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Found 12 results

  1. A little background: My husband is a convert. He joined in 2008, served an LDS mission, and we have been married since his return (2011). We have 2 daughters here on earth and 1 angel in heaven. He has been lying and drinking behind my back for the past six months and I finally confronted him. He's not sorry for drinking and breaking his covenants, or for being unworthy of the priesthood. He doesn't really want to change. He's only sorry for how it has made me feel, and has said just that. It feels like everything church related has been for me, to get me. I wouldn't date him cause he wasn't mormon. He became mormon. I wanted to marry a returned missionary. He became one. I thought no one would do that just to be with me, but currently, it sure feels like he did all that just for me. Which is never what I wanted. So in addition to having the burden of doing everything gospel related in the home, I also feel like it's my own fault. He lied to me for 6 months. He doesn't feel like he needs to talk to the bishop, or stop drinking, since he isn't addicted. But he'll do those things if I want him to. I told him I don't want him to do it for me. That he needs to do it because he wants to, not for me, and that until he gets there he should do what he wants. But despite all this, he says he has a testimony. He also got really angry at me and said what have I done for the church, since I didn't go on a mission and he did. Where do we go from here? Counseling? Divorce? Who can I turn to? Who can I tell? I feel all alone. And that I am failing everyone around me.
  2. My church (Assemblies of God) just re-affirmed our stance against the consumption of alcohol, adding the prohibition for ministers to our bylaws. At least one individual didn't like it, and went went to social media to post that he supposed Jesus would not be welcomed among us (he turned water to wine and consumed wine at the Last Supper). Of course, by his logic most states (even true-blue Washington) would not allow Jesus to drive donkeys either.
  3. I'm a nevermo from a background where I was exposed to many LDS friends (outside of idaho, utah, or arizona, no less). I've met with missionaries multiple times and read/prayed about the BOM, but never received any spiritual confirmation or feelings on the matter. I do, however, have a weird, random affinity with the WoW. Whenever I have gone to sacrament meetings, it's always brought up, even if it wasn't a planned subject. It's common for me to go to church and hear, "We were going to talk about X, but stuff happened so we're talking about the WOW today." My lifestyle is pretty opposite to the Wow, other than my appreciation of bread. I'm addicted to coffee (have at least 2 strong cups a day), I like a beer or glass of wine to unwind after work, legally smoke cannabis to get sleep, and every year or two partake in illegal party drugs and smoke cigarettes. I was reflecting on my health and the direction it was going, and thought it would be a great idea to try following the WoW to the letter for a month for non-spiritual reasons, then seeing how I feel. This would include things like using meat sparingly (I was thinking of being vegetarian at home, but eating some meat during holiday get-togethers and extended family dinners) , incorporating more seasonal veggies and fruits I wouldn't otherwise eat, and the "classic" no alcohol/coffee/tea/drugs. Are there any suggestions or "words of wisdom" you might have for me before I start? How do you feel about a non-LDS person living the WoW?
  4. I know about the Word of Wisdom. But I am curious about many things. I know we don't use caffeine or any other harmful substances that may harm our bodies as our bodies are Temples and are sacred. But what does the Church say about Herbal Tea? No caffeine. What if there's a tea that has good effects on the body? Ginseng, Red Ginseng, Rosea, and many other teas have health benefits. I am assuming that the church is saying not to consume teas with caffeine (green and white teas have a little flouride which is harmful), but what about other teas? Also, I want to ask you if Supplements are allowed in the church. I could not find any reference about taking supplements in the church. I had depression. and I had psychiatrist and psychologist. They have prescribed my Zoloft, and Flouxetine (a long time ago). I found out about this stuff and it's even more harmful for the body during prolonged use and brain as the updated news have confirmed it through scientific research. I asked my doctor about it and he confirmed that there are many side effects on these antidepressants! So I got off it. Now, I still had depression, but when I started to research about alternative medicine, I tried L-tyrosine, 5HTP, Mucuna Pruriens, Vitamin C, and other supplements....I've never felt any better! It works for me! I don't think these supplements are harmful unless taken in excess (anything in excess can be harmful), but I'm curious...what does the LDS Church say about taking supplements too?
  5. I live in the Kingdom of Seahawks. There are more “12th-Man” flags than there are American ones. Seattle deserves to enjoy a good sports team now and then—we’ve had so many heartbreaks. Still, it almost seems cultish to walk into Starbucks, Target, or even some banks, and see the staff wearing the same uniforms. During the late 80s I taught in Asia. The government was a military dictatorship at the time. To counter cries for freedom and democracy leaders employed a “3-S policy.” They made sports, screen and sex (red light districts) readily accessible. Keep people entertained, they figured, and they won’t revolt. Of course poorer countries have relied on government-subsidized alcohol for generations. Even the turmoil over sex and gender identity causes me to wonder if we are missing the deepest meanings of life. If I am who I sleep with, or I am how I feel psychologically about my gender—if these matters constitute my core identity, then self-fulfillment remains the highest order. What if God really made us? What if our Creator loves us? What if He has plans for us? Does it matter? Are we too distracted to notice or care? Good games are great! Our intimate relationships connect us with love—the highest good. Movies can be powerful and meaningful. However, true joy comes from God. He is love. Life’s ultimate meaning is to reconcile with Him and discover his good plans for our lives.
  6. Coping is a sign of resilience, strength and hope. It’s a powerful mechanism for getting through a hard season of life. However, it’s no way to live. Coping ought to be a transitory stage, not a permanent circumstance. I can't cope! When we hear this—or say it—life is a mess! Often, something has been exposed: Alcoholism or drug use, an eating disorder, porn addiction, or even “chexting”—cheating by texting. We feel overwhelmed, and are tempted to give in. We may give ourselves over to the mess, badly abusing drugs, food, porn, or people. When the matter becomes desperate, suicide tempts our frayed souls. We may think that if we kill ourselves we will quit hurting others, and stop allowing the mess to control us. Realistically, many will die—fully immersed in their mess. Some will claim to have stopped the madness by killing themselves. Yet, they still die in their mess, and they still hurt the ones they loved. King Solomon proved his wisdom when he said: There is a way that appears to be right, but in the end it leads to death. Struggle demands that we cope so we can live with it. I want to cope. I am sick and tired of being sick and tired, but I want to live! I want to control my drinking, my drug use, my eating, and my devotion to my spouse. Through coping I can say that I am okay. I know that I am an alcoholic, a drug abuser, an anorexic or bulimic, or one given to lust—whether by porn, or by illicit relationships. So, I learn to cope. For drugs and alcohol a may join an AA-type group, or even enter into a residential rehabilitation program, like Teen Challenge. Over time the temptation softens, but seldom leaves. Sometimes recovery meetings seem like the same old same old. Residential programs are strict and feel insulting—especially in the early stages. There is struggle. It is the same for eating disorders, porn viewing, and other sexual temptations. They all demand our time. They also impose controls, Arriving at the place of being able to cope seems like a worthy goal. After a tragedy, or after the revelation of a life-controlling issue, a loved one may ask how we are doing. If we smile and say, “I’m coping,” there is relief. However, if there is no known struggle—then what? If we just asked someone we care about how they are doing, and the response is, “I’m coping,” what do we think? Coping must give way to overcoming. It is not life, but rather the transition back to life. Alcohol, drugs, eating disorders, pornography, infidelity, and life-controlling issues will assail us our whole lives. If we overcome an issue, we will always have extra boundaries that help us resist relapse. We never get to say we beat the battle. Instead, we thank God daily for our victories. We celebrate them. Admitting struggle with life-controlling issues is necessary and important. Knowing the areas we must guard against is crucial. Humility towards past struggles is wise. Nevertheless, let us not be afraid to declare the win. Let us not live by coping, but rather cope, so we can live. When it comes to the temptations that come at us, 1 John 4:4 offers the conclusion to the matter: You, dear children, are from God and have overcome them, because the one who is in you is greater than the one who is in the world.
  7. prisonchaplain

