askandanswer

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  1. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    My comment here will be a bit of a diversion from the main discussion but this is just what occured to me as I read the above. If it is a good thing to become a King and a Priest unto God and a king of kings and lord of Lords, and I believe that it is, and if this benefit is achieved primarily through one's posterity, then it seems as if those who have had greater opportunities to have more posterity, specifically, those who engaged in plural marriage, will have some advantages over those who have not engaged in plural marriage. I've often thought that one's situation in the celestial kingdom and opportunities for advancement there will have more to do with one's overall righteousness and obedience in this life rather than the number of one's posterity. 
    I'm also a little puzzled by the idea that becoming the father of many fathers who will have sons of their own from generation to generation will somehow add to my glory because no matter how many sons I have, I will continue  to be someone else's son and therefore have the same status/relationship towards my father as my sons will have towards me. 
  2. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Vort in Quantum stuff is scary   
    Inasmuch as prayer is believed to be, or result in, some sort of communication, or transfer of information between God and man, possibly mediated through the Spirit, and that this communication seems to happen at a speed uninfluenced by distance, the idea of quantum entanglement is the only possibility I have been able to come up with so far that might shed some light on how the Spirit communicates with us.
    On a related matter, can the influence and operations of the Holy Ghost be understood as some sort of field? (I have only a very vague idea of how the term “field” is used in physics and what it means, even though I have read several definitions)
  3. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Just_A_Guy in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    1.  Certainly more kids—and plural marriage, if it enables you to have more kids—would be an “advantage”, if there were some sort of competition between exalted beings.   But of course, there isn’t.        They exist in perfect harmony and righteousness; and whatever state of progression any exalted being is currently at, all the others are sure to get there—eventually, at their own pace, but they’ll get there.  
    And yeah, I definitely see the Celestial Kingdom as a place of advancing in knowledge and personal qualities.  But at some point one is just plain perfect and omniscient; and I think at that point the primary opportunity for progression is through human relationships—both qualitatively and quantitatively.
    2.  Yes, and that’s the thing I love about the patriarchal order:  it runs both ways, backwards and forwards through time and eternity.  Kingship isn’t just a function of the power and authority you wield, but of the venerable legacies to which you are a lawful heir.
    As a son and grandson and so on, I rejoice in the legacies and goodness and accomplishments of my parents, and their parents before them, and on back through eternity as I get to know that line more perfectly.  As a father and grandfather and so on, I glory as I have opportunities to mentor and see the accomplishments of those who come after me and reflect upon my own role in maintaining and continuing that chain of righteousness and watch the sheer number of my posterity increase on into infinity.
  4. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    My comment here will be a bit of a diversion from the main discussion but this is just what occured to me as I read the above. If it is a good thing to become a King and a Priest unto God and a king of kings and lord of Lords, and I believe that it is, and if this benefit is achieved primarily through one's posterity, then it seems as if those who have had greater opportunities to have more posterity, specifically, those who engaged in plural marriage, will have some advantages over those who have not engaged in plural marriage. I've often thought that one's situation in the celestial kingdom and opportunities for advancement there will have more to do with one's overall righteousness and obedience in this life rather than the number of one's posterity. 
    I'm also a little puzzled by the idea that becoming the father of many fathers who will have sons of their own from generation to generation will somehow add to my glory because no matter how many sons I have, I will continue  to be someone else's son and therefore have the same status/relationship towards my father as my sons will have towards me. 
  5. Like
    askandanswer reacted to JohnsonJones in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    It depends on what you consider human spirits.  Those that fell at the time were those who had the ability to become mortal men and woman like us, but whether that composes the entirety of what people consider 'demons' today is unclear.  We know that 1/3 of the host of heaven fell, but there is much we do not know and which the scriptures do not tell us.  Of that 1/3 that fell, they would be considered 'demons' by many religions today.
    Not all of them were chosen at the fall in LDS theology.
