1 Nephi chapter 8


thekabalist

Recommended Posts

Guys I have to break this one down as it is very rich in Jewish imagery and I would like to take my time with it. So here's the first part:

1 And it came to pass that we had gathered together all manner of seeds of every kind, both of grain of every kind, and also of the seeds of fruit of every kind.

It was no easy job for them to take seeds of every kind as Torah-law forbids one to sow two different kinds of seed together: “Thou shalt not sow thy vineyard with divers seeds: lest the fruit of thy seed which thou hast sown, and the fruit of thy vineyard, be defiled.” (Deuteronomy 22:9)

So for them to transport all kinds of seed together and make sure they didn’t get mixed in the way would require some extra care considering the amount of seeds they were carrying.

Why does Nephi repeat the term “of every kind” so often? We can see a profound meaning for this when we look at the Hebrew. The expression used for “of every kind” is כל (kol) which has the gematria value of 50. Nephi deliberately uses the word three times and this is not without a profound reason. This would in the gematria add up to 150 which is exactly the number of days that Noah was in the waters of the deluge. So by using this expression Nephi is in a deeper level telling us that they went through the same kind of experience that Noah went through.

Also it’s important to say that both in Noah’s case and in Nephi’s case the number 150 bears a great significance in kabalah. Rabbi Zadok HaKohen Rabinowitz of Lublin explains that this number corresponds to the 50 Gates of Understanding (Nun Sha’arei Binah) of the three lowest levels of soul. These are the means through which G-d gives his Law unto mankind. Noah received direct commandments from G-d and Nephi is revealing that so did he.

2 And it came to pass that while my father tarried in the wilderness he spake unto us, saying: Behold, I have dreamed a dream; or, in other words, I have seen a vision.

Why did Lehi tarry if G-d had already given him a vision about him having to go? If you recall our previous commentaries you will notice that the strong theme of the feast of tabernacles. This feast is followed by a day which is called שמיני עצרת (shemini atzeret) can be interpreted as the eight day gathering or alternatively it has been interpreted by the rabbis as “the day of tarrying”. When you build your tent in the presence of G-d then G-d becomes your host. The “day of tarrying” is a way in which G-d tells us that he wishes for us to stay with him a bit longer.

So this was G-d’s way of telling Lehi: You needn’t rush out of my presence. Stay a bit longer and I will increase to the fruits of your spirituality. This is why he gets a vision.

It is also important to understand that heavy rains may come at any moment at this time of the year. When Lehi makes the decision to stay he risks having to travel under heavy rain. This shows how much he trusted G-d to the care of his journey.

3 And behold, because of the thing which I have seen, I have reason to rejoice in the Lord because of Nephi and also of Sam; for I have reason to suppose that they, and also many of their seed, will be saved.

If Lehi was given a vision why wasn’t he sure about their salvation? Why would he only suppose? The reason for this lies in the Israelite culture. An important Talmudic proverb defines it best:

“Everything is in the hand of heaven except the fear of heaven” (b. Berachot 33b)

As an Israelite Lehi understood that everything lies written in the scrolls of heaven and heaven is in control of everything except for the fear of heaven. So even though he was shown that G-d would provide for Nephi and Sam’s seeds to remain faithful there was still the fear of heaven which depended upon them. This is why Lehi couldn’t be sure and only supposed that it would happen.

4 But behold, Laman and Lemuel, I fear exceedingly because of you; for behold, methought I saw in my dream, a dark and dreary wilderness.

Dark and dreary: This seems remarkably similar to the Hebrew expression (משעמם ומדכא - meshaamen vemedakei) which often is translated only as “dreary” but literally means something like “dreary and depressing”. The idea if of something that is devoid of life. This is confirmed when Lehi says it will be like wilderness

If we consider the theme of the season rain when Lehi says that it is dark one would immediately associate with cloudy. In fact in Hebrew some of the words that can mean “dreary” can also mean “cloudy”. But the season rain despite the darkness it provides a water which is fundamental for the people’s life. In Laman and Lemuel’s case we can see that it is only the darkness without the life that would usually come afterwards. This means that Lehi saw very little hope for his two sons.

5 And it came to pass that I saw a man, and he was dressed in a white robe; and he came and stood before me.

It is astonishing how the theme of tabernacles/eight-day assembly continues. In the feast of Shemini Atzeret it is very common that the person leading the prayers for the rain will wear a white robe during service (a “kittel”).

