal belief that when possible we should speak to what can be understood.  However, there are limits.  When I was in the army the level was such that I refused to use half of the words of the common vocabulary.   The biggest and most common objection I have heard in regards to our missionaries is that they are more suited to teach children than adults.  It is my personal belief that the L-rd can use many different talents - even among missionaries.  That the L-rd will bring a missionary that can speak to the understanding of those seeking to learn.  I would personally tell your daughter to listen to the spirit and speak as directed.
     
    The Traveler
  25. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Vort in Quantum stuff is scary   
    This sounds so obvious that it's shocking to see how many times it fails.
    Those who attempt to use religion to further or bolster their science seem often to fall into something like the "young earth" trap, because the Bible says blah blah blah. Religionists tend to have a very strong mental model of how things work, and are often unwilling to adapt their views to scientific observations. They are used to arguing their way out of conundrums by citing (or twisting) scripture or religious teachings to conform to their will. In many religions, doing this is considered a virtue, almost a high art. This is the polar opposite of a scientific attitude. In other cases, those who would embrace religion are too timid or sometimes just plain too uninformed to reconcile some scientific idea with their religious viewpoint; in such cases, it is often the religious viewpoint that is made to conform, resulting a a viewpoint that is simultaneously bad religion and bad science.
    Similarly, those who try to use science to inform their religion commonly fall into all sorts of errors, such as trying to falsify unfalsifiable things or refusing to acknowledge verifiable things. More often, they just bungle the attempt to apply their scientific training or insights to religious concerns in a useful manner. A stellar example of this is Donald Knuth's fascinating 1999 MIT six-lecture series on religion and religious concerns titled "Things a Computer Scientist Rarely Talks About" ("to Others Within His Field", I assume is the unspoken part of the title). Hearing one of the smartest men alive today talking so naively about religion (and Knuth is very religious, actively so—he's a Lutheran) is eye-opening. That's not to say he has no valid insights; the opposite is true. But on the whole, his scientific and mathematical training doesn't really inform his religious insight. Not positively, anyway. Listen for yourself and see if you agree with me. (Note that Dr. Knuth has a pronounced stutter, which some may find distracting.)
    It seems to me that the approaches to the two areas are fundamentally different, to the point that there is not as much cross-over as one might at first think. That is not to say there is NO crossover, because there certainly is substantial common ground. But religion and science proceed from two very different viewpoints. In my experience, one area informs the other much less than I have believed in the past that they should and would.