    Yes, someone who goes to hell can become a 'demon' as you would put it, however, that does not necessarily apply to everyone who goes to their in spirit.  We have a belief that the atonement of Jesus Christ is an extremely powerful thing and that it can save all men from Hell if men so desire to be saved from Hell.  They must accept the atonement of the Savior (and if they are ignorant of it, it will be taught to them) and he will still be able to save them if they so desire.  Those will not become 'demons' as we would understand it.   You could say it is sort of like the Catholic version of Purgatory, except in our version if they completely reject the Lord, they will truly end up in Hell rather than being saved.
    Yes.  The inference is that a Son of  Perdition is someone who will not accept the atonement of Jesus Christ.  Such have been named in several instances in the Bible and normally, when the Lord calls someone a Son of Perdition or Perdition it indicates some very severe things.  The site for our Church has this to say about Perdition and Sons of Perdition...
     
  6. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from marge in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    Here is the entry under the term "Angels"  from the Bible dictionary of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This is part, maybe most, of the LDS doctrinal explanation of Angels. And the short answer to your second question about whether a human can become an Angel in Heaven, as indicated in the doctrinal explanation below is yes.
    Its nice to see another Aussie on here - there are not many of us around on this discussion board.  
     
    https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/scriptures/bd/angels?lang=eng
    Angels
    These are messengers of the Lord and are spoken of in the epistle to the Hebrews as “ministering spirits” (Heb. 1:14). We learn from latter-day revelation that there are two classes of heavenly beings who minister for the Lord: those who are spirits and those who have bodies of flesh and bone. Spirits are those beings who either have not yet obtained a body of flesh and bone (unembodied) or who have once had a mortal body and have died and are awaiting the Resurrection (disembodied). Ordinarily the word angel means those ministering persons who have a body of flesh and bone, being either resurrected from the dead (reembodied), or else translated, as were Enoch, Elijah, etc. (D&C 129).
    There are many references to the work of angels in the Old Testament. In some passages the “angel of the Lord” speaks as the voice of God Himself (Gen. 22:11–12). The word angel is also sometimes used to designate a human messenger, as in JST Gen. 19:15 (Appendix), and may have some application also in Matt. 13:39–42. There is evidence of nonmortal beings who serve God in heaven (1 Kgs. 22:19; Alma 36:22) and also of some who do God’s will and minister to men on the earth (Gen. 28:12; 32:1; 2 Sam. 24:16; 1 Kgs. 19:5–7; 2 Kgs. 1:15; 19:35; Ps. 91:11).
    We find angels mentioned by name in Dan. 8:16; 9:21; 10:13, 21; 12:1; Luke 1:19, 26. In latter-day revelation we learn that the angel Michael is Adam, and the angel Gabriel is Noah (HC 3:386).
    In the New Testament there are many references to the ministry of angels but no clear statement as to their nature or their relation to mankind in general. Angels attended on our Lord throughout His life on earth (Matt. 1:20; 2:13, 19; 4:11; 28:2–8; Luke 1:11–20, 26–30; 2:9–15; 22:43). Jesus often spoke of angels (Matt. 13:14–30, 37–41; 16:27; 18:10; 22:30; 24:36; Luke 15:10, etc.). The Sadducees did not believe in supernatural beings, but the Pharisees believed in both angels and spirits, which fact Paul used to his advantage when brought before the Sanhedrin (Acts 23:7–9). Other New Testament references are Acts 7:53; 1 Cor. 4:9; 6:3; 11:10; Gal. 1:8; 3:19; Col. 2:18 (where we are warned against worship of angels), and throughout the Revelation of John. There are references to fallen angels in 2 Pet. 2:4 and Jude 1:6.
    The scriptures speak of the devil’s angels. These are those spirits who followed Lucifer and were thrust out in the war in heaven and cast down to the earth. See Rev. 12:1–9; D&C 29:36–38; Moses 4:1–4; Abr. 3:27–28; and as alluded to by Peter and Jude cited above.
