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NJWindow

US lds in China can be likened to the people of the Book of Mormon!?

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The thought came to my mind after listening to two months of teleconference sacrament meeting in China. Why? It is because I noticed that almost no anecdote of exchange between US expatriates and local Chinese has been mentioned or referred to in the sacrament meeting talk or in the testimonies given.

What are talked about, of people, are mostly about families back in the States, news of home wards, etc., and about co-expats here, and none else. I felt as if these people are here in China, but their topics, their minds are basically facing back toward America. And their associations are limited among co-expatriates themselves. So the comparison to the people of the Book of Mormon, where neither the Nephites nor the Lamanites mentioned the local natives at all though they moved into a new land.

Writing the thought I noticed that the major reason for this is to be found in the enormous difficultness of the language, Chinese to the Westerners. But still I think it is expected of the visitors who would stay for a substantial length of time to learn and speak the local language. It is part of newcomers obligation and courtesy. And aren’t lds known for their ability to speak foreign languages?

(The thought is posted in my Japanese blog NJWindow(J) dated 29 Oct. ‘09)

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I hope that as the gospel grows in China, that the people will feel like they are at home exactly where they are.

I served my mission in the states but taught many people from China who were here for extending schooling purposes. I didn't ever baptize any of them but it was an experience I will never forget and parts of my heart somehow long for my people who went back to Beijing.

It seems you are from Japan. I would love to get to know more about your experiences. Welcome to the forums.

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I have to agree with Miss Halfway. Bruce R. McConkie I believe gave a talk about Zion and where Zion is. Zion is wherever you are and profess and love the gospel. Whether that be in the United states, Japan, or China.

I think so much emphasis in the church and the states is because it is were Joseph Smith was when he restored the Gospel. The Church office buildings are here. But now that there are more saints outside of the US I would like to see in the church news and more focus on those saints as well. I think it's moving in that direction as I see more stories of Saints in other parts of the world.

The Church is not all about the United States.

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I am looking forward to coming to China next year to teach English. I just discovered recently, the ESL career. I had watched 'Mao's Last Dancer' one night, and the next day, with a troubled mind, I entered a fast food store. Putting my troubles aside for a bit, I weighed up my options of whether I was going to ask for an icecream or chips, then an oriental looking young lady walked along behind the counter in front of me and like a light going on in my head, I just knew I should go to China, and I was glad. I actually didn't put that thought there myself. That night I decided to look for a job in China and found to my surprise, a teaching position that required no experience and I was ecstatic. I applied for the job and at this time, I'm waiting for the final decision. Even if the job doesn't go through, I will apply for another job there. I'm really looking forward to living and teaching in China. The language seems difficult but I'm willing here and there, to give it a try. China, especially ancient China, has usually fascinated me. I thought I'd have to wait until the Millenium to go there but the opportunity has come earlier than I expected. I'm very excited. From the age of 9, I spent 8 years in another culture so I think that's been a good learning experience there and I've been through culture shock twice since. I can't wait to go. I, in a way, feel like I'm going into the land of the Lamanites but this is only in regard to the fact that the gospel isn't officially in China yet. I feel like I'm at the end of the road in my own land, which is Australia. After I decided to go to China, I found out that my sister's husband's nephew was in Harbin, teaching English, too. What I know about China is probably mostly what I've seen in movies. I have admired Bruce Lee since I was about 10 and loved the tv series 'Kung Fu' and the movie 'Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon'. I'm excited to go to China on more than one level. It was good reading your post.

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Thanks very much for your comment. Welcome to the net and the forum. I am very pleased to know a person like you has great interest and enthusiasm in coming to China. I wish you the best of luck.

What I would desire of you is that you try to mingle among the local people and become friends with them to open exchange relationships.

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Definitely. I can't wait. That to me, seems the most logical thing to do. I think that there are alot of people in Western countries that admire certainly, many aspects of ancient China. There is, I believe, a fascination of their martial arts too. I spoke to my brother a few weeks ago and I was also very surprised to learn that he too, had considered teaching English in China - I couldn't believe it. He's married with four children. He has his reasons for not pursuing that avenue at this particular time though, but I'm hoping that my example to him will cause him to look again at the real prospect of him and his family going to China, maybe even sooner that he thinks. I'm sure he can do it. He's a very strong man. My mother also, who is already a qualified school teacher and piano teacher, is very interested in atleast coming over for a holiday she said, if I end up going, which I will go to China, and maybe even she will consider teaching English over there too. She's certainly not afraid to mingle. She's very friendly with people.

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Isn't the church recognized over in China? I know when they took over Hong Kong they got wards, stakes and a Temple, and I haven't heard of the Temple being closed down. Perhaps it isn't any further than Hong Kong for now, I don't know.