The kittel usually is white and made of linen and is a symbol of purity that can be achieve with tikkun (repairing) our wrong-doings and through introspective meditation of prayer.

What is interesting about the kittel is that it is also a burial costume and a priestly costume. Josephus in Wars II.8.3 says that the essene priestly sect clothed themselves with white garments. This was done for two reasons: As a symbol of holiness and also as a symbol of death. The first is straightforward but the second is a symbol of mourning for the wickedness of the people and of being dead to that sinful generation.

6 And it came to pass that he spake unto me, and bade me follow him.

7 And it came to pass that as I followed him I beheld myself that I was in a dark and dreary waste.

There are two possible interpretations for the “waste” that Lehi was seeing. The first one is that “waste” could mean an empty space. This as well as the white garment of the man in his vision would indicate that Lehi could have had a vision of שאול (sheol) which is the place of the dead. Sheol means literally “sent” and in Jewish tradition is a place of desolation for no action can be done within sheol

The other alternative would be even worse because if the term “waste” referred to a place where waste was dumped it would be a dreadful place outside the city which often in Jewish imagery would refer to the outer darkness of גיהינום (gehinom) which is popularly translated as hell.

Either way it was a very frightening experience.

8 And after I had traveled for the space of many hours in darkness, I began to pray unto the Lord that he would have mercy on me, according to the multitude of his tender mercies.

9 And it came to pass after I had prayed unto the Lord I beheld a large and spacious field.

10 And it came to pass that I beheld a tree, whose fruit was desirable to make one happy.

This sounds like a typical description of גן עדן (gan eden – the garden of Eden/paradise). What is interesting is that Eden is also associated with the theme of the feast of tabernacles as the Talmud says that in Eden there were 10 tabernacles built by G-d unto Adam:

“R. Hama b. Hanina said: The Holy One, blessed be He, made ten canopies for Adam in the garden of Eden; for it is said: Thou wast in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone [was thy covering, the cornelian, the topaz and the emerald, the beryl, the onyx and the jasper, the sapphire, the carbuncle and the emerald and gold] etc.”

(b. Bava Batra 75a)

The reason we have 10 canopies in Eden according to Jewish tradition is because all the 10 sefirot (emanations of G-d) will be fully tasted there. So when G-d gives Lehi a vision of Eden in connection to the theme of tabernacles it means that Lehi would experience the fullness of G-d’s presence in his life or possible through the life of his seed. This is no small promise by any possible means.

11 And it came to pass that I did go forth and partake of theafruit thereof; and I beheld that it was most sweet, above all that I ever before tasted. Yea, and I beheld that the fruit thereof was white, to exceed all the whiteness that I had ever seen.

Again we see the continuation of the theme of the feast of tabernacles. In such feast we also use an Israeli citrus fruit which is white inside and its called Etrog. It is held together with the four species that were explained previously. You can see it here:

http://www.jewishexponent.com/images/publications/oct122006/etrog.jpg

It is interesting that there are midrashic accounts that relate the Etrog to the garden of Eden. Some rabbis interpret it to be the fruit of the forbidden tree. The fragrance of the Etrog is said to be the “fragrance of heaven”.

The Etrog is associated with something desirable and with life. The Talmud says:

“One who eats etrog will have fragrant children.” (b. Ketubot 61a)

So the Etrog is associated with life. It is commonly believed that those who have a good Etrog in the feast of tabernacles increases the chances of having a fruitful offspring.

What is interesting about Lehi’s dream is that the taste was sweet and the Etrog usually is sour. This could symbolically represent the fact that G-d was not only promising him a fruitful offspring but also that his sour hardships would turn into sweetness. This matches the rest of the description of Lehi’s dream. The Jewish imagery of this vision is very impressive.

12 And as I partook of the fruit thereof it filled my soul with exceedingly great joy; wherefore, I began to be desirous that my family should partake of it also; for I knew that it was desirable above all other fruit.

Pay close attention to the amazing wordplay. Rabbi Nahmanides says that the “Etrog” is an Aramaic word for desire. In fact the more modern Aramaic word “ragag” for desire bears a similarity to “Etrog”. This wordplay is a very traditional Israelite one.