    Latter-day revelation contains much about the nature, ministry, and identification of angels. See 2 Ne. 32:2–3; Alma 12:28–29; 13:24–26; Moro. 7:29–31; D&C 7:6–7; 13; 27:16; 76:21; 110:11–16; 128:21; 129; 132:16–18. Angels do not have wings (HC 3:392).
    The word angel is used in various ways. A person who is a divine messenger is called an angel. Thus Moroni, John the Baptist, Peter, James, John, Moses, Elijah, and Elias all ministered to Joseph Smith as angels. These all shall be exalted and inherit celestial glory. The scriptures also speak of another class of persons who, because of failure to obey the gospel, will not be exalted and will become angels in eternity. These are spoken of as angels in Matt. 22:29–30 and D&C 132:16–18. This latter designation should not be confused with the use of the term angels having reference to the heavenly messengers sent forth to minister to the inhabitants of the earth.
  7. Thanks
    askandanswer reacted to Just_A_Guy in Isaiah 13: 19 - 20 and wikipedia   
    It has been said of a recent high-profile politician (who shall remain nameless due to forum rules!) that his followers take him seriously but not literally, while his critics take him literally but not seriously.
    I take Isaiah very seriously.  But I also view it as a work of literature that deploys a variety of techniques—including hyperbole, at times—to make a larger point.  Isaiah was condemning wicked peoples and cultures, not arbitrarily cursing particular geographical locations.  Even assuming that Hillah indeed corresponds with the location on of ancient Babylon, I’m not particularly worried that its modern habitation constitutes a violation of prophecy.  
  8. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeuroTypical in What is a burning in the bosom?   
    A topic on this discussion for me immediately raises as yet unresolved questions about the relationship between the spirit and the body and how a spiritual experience can be felt/experienced as a physical sensation. The physiology of the process is intriguing and I like to think that because the process involves some sort of physical experiencesome aspects of how the Spirit works might be open to scientific exploration. 
  9. Haha
    askandanswer reacted to NeedleinA in Adult Child of Record   
    Does your son live in Colorado and have a ward clerk that looks like?:

  10. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Carborendum in What is a burning in the bosom?   
    I've actually learned that the "burning in the bosom" is downstream of the real feeling of the Spirit.  It is not really dependable to the uninitiated because that same feeling (or at least a very similar one) can be simulated through other causes such as excitement, desire, etc.)
    The way you can recognize the difference is by experience.  For instance I hope you remember my bread analogy.
    First step:  Truly learn to listen to our conscience.  We know what that feels like.  We know that confidence, that peace, that strength that comes from doing what is right when it is clearly right or wrong (good and evil).  This takes experience to really understand that feeling.  But that's the way life is.
    Second step: Remember that our conscience only deals with good/evil sort of things.  The Spirit will extend that feeling to areas where it may not be a matter of good and evil.  Should I take this job or not?  It may require gathering proper information, weighing options, considering pros/cons, etc.  IOW, we need to "study it out in our minds" first. Then ask God if it is right.
    As we do these things, we will LEARN what the Spirit feels like over the course of much experience.  But we cannot gain that experience if we never spend time listening to our conscience first, and then exercise the study and prayer over many questions in our lives.
    It is after all this that we can learn to distinguish between the warm, peaceful, enduring, and empowering burning in the bosom due to the Spirit vs. the wild, almost chaotic, short term, and sometimes enervating burning in the bosom due to human emotion.
  11. Sad
    askandanswer reacted to Traveler in Are we losing our rising generation?   
    I believe there is a talk show host here in the USA (Rush Limbaugh) that says children's minds are full of mush.  I think he says this because their minds are easily molded and susceptible to all kinds of ideas.  What is left out of this discussion is that by time a person reaches adulthood - which is most definitely reached when one obtains an advanced college degree - that mush turns into a harder substance than any stone; which makes learning anything new impossible.
