Nordic saint

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  1. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Fether in Judgement and attributing motives   
    Well, Joseph Smith did say this:
    "It is better, said Joseph Smith, to feed ten impostors than to run the risk of turning away one honest petition"
    This principle can be applied to not just food but to any judgement we make

  2. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Backroads in President Nelson vaccinated   
    Yeah... if the vaccine was so dangerous, God would have stopped the prophet from doing it and even urge others to do so.... I'll get the shot
     
     
     
     
     
     
  3. Okay
    Nordic saint reacted to Just_A_Guy in Conference Talks   
    Smackdowns to both the hard left and the hard right; and comeuppance to me over my doom-and-gloomism regarding this country’s future . . .
  4. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Backroads in Boring General Conference   
    General conference is supposed to be relevant for the time, not to please us with deep teachings or things WE think is important... so no, I don't see it as boring but important spiritual instruction/insight
     
    However, general conference has barely begun, we'll see what else is in store for us
  5. Thanks
    Nordic saint reacted to Carborendum in Do people's attitudes affect what the Church teaches and how it operates?   
    I think this example is a good discussion point.  I view it as another example of the Samuel Principle.  People mistakenly believe this means that we can "change the mind of God" if we simply complain or disobey enough.
    No.
    All this means is that the Lord recognizes that even if He were to continue commanding us and teaching us, we would still disobey anyway.  So, why continue teaching the truth when we refuse to hear it.  It just places us under greater condemnation.
    Does it make it right?  No.  If it is an eternal principle, it is still wrong no matter what.
  6. Thanks
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Carborendum in The Beast   
    Yeah, I was wondering about that as well. I do believe that John was referring to Nero but also that the beast and its mark is not just one single person or concept but rather the spirit of it which continues until Jesus says: it is enough. During the ages we have seen rotten leaders who behave just like him, blaming and persecuting the saints or the seekers. A corrupt and tyrannic ruler.
    But I'm just guessing here. sadly, the church anything official about it... which is also why I'm guessing that it at least refers to Nero since he probably wouldn't have spiritual significance to us (maybe)
  7. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Vort in Do people's attitudes affect what the Church teaches and how it operates?   
    Well, the first thing that came to my mind was the Savior's words when He said:
    "Moses because of the hardness of your hearts suffered you to put away your wives: but from the beginning it was not so"
    So I would say yes, the attitude of the people can affect teachings and operation.... To a certain degree. I don't believe that God surrenders to our opinions and sins and make compromises. However, I do believe that God adapt the church to work so as many as possible can be saved without violating the celestial laws

  8. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Backroads in President Nelson vaccinated   
    Yeah... if the vaccine was so dangerous, God would have stopped the prophet from doing it and even urge others to do so.... I'll get the shot
     
     
     
     
     
     
  9. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Backroads in President Nelson vaccinated   
    Yeah... if the vaccine was so dangerous, God would have stopped the prophet from doing it and even urge others to do so.... I'll get the shot
     
     
     
     
     
     
  10. Thanks
    Nordic saint got a reaction from prisonchaplain in Conference October 3-4, 2020   
    Well, we are discouraged to use the short form LDS. However, when you refer the people themselves, you can definitely say things like "Latter-day saint culture"... it even has lesser syllables than for example "evangelical culture" 😁
    Reference:
    "When referring to Church members, the terms "members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints," "Latter-day Saints,” "members of the Church of Jesus Christ" and "members of the restored Church of Jesus Christ" are preferred. We ask that the term "Mormons" and "LDS" not be used."
    https://newsroom.churchofjesuschrist.org/style-guide
     
  11. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from JohnsonJones in Milton Berle on US movie ratings   
    Personally I'm very careful about what I watch no matter the rating. I was invited to watch a movie in the cinema with a G rating with my sister, and I thought "well, can't do any harm watching a "childish" movie. Well... It contained sex scenes (and of course, it was adultery just to make it even worse), full body nude scenes and heated up homosexual scenes... Let's just say that I still haven't fully recovered.
     