Rachel Adelman has an interesting drasha on this where she says: The Aramaic "Etrog" means simply "hadar" in Hebrew, or חמדה, desire; "pri etz hadar" should then be translated as "the fruit of the tree of desire". Yet how do we know the etrog, the fruit of desire, is Tree of Knowledge? It states: "The woman saw the tree as good to eat, and that is was a delight to the eyes and desirable as a source of wisdom

Edited by pam
paragraph duplicated
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 67
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

It was no easy job for them to take seeds of every kind as Torah-law forbids one to sow two different kinds of seed together: “Thou shalt not sow thy vineyard with divers seeds: lest the fruit of thy seed which thou hast sown, and the fruit of thy vineyard, be defiled.” (Deuteronomy 22:9)

Is this to maintain the purity of the fruit? Is this something that is also taught today? I am curious on this as it seems that we are always trying to mix to make hybrids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is this to maintain the purity of the fruit? Is this something that is also taught today? I am curious on this as it seems that we are always trying to mix to make hybrids.

Yes. Hybridism (mixing seeds) is strictly forbidden by the Torah-Law. Some Jewish rabbis believe that mankind is bringing great evil into the world by attempting to create hybrids. They are not the way G-d created things.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Later, in chapter 11, Nephi is allowed to see the same vision, which gives us some more insight on it's meaning. Nephi calls the tree "the tree of life". Latter-day saints view this vision as an allegory of the last days, mainly because of Nephi's interpretation of the dream. Lehi tends to be more concerned about the implication the dream has on his own family. But we'll wait for chapter 11... :)

Regards,

Vanhin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The other alternative would be even worse because if the term “waste” referred to a place where waste was dumped it would be a dreadful place outside the city which often in Jewish imagery would refer to the outer darkness of גיהינום (gehinom) which is popularly translated as hell.

When I saw the word, "gehinom," it made me think of the word, "gnolaum," (from the Book of Abraham in the Pearl of Great Price, where the foot note says gnolaum is a transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning eternal). Could you explain for me, how these two words would be written or broken down, and is there a comparative contrast between gehinom and gnolaum, as that which I'm seeing? I hope that made some kind of sense. You've got a pre-schooler here when it comes to Hebrew. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You've got a pre-schooler here when it comes to Hebrew.

Even that is more advanced than I am. I think I'm more in the infant stage. I think that's why sometimes I think my questions are silly. But I seriously don't know anything about this..so if silly..that's okay. I can't get answers to my questions if I don't ask.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even that is more advanced than I am. I think I'm more in the infant stage. I think that's why sometimes I think my questions are silly. But I seriously don't know anything about this..so if silly..that's okay. I can't get answers to my questions if I don't ask.

Actually, that's more correct for me too. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I saw the word, "gehinom," it made me think of the word, "gnolaum," (from the Book of Abraham in the Pearl of Great Price, where the foot note says gnolaum is a transliteration of a Hebrew word meaning eternal). Could you explain for me, how these two words would be written or broken down, and is there a comparative contrast between gehinom and gnolaum, as that which I'm seeing? I hope that made some kind of sense. You've got a pre-schooler here when it comes to Hebrew. ;)

Joseph Smith used the word gnolaum to mean something like "eternal". I will defer to thekabalist on its possible Hebrew origins, but to me it looks more like a Greek derivative (γνῶλαυμ). Here is my thinking:

The Greek word γνῶσις (gnosis) means "knowledge" and appears possibly related; Sanskrit gnana means "intelligence" or "wisdom" and appears to be an Indo-European cognate. Interestingly, Joseph Smith taught that intelligence is eternal, so an identity (or at least a connection) between a word meaning "intelligence" or "knowledge" and one meaning "eternal" would be entirely believable.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hidden

He did his best to get it through our heads that the only stupid question is the one we have, but don't ask.

I disagree. Here are some stupid questions:

  • "Officer, if we both know I was going over the speed limit, why are you only giving me a warning?"
  • "Did you know that a little grease along the sides of the blade will let that guillotine make it past my neck?"
  • "Did you know that my password is my birthdate?"
  • She: "Does this dress make me look fat?"
  • He: "Do you want a real answer?"

I'll bet we can come up with a whole list of really stupid questions.

Link to comment

Joseph Smith used the word gnolaum to mean something like "eternal". I will defer to thekabalist on its possible Hebrew origins, but to me it looks more like a Greek derivative (γνῶλαυμ). Here is my thinking:

The Greek word γνῶσις (gnosis) means "knowledge" and appears possibly related; Sanskrit gnana means "intelligence" or "wisdom" and appears to be an Indo-European cognate. Interestingly, Joseph Smith taught that intelligence is eternal, so an identity (or at least a connection) between a word meaning "intelligence" or "knowledge" and one meaning "eternal" would be entirely believable.