     
    The Traveler
  12. Like
    askandanswer reacted to laronius in Doctrine and Covenants 7: 5 - 6   
    I think the Lord is perhaps also factoring in degree of difficulty points. When speaking to the three Nephites he talked about them still experiencing sorrow for the evil in the world that apparently the dead are largely free from. John would likewise be willingly subjecting himself to this sorrow in order to work in far less pleasant circumstances than I think we find in the spirit world. But these conditions also create opportunity and so John was willing to make that sacrifice because he knew of the increased good he could do. But like @Vort said that's a difficult thing to desire. I think we see a microcosm of this in the experiences of Alma and Ammon. Alma was an absolutely amazing man who would go preach the gospel, sometimes amidst horrifying circumstances, and would then go home, rest up and then go out again. Meanwhile Ammon dedired to commit the rest of his life if necessary to the hated enemy the Lamanites, perhaps never to return home again. Upon meeting years later Ammon experienced a depth of joy that even Alma couldn't. This is nothing against Alma nor should we think less of Peter but there seems to be a whole nother level of love and willing sacrifice that very few in this life attain to. I think Alma and Peter would have agreed to similar assignments if called but there are those who seek such service out and that's a rare trait.
  13. Haha
    askandanswer reacted to Jamie123 in What the Heck Just Happened?   
    Perhaps it turned into a wave! 😯
  14. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeedleinA in What the Heck Just Happened?   
    I have the same thing on my car. They're cheap, effective, easy to use and make a significant contribution to road safety. 
  15. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeuroTypical in What does a “unified” nation look like in terms of politics?   
    I would aid a legal system as a necessary component of a nation - a legal system fits well with the idea of the rule of law, and is quite a seperate thing from the economy, military and political system. 
    The question of what does a unified nation look like in terms of politics makes me wonder whether the European Union is becoming more or less of a nation, and whether England has become more or less of a nation by leaving the EU. THe EU's political. legal and economic systems have been more integrated in recent decades but there still seems to be strong resistance to the idea of an EU standing military.
  16. Sad
    askandanswer got a reaction from Traveler in Government argues in support of paid sex workers   
    This article appeared in the main daily newspaper in my jurisdiction last August. It was written by our local Minister for Health. In summary, the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, which has the power to make legally enforceable decisions, has upheld the right of participants in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) to receive tax payer funded support for sex therapy. The Minister for Health wants that coverage to include payment for the services offered by sex workers but the federal Minister is opposed to the idea and appealed the decision of the Tribunal to the Federal Court. I’ve copied the whole article here because I think its behind a pay wall.
    AUGUST 13 2019 - 12:00AM
    Attitudes towards sex therapy for people with disabilities are outdated
    Rachel Stephen-Smith The Administrative Appeals Tribunal recently ruled that sex therapy should be considered a "reasonable and necessary support" for a National Disability Insurance Scheme participant. This is a good thing.
    As Matthew Bowden, co-chief executive of People with Disability Australia has said, sex is "a very ordinary thing". The ACT government agrees.
    Our view is that the tribunal's decision upholds human rights and is in line the fundamental objectives of the NDIS - to enable people with disability to live an "ordinary life" with choice and control over the reasonable and necessary supports to achieve their goals. We recognise that sex and intimacy are part of an "ordinary life" and reject the view that people with disability should not be entitled to enjoy this aspect of life.
    In making his ruling, the deputy president of the tribunal, Brian Rayment, found that sexual release, to the extent the participant was able to achieve it, was "good for her mental wellbeing, her emotional wellbeing and her physical wellbeing". This reflects abundant research demonstrating the physical and psychological benefits of sex.
    It is clear that the Commonwealth is taking a moral position, not one based on concerns about fiscal sustainability. 
    However, people with disability have also noted that this AAT decision is limited in its application, as it explicitly considers only the services of a sex therapist, not the use of sex workers.
    Canberrans were fortunate to have Jenni and David Heckendorf in our community for many years (they moved to sunny Queensland in 2018), raising awareness about the fact that people with disabilities sometimes need the help of a sex worker to support their intimacy needs. In their case, these services have supported their lives as a married couple, but single people have sexual needs too.
