Grunt

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Everything posted by Grunt

  1. Good. That's the kind of president I want. Sit at home and ignore us.
  2. Lots of pretty morally crappy people do good things. I wouldn't call them role models, though. Then again, society considers many depraved individuals to be role models.
  3. Not yet! #FakeNews
  4. Is it more than normal, or is it just that you're getting to the age that it's your formative favorites that are dying?
  5. We may see it differently, but I live it. I like to think I have a clearer picture and more facts. My position isn't emotional, it's derived from years of experience home and abroad.
  6. If it breaks out as a succession, it very well could end with one side winning. That isn't what we're discussing, though. With a succession you have 2 standing armies slugging it out. The US Army fighting citizens with ARs wouldn't be the battle. You'd have, to use the same example, the northern army fighting the southern army and both sides would have the modern tech and capabilities that came with their territories. An insurrection, where the discussion of armed civilians comes more into play and what this discussion was about when I entered, is people from the block going against the government. To use your example, what do you think would happen if the US Government nuked a domestic city? What do you think the average military member's reaction would be? What would happen if the US used their advanced firepower in Miami? What percentage of Soldiers called to carry out that strike would participate? Would it endear the locals and state to the government? Would it cause locals to back down, or join the cause? Would escalation cause more Soldiers to turn their guns on their neighbors, or back down? It doesn't matter how good the Army's firepower is if Soldiers won't wield it and if wielding it turns more people against the government. Soldiers see themselves as protectors of freedom and America. They don't seem themselves as the armed thugs of politicians. Like I said, this gets chess boarded at high levels regularly. It's not a great outcome for politicians. Heck, we saw what would happen in many places on January 6th. Police/Soldiers opening the doors and welcoming them in.
  7. I'm hardly an expert. The biggest factor you seem to be missing is the US military isn't the US government, and the US military can't do anything to the populace.
  8. You're absolutely wrong. Why? Because they can't drop the bomb on Dallas. Asymmetric warfare is very difficult for organized armies and that is compounded when both sides are domestic. The military has been chess boarding this for decades. Asymmetric warfare is hard enough to win in foreign lands. It doesn't matter if you have the best tech. That's why we've had issues in the Middle East, Asia, Africa, etc. It's easy for us to go in there and stomp the government or factions we are after. However, the voids are soon filled by others. That's why we rarely last in those places. We spent 20 years stomping muddles in the Taliban. Guess who runs Afghanistan now? The US is no different. First, you're asking Soldiers from the US to whack citizens from the US. Even with an incredible propaganda campaign, it's not sustainable. What happens when you drop the bomb on Dallas? What happens to everyone in the military who have relatives in Dallas? What happens to the rest of Texas? Are Texans going to say "yep, they deserved it" and sit back, or have you just radicalized more people across the country? We don't need to guess, we've seen it play out time and time again in foreign countries. It's multiplied domestically. Like I said, it's been chess boarded constantly. They actually train for it in Robin Sage and other exercises. I'm certainly not naive to the technology of the army. The army would have a very difficult time stomping an insurrection of any size, regardless the weapons they used.
  9. I think you have it backwards. The "insecurity" people feel as a result of gun ownership is a false sense of insecurity.
  10. What you're describing has existed since the dawn of time. We each assess our own risk independently, and weight that risk differently. If you look at the number of homes in the U.S. and the number of house fires annually, you aren't likely to have a house fire this year. However, many of us have fire extinguishers. If you look at the number of miles driven in total each year and the number of serious car accidents per mile driven, you aren't likely to need your seatbelt, yet we mandate seat belt usage in many states and many of us wear one anyway. My sister refuses to swim in the ocean because she's afraid a shark will eat her. In New England, that isn't very likely at all. However, she's passed that fear onto her children, and they makes sure everyone they go to the beach with knows they shouldn't be in the water. Given the number of schools in the U.S. and the number of school shootings each year, you aren't likely to need your active shooter training, or nuclear blast training, or even fire drill training. yet we do it. The frequency we do it is often driven by our fear, rational or not. The world has always had something that made them feel insecure. As a result, they've always had something to make them feel better in response to that insecurity. People carrying firearms doesn't add to any person's actual insecurity.
  11. The military will most assuredly be divided in the conflict and an armed local populace will absolutely give a hesitant domestic army a run for its money.
  12. I'm hoping that it gains traction as we use it so we can get more features. Lots of our youth don't have phones, so a web version would be nice. Oddly, we have youth with Fire tablets but the app isn't in the Amazon store. You can add people to circles. If you wanted, you could add all your SS teachers to the presidency circle, it would just no longer be the presidency circle. I also don't think they'll fall off when released like the other circles do, either. Custom circles would be nice, though.
  13. Yeah. I'm trying to use it for youth. There doesn't seem to be a consistent way to communicate and schedule events that includes the parents outside of this app. Anything else we've tried to get people to use seems to be a hassle.
  14. Does anyone use this? I have a list of issues I'm trying to resolve in communication, planning, etc. It looks like the Circles tab would resolve much of this, but nobody uses it. I suppose that might be because they have no reason to use it and this might provide one. Additionally, many youth don't have phones or tablets to use it on and it isn't web based at this time.
  15. You aren’t missing a thing. We are cautioned even in those “rare things”
  16. No. He asked me to talk then participate in a Q&A.
  17. I've never spent much time on their website and don't know that much about them at all. Sometimes being on this website doesn't feel right. I just chuckle when people dismiss some things they don't know anything about.
  18. That's quite a description for a group you never even heard of until today.
  19. As my kids get older I get far more involved with the school in both volunteer and elected positions. I really strive to know what's going on at al levels. One of the biggest wake-up calls I had was simply walking into the school library.
  20. We had a GA at stake conference not address this directly, but essentially said that if you're following the world, not the church, you'd better wake up and get onboard.
  21. I'm not a member of the JSF, I only cited them as an example.
  22. Gave a talk at Stake Conference with a GA. That's not nerve-wracking or anything.