Thanks you for sharing your perspective. All I have to go by is the verse and the footnote to gnolaum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This chapter is most fascinating. Here's some additional work:

13 And as I cast my eyes round about, that perhaps I might discover my family also, I beheld a river of water; and it ran along, and it was near the tree of which I was partaking the fruit.

In ancient Jewish imagery a river represents three things:

- A path in which life flows abundantly as the water is the source of life

- An unstoppable cleansing force as the running water is considered by the Torah to be the most purifying element in nature

- A spiritual obstacle as it is something to be crossed. The Jewish Midrash has a tradition which says that Satan turned into a river to prevent Abraham from travelling per order of G-d.

Therefore when Lehi sees a river it means that G-d would provide for him and that through Lehi he would provide cleansing to others but it also indicates that Lehi would have to overcome a spiritual obstacle in the process. The idea of it being near the fruit indicates there would be a spiritual journey ahead of him until he could reach the sweet fruit he would savor.

Why did Lehi say that he beheld a river of water? At first it may sound a bit redundant but it’s definetly not. Lehi was given a vision of Paradise. It is pretty evident that he didn’t give a description of everything he saw as there probably wouldn’t be enough room for Nephi to write about it. One of the elements of Paradise according to Jewish tradition is a river of fire which is associated with judgement: “A river of fire was flowing and emerging from before Him; a thousand thousands served Him, and ten thousand ten thousands arose before Him. Justice was established, and the books were opened.” (Daniel 7:10)

14 And I looked to behold from whence it came; and I saw the head thereof a little way off; and at the head thereof I beheld your mother Sariah, and Sam, and Nephi; and they stood as if they knew not whither they should go.

The reason why they could be unwilling to go is described above: This would represent an obstacle and even though they certainly would welcome the blessings they might not be willing to pay the price that was coming with them.

Head of the river: This is an Israelite expression of wickedness. In ancient times in the land of Israel the districts would be separated by rivers. The governors of such regions are literally called in the Talmud ראש נהרה (resh nahara) which in Aramaic means “head of the river”. These people were seen as extremely greedy as they would only visit the villagers to obtain money. Thus the Talmud describes it:

“R. Zera's father acted as tax collector for thirteen years. When the Resh Nahara [head of the river] used to come to a town, if he [R. Zera's father] saw the scholars [of the city] he would advise them, Come my people, enter thou into thy chambers. And when he saw the other inhabitants of the town he would say to them: The Resh Nahara [head of the river] is coming to the city, and now he will slaughter the father in the presence of the son, and the son in the presence of the father;” (b. Sanhedrin 25b)

So when Lehi describes that they were at the head of the river this is an idiomatic expression meaning that they were only in it for their own greediness. They were not really concerned with the spiritual journey at all.

15 And it came to pass that I beckoned unto them; and I also did say unto them with a loud voice that they should come unto me, and partake of the fruit, which was desirable above all other fruit.

16 And it came to pass that they did come unto me and partake of the fruit also.

Why would Lehi call unto them with a loud voice? In Judaism the expression קול רם (kol ram – loud voice) is associated with rebuking. A loud voice would indicate a strong rebuke against rebellion much like we see in the book of Deuteronomy 27:14 and onwards:

“And the Levites shall speak, and say unto all the men of Israel with a loud voice, Cursed [be] the man that maketh [any] graven or molten image…”

So Lehi was rebuking them for not wanting to partake in a spiritual journey that would pose challenges because they were afraid to lose their possessions. This rebuking apparently works well as we see from them responding by coming and partaking of the fruit as well.

17 And it came to pass that I was desirous that Laman and Lemuel should come and partake of the fruit also; wherefore, I cast mine eyes towards the head of the river, that perhaps I might see them.

It is very interesting that Lehi uses the expression “cast the eyes towards the head of the river” because in Hebrew the word עין (ayin – eye) is an indication of one’s generosity (good eye) or greediness (bad eye). This can be seen from the Talmud:

“What about piercing a cask with a spit on the Shabbat? Does he intend [making] an opening, so it is forbidden, or perhaps his intention is to be a good eye [ie to be generous] and it is permitted?” (b. Shabbat 146b)

We have already seen from before that “head of the river” is an expression that indicates someone that is greedy. So when Lehi “casts his eye to the head of the river” to see if he could find Laman and Lemuel it idiomatically would be understood by an Israelite to mean that Lehi challenged their reasons for not taking part in the spiritual journey. Were they refusing because they were greedily looking at the material possessions they could possibly lose if they chose to take the journey?