    Unfortunately, the National Disability Insurance Agency continues to oppose the inclusion of sex therapy in the participant's plan, and the Minister for the NDIS, Stuart Robert, has stated that the AAT decision will be appealed to the Federal Court.
    Minister Robert has justified this position on the basis that "these services are not in line with community expectations of what are reasonable and necessary supports".
    It is clear that the Commonwealth is taking a moral position, not one based on concerns about fiscal sustainability. Last week I wrote to Minister Robert and my state and territory counterparts to let them know the ACT government disagrees with the Commonwealth's view. I also informed Minister Robert that the ACT would not support any move to amend the NDIS rules on participant supports to preclude support for sex therapy, sex work or services aimed at sexual release. These are known as Category A rules, so changing them requires the agreement of all states and territories.
    The ACT government believes that suggestions the NDIS should not support sex therapy, sex work or services aimed at sexual release reflect an outdated attitude that sees people with disability as asexual and undeserving of sexual intimacy or release.
    Any move to preclude funding of such services would result in further discrimination against people with disability and work against the objective of social inclusion by reinforcing negative stereotypes. That's not happening on my watch.
    Rachel Stephen-Smith is the ACT government's Minister for Disability Two days ago the Federal Court rejected the appeal so now the federal Minister plans to change the legislation to prohibit tax payer funds from the NDIS being used to pay for people who deliver sex services. Several state government are opposed to the federal governments position. Here is the reaction of one of the tax payer funded media outlets of the federal Minister’s response to the Federal Court’s decision.
    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/disability-advocates-condemn-stuart-robert-s-crass-comments-about-ndis-access-to-prostitutes
    I never thought I'd see the day when one level of government is arguing in favour of using tax dollars to pay for the service of sex workers. I suspect that the efforts of the federal Minister to prevent this will be unsuccessful as changing the rules would require the agreement of the State and Territory governments, and several of them seem to be in favour of the idea. 
    @Jamie123 how does the NHS deal with situations like this?
     
     
     
  17. Okay
    askandanswer got a reaction from Anddenex in Doctrine and Covenants 7: 5 - 6   
    I find it a bit difficult to agree with the idea that Peter was to be a ministering angel to John and James - I though he was more in the role as senior member of the First Presidency, with John and James as his counsellors, although ideally, as we all know, the best leaders are the best ministers.
    I also don't think the analogy works so well - Peter was indeed going home, but at home, he still continued working in the Lord's vineyard - just a different part of the vineyard and almost certainly in a work that had the same ultimate objective as the work that John was happy to continue doing in this part of the vineyard.
    On a less important matter, I'm a little puzzled at the use of the word work in this context. Wouldn't the word service better captures the essence of the idea?
  18. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from marge in Conclusions from D&C 132: 16 - 17?   
    Here is the entry under the term "Angels"  from the Bible dictionary of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This is part, maybe most, of the LDS doctrinal explanation of Angels. And the short answer to your second question about whether a human can become an Angel in Heaven, as indicated in the doctrinal explanation below is yes.
    Its nice to see another Aussie on here - there are not many of us around on this discussion board.  
     
    https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/scriptures/bd/angels?lang=eng
    Angels
    These are messengers of the Lord and are spoken of in the epistle to the Hebrews as “ministering spirits” (Heb. 1:14). We learn from latter-day revelation that there are two classes of heavenly beings who minister for the Lord: those who are spirits and those who have bodies of flesh and bone. Spirits are those beings who either have not yet obtained a body of flesh and bone (unembodied) or who have once had a mortal body and have died and are awaiting the Resurrection (disembodied). Ordinarily the word angel means those ministering persons who have a body of flesh and bone, being either resurrected from the dead (reembodied), or else translated, as were Enoch, Elijah, etc. (D&C 129).