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I don't know too much about the details, but yes, the Hong Kong temple is still operating and so too are the limited number of branches that are in China. The church is probably recognised in China, but it is against the law for missionaries or anyone else, to preach the gospel over there.

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The thought came to my mind after listening to two months of teleconference sacrament meeting in China. Why? It is because I noticed that almost no anecdote of exchange between US expatriates and local Chinese has been mentioned or referred to in the sacrament meeting talk or in the testimonies given.

What are talked about, of people, are mostly about families back in the States, news of home wards, etc., and about co-expats here, and none else. I felt as if these people are here in China, but their topics, their minds are basically facing back toward America. And their associations are limited among co-expatriates themselves. So the comparison to the people of the Book of Mormon, where neither the Nephites nor the Lamanites mentioned the local natives at all though they moved into a new land.

Writing the thought I noticed that the major reason for this is to be found in the enormous difficultness of the language, Chinese to the Westerners. But still I think it is expected of the visitors who would stay for a substantial length of time to learn and speak the local language. It is part of newcomers obligation and courtesy. And aren’t lds known for their ability to speak foreign languages?

(The thought is posted in my Japanese blog NJWindow(J) dated 29 Oct. ‘09)

Perhaps it is time to reassign our sacrament talks in China for not only about those in the states, but those who began this great legacy for the Chinese’s Saints.

One thing I can attest, Brother of Jared spends time in China before crossing the Pacific Ocean. Something to think about…adding more depth to this legacy of the people who first came to this land. ;)

Edited by Hemidakota

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One thing I can attest, Brother of Jared spends time in Southern China before crossing the Pacific Ocean.

How can you possibly attest to this? Surely you are not openly revealing a private revelation you received that you are totally unauthorized to reveal.

Are you?

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> I'm a current ESL teacher in China. Fascinating country, and I've loved almost every minute I've had here.

Welcome! Or you are the one who welcomes me. I like your comment. I have quite a similar feeling since I came here in Harbin in August this year.

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> I'm a current ESL teacher in China. Fascinating country, and I've loved almost every minute I've had here.

Welcome! Or you are the one who welcomes me. I like your comment. I have quite a similar feeling since I came here in Harbin in August this year.

Oh my gosh - You're in Harbin?

It's 11, 000, 000 people and this is a long shot in the dark, but... You don't happen to be teaching at the Lucky Kids Club, do you?

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I would rather liken him to be Ammon who served a king and his people of Lamanites. Ambassador Huntsman has a Chinese name and adopted a Chinese orphan and reared her. He seems to be well received by Chinese media and citizens.

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Having lived abroad, I can relate well with NJWindows' remarks on expats in China. The same applies almost everywhere. People rarely mingle in a foreign country, much less learn the language skills necessary to really communicate. People tend to gravitate toward those most like themselves--who speak their language and come from their culture. I studied for a time in Taiwan and noticed that Americans all hung out with other Americans. This applied to Mormons as well. In Mexico, American LDS attended English speaking wards. In Sao Paulo, they live in essentially American neighborhoods where everything is just like it is in America. And in Saudi Arabia, almost everyone, especially the westerners, live on compounds that keep a wall between you and the natives. The Brits like to laugh at Americans there--while many may have lived in Saudi for a decade or two, they get their news about Saudis from American TV and about the only time they step off the compound and actually see the natives up close and personal is on their way to or from the airport before or after vacations. But then when they're back in the US, they'll tell you all about the natives. It's difficult to feel comfortable around peoplle who come from a completely different culture even when you're living, so to speak, in their culture. It takes a lot of work, and it's just easier to mingle among those of your own kind. Perhaps that's what the LDS concept of the next life amounts to--who you end up living with depends on who makes you feel most comfortable. Just a thought.

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How does one go about getting jobs teaching English in places like Tailand and China? I have heard you do not need to have a college education to do it. My sister is wanting to go someplace just to get away from things and work. She wants exotic so maybe this is a good idea?

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To: Sean 1427

Thank you very much for your post. Your remarks express just what I feel about many of the Latter-Day Saints in China. My first posting is what I drew out from many sentiments, spontaneous utterances I heard in the teleconference sacrament talks and testimonies. However, there are fine exceptions, of course. And the same thing can be said of many Japanese nationals, too. ... I thank you for your posting as it shows that my perception is not way off the mark.

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No, I'm not. I lived in Harbin, Heilongjiang for five months last year. But now I live in Osaka, Japan, preparing again to go to Harbin for a year from the middle of August. ... In spite of location, lds in China can participate in nationwide lds services made possible by teleconferencing system.

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No, I'm not. I lived in Harbin, Heilongjiang for five months last year. But now I live in Osaka, Japan, preparing again to go to Harbin for a year from the middle of August. ... In spite of location, lds in China can participate in nationwide lds services made possible by teleconferencing system.

Links to jobs? :)

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