18 And it came to pass that I saw them, but they would not come unto me and partake of the fruit.

19 And I beheld a rod of iron, and it extended along the bank of the river, and led to the tree by which I stood.

According to Rashi in his commentary of Psalm 2:9 an iron rod is a poetic euphemism for a sword. The sword in ancient Jewish mysticism is represented by the letter ז (zayin) which in Kabbalah is associated with understanding. So the sword represents the word of G-d which brings understanding to some and judgement to others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thekabalist,

It is a pleasure to meet you. I am Vanhin's little brother. Vanhin has talked much about his interactions with you and your comments and posts both at Christianforums and here. I have since been reading your commentary and insights and it has been a great pleasure.

Insofar as your comments concerning Lehi's Dream, I'm impressed with what you've provided as a possible meaning of the text. In particular, I find your comments on what the rod of iron means to be amazing, especially given the fact that you have not read the Book of Mormon before and have not been taught the Mormon understanding of these things. We understand, as Nephi later indicates, that the rod of iron represents the Word of God.

Anyways, I wanted to introduce myself and thank you for taking so much of your time to add your commentary and other thoughts. I look forward to more. :)

Kind Regards,

Finrock

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cannot wait until you get to chapter 11 and 12 when Nephi sees the same vision, and add some more understanding to it.

Your commentary on the rod of iron was spot on.

18 And it came to pass that I saw them, but they would not come unto me and partake of the fruit.

19 And I beheld a rod of iron, and it extended along the bank of the river, and led to the tree by which I stood.

According to Rashi in his commentary of Psalm 2:9 an iron rod is a poetic euphemism for a sword. The sword in ancient Jewish mysticism is represented by the letter ז (zayin) which in Kabbalah is associated with understanding. So the sword represents the word of G-d which brings understanding to some and judgement to others.

In Chapter 11 verse 25, Nephi learns the following:

And it came to pass that I beheld that the rod of iron, which my father had seen, was the word of God, which led to the fountain of living waters, or to the tree of life; which waters are a representation of the love of God; and I also beheld that the tree of life was a representation of the love of God. (1 Ne. 11:25)

In Chapter 12 Nephi discovers that the river represented the depths of hell:

And the angel spake unto me, saying: Behold the fountain of filthy water which thy father saw; yea, even the river of which he spake; and the depths thereof are the depths of hell (1 Ne. 12:16).

Thanks for you commentary. There is way more there than I have been able to soak in yet, so I may add more of my thoughts on it later.

Regards,

Vanhin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guys,

On the word gnolaum it sounds very much to me like גן עולם (gan olam) which literally means "the eternal garden" and could be a reference to the garden of Eden.

b'shalom!

Very interesting. This word is used in conjunction with the spirit of mankind, in reference to it's eternal nature. Gnolaum, comes from our Book of Abraham, in the Pearl of Great Price.

Howbeit that he made the greater star; as, also, if there be two spirits, and one shall be more intelligent than the other, yet these two spirits, notwithstanding one is more intelligent than the other, have no beginning; they existed before, they shall have no end, they shall exist after, for they are gnolaum, or eternal. (Abr. 3:18)

Regards,

Vanhin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thekabalist,

It is a pleasure to meet you. I am Vanhin's little brother. Vanhin has talked much about his interactions with you and your comments and posts both at Christianforums and here. I have since been reading your commentary and insights and it has been a great pleasure.

Insofar as your comments concerning Lehi's Dream, I'm impressed with what you've provided as a possible meaning of the text. In particular, I find your comments on what the rod of iron means to be amazing, especially given the fact that you have not read the Book of Mormon before and have not been taught the Mormon understanding of these things. We understand, as Nephi later indicates, that the rod of iron represents the Word of God.

Anyways, I wanted to introduce myself and thank you for taking so much of your time to add your commentary and other thoughts. I look forward to more. :)

Kind Regards,

Finrock

Finrock said what I was going to say already. As you read Chapter 11 of this same book, you'll see that the Iron Rod is explained to be the Word of G-d, which is also described as a "sword" in other scripture, that "divides asunder". Thank you again for your insights.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 And I looked to behold from whence it came; and I saw the head thereof a little way off; and at the head thereof I beheld your mother Sariah, and Sam, and Nephi; and they stood as if they knew not whither they should go.