    There are many references to the work of angels in the Old Testament. In some passages the “angel of the Lord” speaks as the voice of God Himself (Gen. 22:11–12). The word angel is also sometimes used to designate a human messenger, as in JST Gen. 19:15 (Appendix), and may have some application also in Matt. 13:39–42. There is evidence of nonmortal beings who serve God in heaven (1 Kgs. 22:19; Alma 36:22) and also of some who do God’s will and minister to men on the earth (Gen. 28:12; 32:1; 2 Sam. 24:16; 1 Kgs. 19:5–7; 2 Kgs. 1:15; 19:35; Ps. 91:11).
    We find angels mentioned by name in Dan. 8:16; 9:21; 10:13, 21; 12:1; Luke 1:19, 26. In latter-day revelation we learn that the angel Michael is Adam, and the angel Gabriel is Noah (HC 3:386).
    In the New Testament there are many references to the ministry of angels but no clear statement as to their nature or their relation to mankind in general. Angels attended on our Lord throughout His life on earth (Matt. 1:20; 2:13, 19; 4:11; 28:2–8; Luke 1:11–20, 26–30; 2:9–15; 22:43). Jesus often spoke of angels (Matt. 13:14–30, 37–41; 16:27; 18:10; 22:30; 24:36; Luke 15:10, etc.). The Sadducees did not believe in supernatural beings, but the Pharisees believed in both angels and spirits, which fact Paul used to his advantage when brought before the Sanhedrin (Acts 23:7–9). Other New Testament references are Acts 7:53; 1 Cor. 4:9; 6:3; 11:10; Gal. 1:8; 3:19; Col. 2:18 (where we are warned against worship of angels), and throughout the Revelation of John. There are references to fallen angels in 2 Pet. 2:4 and Jude 1:6.
    The scriptures speak of the devil’s angels. These are those spirits who followed Lucifer and were thrust out in the war in heaven and cast down to the earth. See Rev. 12:1–9; D&C 29:36–38; Moses 4:1–4; Abr. 3:27–28; and as alluded to by Peter and Jude cited above.
    Latter-day revelation contains much about the nature, ministry, and identification of angels. See 2 Ne. 32:2–3; Alma 12:28–29; 13:24–26; Moro. 7:29–31; D&C 7:6–7; 13; 27:16; 76:21; 110:11–16; 128:21; 129; 132:16–18. Angels do not have wings (HC 3:392).
    The word angel is used in various ways. A person who is a divine messenger is called an angel. Thus Moroni, John the Baptist, Peter, James, John, Moses, Elijah, and Elias all ministered to Joseph Smith as angels. These all shall be exalted and inherit celestial glory. The scriptures also speak of another class of persons who, because of failure to obey the gospel, will not be exalted and will become angels in eternity. These are spoken of as angels in Matt. 22:29–30 and D&C 132:16–18. This latter designation should not be confused with the use of the term angels having reference to the heavenly messengers sent forth to minister to the inhabitants of the earth.
  19. Like
    askandanswer reacted to laronius in Doctrine and Covenants 7: 5 - 6   
    I think the work on this side of the veil is "greater" at least in a quantitative way in two ways. One is that the dead are reliant on the living to perform any needed ordinances. So the work on this side truly affects both sides. Also the ability to progress seems much more enhanced while in the flesh and there is a deadline attached, death, both of which makes the work here perhaps more urgent and even substantial, though maybe that's not the best word for it. But from a qualitative perspective it's all the same importance.
  20. Thanks
    askandanswer reacted to Just_A_Guy in Are we losing our rising generation?   
    I am in SS presidency, so I sit in on every youth class (I have to start the meeting) and have had to pinch-hit teaching a couple times.  And I agree—the challenge with Zoom teaching is to make it a *discussion*, not a *lecture*, even though the format really lends itself to the latter and not the former.
    I look at teaching in church as comparable to surfing—you can’t precisely follow a pre-charted course; rather, you look for (and sometimes, make) waves and then try to ride them wherever they take you, making course corrections as the wave evolves.  I care less about imparting an encyclopedic knowledge of the subject matter, and more about leaving the students *wanting to know more* about the day’s key concept, knowing where to find more, and having had an enjoyable and spiritually edifying experience during the day’s class.