    Who's in control?

    In the Garden of Eden, before Adam and Eve took the forbidden fruit, they were in perfect relationship with God. They had dominion, or control, over the Earth. Nothing in creation controlled them. Not drugs, not alcohol (the gateway drug), not food--not even sex. If we are saved, redeemed, born again, then, by God's grace, let us return to our place of dominion. Let us be free from all created bondage!
  8. Is it a sin to pray after comsuming alcohol? I feel at one stage to the lowest days and pains in my life that i actually feel the need of praying while i had alcohol in my system. I have been through alot with my seperation that i decided to drink but felt it wasnt enough and felt the urge to pray.. is it a sin ?will god still hear my prayer?? I felt at the time that i opened out was more freely to express myself to him.. Was that a bad thing i did?? Actually felt like he i was connecting to him & pouring my heart out to him. I wasnt intoxicated just drank to drown my sorrows but at the same time felt i neede to pray. Can anyone help me pls?
  9. I guess I've never really had a healthy, righteous relationship with a member of the opposite sex. Ever since I moved away for college things have gone even further downhill. (I don't mean to encourage anyone to be like me because I have not been good/happy.. so I hope bringing up this subject isn't against the rules. if it is, srry!) Sinning over the last year has been a slippery slope. I'm worried because I've developed an indifferent attitude. I've met with my bishop in the YSA ward. I do love the church and believe in it. I just don't know if I have or can get the will to change. I'll be completely honest- I like getting attention. My issues are in not keeping the word of wisdom or the law of chastity. The thing is, I know I can't go on like this forever. I don't know how to end friendships that aren't the best to keep. Also I got depressed when I had the morning after pill in a way.. Like I know it is not a good idea to have a child in my situation, but I still felt sad for some reason. How do I get the will to change? How do I break off friendships? Any suggestions? Thanks!!!
  10. ThatLDSKiD

    Word of Wisdom?

    Just curious...is non alcoholic beer contrary to the Word of Wisdom? What about E-Cigs? Why is only herbal tea permitted? Why is coffee prohibited? Just a curious kid, not trying to be blasphemous. Thanks!
  11. I know it's a relatively trivial, and highly personalized Word of Wisdom-related question, but where do you personally stand on cooking with, or eating something cooked in alcohol?
  12. I'm discussing the WOW with a friend, and I'm trying to find the doctrinal support about the change from allowing member-made alcohol " And, behold, this should be wine, yea, pure wine of the grape of the vine, of your own make." D&C: 89:6, to no alcohol at all. I remember learning about it in one of my classes one day recently, but I can't remember the details and my journal from that time has gone missing.