    Moral of the story: even though this is an extreme case, it shows that just because a movie has a certain label, you never really know if it has been made so that The Lord would approve it. Parental guides and alike are still the best guidelines for whether the movie reflects your standards or not
  12. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from NightSG in I'm so excited!   
    If I may say, and this is just a guess based on observations..... I think it's because we as a whole have forgotten Him in our doings. When I hear members talk about church stuff, I rarely hear The Lord mentioned. It's more focused on things we do practically like the Word of Wisdom, self reliance, and family history. While these definitely are good things, people outside of the church will not associate us with The Lord if we don't show that we do such things because of Him. think about it, we even got commanded to focus on the church's proper name instead of "Mormons". Plus, since we often have used Moroni as a symbol, quite a few think that we worship angels.
  13. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from NightSG in I'm so excited!   
    If I may say, and this is just a guess based on observations..... I think it's because we as a whole have forgotten Him in our doings. When I hear members talk about church stuff, I rarely hear The Lord mentioned. It's more focused on things we do practically like the Word of Wisdom, self reliance, and family history. While these definitely are good things, people outside of the church will not associate us with The Lord if we don't show that we do such things because of Him. think about it, we even got commanded to focus on the church's proper name instead of "Mormons". Plus, since we often have used Moroni as a symbol, quite a few think that we worship angels.
  14. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in A logical explanation for why Hell is not literally fire and brimstone.   
    Two toughts:
    1:  being burned alive is one of the most (if not the most) painful way to die. now, doing that in fire and brimstone eternally is quite a strong picture for not being in God's precence. Only one who really despise God would wish for that
     
    2:  It's indicated that Gehenna was used as a rubbish heap at the time of jesus. If it's true, a pile of waste burning day and night would make people think twice about risking being compared to that
     
     
  15. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Vort in A logical explanation for why Hell is not literally fire and brimstone.   
    It's quite interesting because Brigham Young's (and Joseph Smith's) descriptions COULD indicate what has been told that heaven for one person would be hell for another (eternal burnings vs fire and brimstone)
  16. Like
    Nordic saint reacted to person0 in A logical explanation for why Hell is not literally fire and brimstone.   
    ANSWER:  Because being fully and completely cut off from God and the Light of Christ is already the worst pain and torment that is possible.
    During a sacrament talk today, the speaker was discussing how he explained the plan of salvation to a colleague who asked if Latter-Day Saints believe in Hell.  He did not address this particular issue, but I started pondering on the difference between our understanding of Hell and that of the traditional Christian world.
    I started considering what would be a simple way to explain to someone why it is unnecessary to view Hell as a torment of literal fire and brimstone; this thought is what followed.  It rang very true to me and was, in a way, a small epiphanic moment, so I thought I'd share.
  17. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Vort in A logical explanation for why Hell is not literally fire and brimstone.   
    It's quite interesting because Brigham Young's (and Joseph Smith's) descriptions COULD indicate what has been told that heaven for one person would be hell for another (eternal burnings vs fire and brimstone)
  18. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Vort in "Deep doctrine": Understanding the basics or chasing the mysteries?   
    Usually when I hear people talk about deep doctrines they either refer to:
    1: Mormon folklore and conspiracy theories (Cain is Big Foot, Hillary Clinton is the beast from The Book of Revelation)
    2: Doctrines or anything religiously related that a person think is too complicated and is put off by it (Jesus is also our father (by covenant), a steel sword was discovered in Jericho)
     
    To me, deep doctrine should indicate the richness, the wisdom of the doctrines that has been revealed (don't only forgive seven times but seventy times seven... that one has so many sweet layers)
  19. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Vort in "Deep doctrine": Understanding the basics or chasing the mysteries?   
    Usually when I hear people talk about deep doctrines they either refer to:
    1: Mormon folklore and conspiracy theories (Cain is Big Foot, Hillary Clinton is the beast from The Book of Revelation)
    2: Doctrines or anything religiously related that a person think is too complicated and is put off by it (Jesus is also our father (by covenant), a steel sword was discovered in Jericho)
     
    To me, deep doctrine should indicate the richness, the wisdom of the doctrines that has been revealed (don't only forgive seven times but seventy times seven... that one has so many sweet layers)
  20. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in David Snell article: Why, David?   
    Those essays though are not criticizing but are analysis and discussions. It's not that you take up sensitive topics but how you handle them and for what purpose
  21. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from Midwest LDS in David Snell article: Why, David?   
    ... that's what you get out of writing late at night 😝
    What I meant was that people at the same time need to come out of the illusion that prophets (and us) are supposed to be perfect people who don't make mistakes (in other words, a celestial being). There has only been one person on the earth who have accomplished that 🙂
  22. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from MrShorty in David Snell article: Why, David?   
    I don't agree with the obsession there has been for a while now with seeking the faults of past leaders (or the present for that matter), even if the intent is good. It takes away the focus of what really matters, the plan of salvation, when we just put our focus on man's mistakes.
    On the other hand there's another extreme: the obsession of making the prophets stand on pedestals like Greek gods, making them seem as perfect as possible and wipe away the dirt. It's a dangerous tendency as well. You can't argue against a perfect being so the Adam-God theory has to be true, right? If not, the so-called perfect prophet has to be a false prophet. I can go on with this, but get the point.
     