    A few things I’ve seen and/or tried via Zoom that, taken together, have given some moderate success:
    —one teacher makes it a point to log in before any of the kids.  As each one logs in he greets them in turn, by name, and builds a little rapport; with I find is reciprocated later in the lesson.
    —I expressly ask the kids at the beginning of the session to turn on their video if possible.
    —The really great teachers I’ve seen a) are careful to ask well-thought out, engaging lessons that don’t always have clear or easy answers (in other words—they don’t just ask whatever questions are in the manual); and b) are willing to offer their own insights in answer to those questions.  At least for me—I’m an introvert, and I consider it somewhat invasive for someone to ask me to share an opinion about a gospel topic.  I won’t usually open up and give a personal perspective unless I see the teacher willing to do the same thing.
    —I’m still looking at new ways for students to interact.  Zoom has some polling features that we’ve had some fun with.  I’ve sometimes shown a Gospel-related piece of art (preferably a semi-obscure one that the students aren’t likely to have seen before) and invited the students to offer reactions to it; soliciting special input from students who I know are into art/drawing about the composition, lighting, and so on.  Sometimes I’ll announce that we’re going to show a video—and before starting the video I’ll call on 5-10 students and let each of them know that after we watch the video I’ll ask them to answer a specific question about a part of the video.  (I find people are more willing to speak out in class if they’ve had some time to think about their answers.). Zoom has a whiteboard feature that I need to explore more.
    —I am finding that PowerPoint, during Zoom lessons, is generally overrated.  Too often it locks the teacher into a structure and the teacher doesn’t feel free to spontaneously explore topics that students may raise during the class; and it also pre-programs classes into trying to offer a “right” answer instead of speaking from the heart. Plus, visually, it reduces me to a tiny little window and removes the human aspect of the lesson.  I want my students to see ME and talk to ME, not some disembodied voice-over while they stare at pre-programmed blocks of text.
    —Also:  I’m not a great video producer by any means, but I try to make sure that the video of my headshot is as appealing as possible—decent lighting, proper camera position, nice but not overpowering/distracting background, good posture, etc. 
  21. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Jamie123 in Government argues in support of paid sex workers   
    I've certainly never heard of anyone (disabled or not) getting free prostitutes on the NHS - though that's no guarantee of anything. If it ever did happen, I suspect the tabloids would have a lot of fun with it!
    Tangential comment: This reminds me of a sci-fi story by C.S. Lewis called "Ministering Angels". It's set on a research station on Mars, manned entirely by male astronauts. The mission directors on Earth have decided that this is unhealthy, and have therefore sent women to satisfy the men's needs. However, only two women have volunteered: a rather prickly middle-aged academic who thinks only in terms of clinical necessity, and a very loving and compassionate career prostitute, a few years past her prime. It's a very short tale, but quite insightful.
  22. Sad
    askandanswer got a reaction from Traveler in Government argues in support of paid sex workers   
    This article appeared in the main daily newspaper in my jurisdiction last August. It was written by our local Minister for Health. In summary, the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, which has the power to make legally enforceable decisions, has upheld the right of participants in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) to receive tax payer funded support for sex therapy. The Minister for Health wants that coverage to include payment for the services offered by sex workers but the federal Minister is opposed to the idea and appealed the decision of the Tribunal to the Federal Court. I’ve copied the whole article here because I think its behind a pay wall.
    AUGUST 13 2019 - 12:00AM
    Attitudes towards sex therapy for people with disabilities are outdated
    Rachel Stephen-Smith The Administrative Appeals Tribunal recently ruled that sex therapy should be considered a "reasonable and necessary support" for a National Disability Insurance Scheme participant. This is a good thing.
    As Matthew Bowden, co-chief executive of People with Disability Australia has said, sex is "a very ordinary thing". The ACT government agrees.