    You are supposed to take the whole package of a prophet, not just what you like or what you dislike... It ruins what a prophet really is: an ordained MAN of GOD. I have no problem with talking about a prophet's faults if it's relevant for the occasion, but I would never dare to focus on it. At the same time I won't tolerate that people I know think we're supposed to be gods on earth.
    Sometimes a sinner but always a saint
  23. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from MrShorty in David Snell article: Why, David?   
    I don't agree with the obsession there has been for a while now with seeking the faults of past leaders (or the present for that matter), even if the intent is good. It takes away the focus of what really matters, the plan of salvation, when we just put our focus on man's mistakes.
    On the other hand there's another extreme: the obsession of making the prophets stand on pedestals like Greek gods, making them seem as perfect as possible and wipe away the dirt. It's a dangerous tendency as well. You can't argue against a perfect being so the Adam-God theory has to be true, right? If not, the so-called perfect prophet has to be a false prophet. I can go on with this, but get the point.
     
    You are supposed to take the whole package of a prophet, not just what you like or what you dislike... It ruins what a prophet really is: an ordained MAN of GOD. I have no problem with talking about a prophet's faults if it's relevant for the occasion, but I would never dare to focus on it. At the same time I won't tolerate that people I know think we're supposed to be gods on earth.
    Sometimes a sinner but always a saint
  24. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from dprh in Evangelical Christian has nice things to say about us   
    Absolutely 🙂 here it is:
    “The way it was done was thus: Joseph would place the seer-stone in a deep hat, and placing his face close to it, would see, not the stone, but what appeared like an oblong piece of parchment, on which the hieroglyphics would appear, and also the translation in the English language, all appearing in bright luminous letters. Joseph would then read it to Oliver, who would write it down as spoken. Sometimes Joseph could not pronounce  the words correctly, having had but little education; and if by any means a  mistake was made in the copy, the luminous writing would remain until it was corrected. It sometimes took Oliver several trials to get the right letters to spell correctly some of the more difficult words, but when he had written them correctly, the characters and the interpretation would disappear, and be replaced by other characters and their interprinterpretation" (Welch: "The Miraculous Translation of the Book of Mormon" from Book of Mormon Central)
     
    Joseph Smith wasn't doing the translating work as we understand it, rather, the seer stone (or urim and thummim depending on which ones he would use) functioned as a perfect Google translate where the English words were given on a silver plate. The "problem" with using a young uneducated farmer to bring forth this book is that it's too much to ask for to translate a dead language the way that we would do it scientifically. But as shown above, the original text was still converted to the English language by the power of God (maybe it would be more correct to say that God did the actual translation, but that's just nitpicking)
  25. Like
    Nordic saint got a reaction from dprh in Evangelical Christian has nice things to say about us   
    Absolutely 🙂 here it is:
    “The way it was done was thus: Joseph would place the seer-stone in a deep hat, and placing his face close to it, would see, not the stone, but what appeared like an oblong piece of parchment, on which the hieroglyphics would appear, and also the translation in the English language, all appearing in bright luminous letters. Joseph would then read it to Oliver, who would write it down as spoken. Sometimes Joseph could not pronounce  the words correctly, having had but little education; and if by any means a  mistake was made in the copy, the luminous writing would remain until it was corrected. It sometimes took Oliver several trials to get the right letters to spell correctly some of the more difficult words, but when he had written them correctly, the characters and the interpretation would disappear, and be replaced by other characters and their interprinterpretation" (Welch: "The Miraculous Translation of the Book of Mormon" from Book of Mormon Central)
     
    Joseph Smith wasn't doing the translating work as we understand it, rather, the seer stone (or urim and thummim depending on which ones he would use) functioned as a perfect Google translate where the English words were given on a silver plate. The "problem" with using a young uneducated farmer to bring forth this book is that it's too much to ask for to translate a dead language the way that we would do it scientifically. But as shown above, the original text was still converted to the English language by the power of God (maybe it would be more correct to say that God did the actual translation, but that's just nitpicking)