    Our view is that the tribunal's decision upholds human rights and is in line the fundamental objectives of the NDIS - to enable people with disability to live an "ordinary life" with choice and control over the reasonable and necessary supports to achieve their goals. We recognise that sex and intimacy are part of an "ordinary life" and reject the view that people with disability should not be entitled to enjoy this aspect of life.
    In making his ruling, the deputy president of the tribunal, Brian Rayment, found that sexual release, to the extent the participant was able to achieve it, was "good for her mental wellbeing, her emotional wellbeing and her physical wellbeing". This reflects abundant research demonstrating the physical and psychological benefits of sex.
    It is clear that the Commonwealth is taking a moral position, not one based on concerns about fiscal sustainability. 
    However, people with disability have also noted that this AAT decision is limited in its application, as it explicitly considers only the services of a sex therapist, not the use of sex workers.
    Canberrans were fortunate to have Jenni and David Heckendorf in our community for many years (they moved to sunny Queensland in 2018), raising awareness about the fact that people with disabilities sometimes need the help of a sex worker to support their intimacy needs. In their case, these services have supported their lives as a married couple, but single people have sexual needs too.
    Unfortunately, the National Disability Insurance Agency continues to oppose the inclusion of sex therapy in the participant's plan, and the Minister for the NDIS, Stuart Robert, has stated that the AAT decision will be appealed to the Federal Court.
    Minister Robert has justified this position on the basis that "these services are not in line with community expectations of what are reasonable and necessary supports".
    It is clear that the Commonwealth is taking a moral position, not one based on concerns about fiscal sustainability. Last week I wrote to Minister Robert and my state and territory counterparts to let them know the ACT government disagrees with the Commonwealth's view. I also informed Minister Robert that the ACT would not support any move to amend the NDIS rules on participant supports to preclude support for sex therapy, sex work or services aimed at sexual release. These are known as Category A rules, so changing them requires the agreement of all states and territories.
    The ACT government believes that suggestions the NDIS should not support sex therapy, sex work or services aimed at sexual release reflect an outdated attitude that sees people with disability as asexual and undeserving of sexual intimacy or release.
    Any move to preclude funding of such services would result in further discrimination against people with disability and work against the objective of social inclusion by reinforcing negative stereotypes. That's not happening on my watch.
    Rachel Stephen-Smith is the ACT government's Minister for Disability Two days ago the Federal Court rejected the appeal so now the federal Minister plans to change the legislation to prohibit tax payer funds from the NDIS being used to pay for people who deliver sex services. Several state government are opposed to the federal governments position. Here is the reaction of one of the tax payer funded media outlets of the federal Minister’s response to the Federal Court’s decision.
    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/disability-advocates-condemn-stuart-robert-s-crass-comments-about-ndis-access-to-prostitutes
    I never thought I'd see the day when one level of government is arguing in favour of using tax dollars to pay for the service of sex workers. I suspect that the efforts of the federal Minister to prevent this will be unsuccessful as changing the rules would require the agreement of the State and Territory governments, and several of them seem to be in favour of the idea. 
    @Jamie123 how does the NHS deal with situations like this?
     
     
     
  23. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeuroTypical in Quantum stuff is scary   
    I sometimes think about the theological implications of quantum mechanics. I'm sure there are some, but I haven't figured out what they are yet. I suspect that quantum mechanics is one of the tools that God uses to do some of the things that He does.
  24. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NeuroTypical in Quantum stuff is scary   
    I sometimes think about the theological implications of quantum mechanics. I'm sure there are some, but I haven't figured out what they are yet. I suspect that quantum mechanics is one of the tools that God uses to do some of the things that He does.
  25. Thanks
    askandanswer reacted to Jamie123 in Quantum stuff is scary   
    I'd recommend Wolfgang Smith to you as well. I posted a short review of "The Quantum Enigma" on this site a couple of years back, though take what I say about it with a pinch of salt.
    Also I definitely recommend you read "The Quantum Enigma" before you attempt to read "Physics and Vertical Causation". The former is much easier-going, and the latter is hard-going even if you do have the grounding from the first book.