The reason why they could be unwilling to go is described above: This would represent an obstacle and even though they certainly would welcome the blessings they might not be willing to pay the price that was coming with them.

If my memory serves me right..when Nephi explains this after he has the same vision (Chapter 11) we see it from his eyes and come away with more of an understanding of what the vision represents. As others have said; will be interesting when we get to Chapter 11.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You mentioned the three lower levels of the soul. Would you be willing to explain this concept a little bit? How many levels are there? What are their significance?

:)

Certainly. Judaism believes there are five levels to the soul. I am actually using the word soul rather loosely here because in the Bible a soul is a combination of a spirit with a body. There are not enough or even accurate enough words in the English language to describe the Israelite concept of soul and spirit so the translations are rather loose. Anyway here it is

Nefesh ("soul") - This is the level of our instincts. This is what connects the soul to the body.

Ruach ("wind") - This refers to our emotions.

Neshamah ("breath") - This refers to our mind

Chayah ("life") - This refers roughly to our spirituality and is concealed in the Neshamah. This is what makes us perceive that there is a spiritual reality that transcends our mind and emotions.

Yehidah ("uniqueness") - This refers to the spark of G-d that lives within you. It is associated with the Shechinah and is the part that is responsible for making you become one with G-d if you choose to unite with Him.

This is a basic summary of the five leves of the soul. So you see when we refer to the first three leves we are talking about the non-spiritual reality of the human being. And this is exactly where G-d's laws make themselves manifest. The upper levels of the soul would be capable of directly perceiving that which emanates from G-d. But because the lower levels are not capable of that then the commandments of G-d have to take a more tangible form. The lower levels need something more concrete like "do this" or "don't do that" because without such a form they cannot grasp G-d.

b'shalom!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

soul is a combination of a spirit with a body

I am curious on this. LDS have no official stance or doctrine on when a soul enters the body. Whether it be at conception or when the first breath is taken by an infant. As far as those of Jewish faith, when do you believe that the spirit enters the body to create the soul?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yehidah ("uniqueness") - This refers to the spark of G-d that lives within you. It is associated with the Shechinah and is the part that is responsible for making you become one with G-d if you choose to unite with Him.

This struck me as similar to our concept of the light of Christ, sometimes called Spirit of Christ, the light of truth, spirit of truth, truth, light, intelligence or just Spirit in our scriptures. (I might have missed a few more) It is in all people and one of the manifestations of this light, is conscience. We believe that if heeded, we can increase in this light and it will lead us to truth and ultimately to be united with God in oneness.

And the Spirit giveth light to every man that cometh into the world; and the Spirit enlighteneth every man through the world, that hearkeneth to the voice of the Spirit. And every one that hearkeneth to the voice of the Spirit cometh unto God, even the Father. (D&C 84:46-47)

That which is of God is light; and he that receiveth light, and continueth in God, receiveth more light; and that light groweth brighter and brighter until the perfect day. (D&C 50:24)

It is not to be confused with the Holy Ghost, who in Mormonism is an actual Spirit person and a member of the Godhead.

Regards,

Vanhin

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certainly. Judaism believes there are five levels to the soul. I am actually using the word soul rather loosely here because in the Bible a soul is a combination of a spirit with a body. There are not enough or even accurate enough words in the English language to describe the Israelite concept of soul and spirit so the translations are rather loose. Anyway here it is

Nefesh ("soul") - This is the level of our instincts. This is what connects the soul to the body.

Ruach ("wind") - This refers to our emotions.

Neshamah ("breath") - This refers to our mind

Chayah ("life") - This refers roughly to our spirituality and is concealed in the Neshamah. This is what makes us perceive that there is a spiritual reality that transcends our mind and emotions.

Yehidah ("uniqueness") - This refers to the spark of G-d that lives within you. It is associated with the Shechinah and is the part that is responsible for making you become one with G-d if you choose to unite with Him.

This is a basic summary of the five leves of the soul. So you see when we refer to the first three leves we are talking about the non-spiritual reality of the human being. And this is exactly where G-d's laws make themselves manifest. The upper levels of the soul would be capable of directly perceiving that which emanates from G-d. But because the lower levels are not capable of that then the commandments of G-d have to take a more tangible form. The lower levels need something more concrete like "do this" or "don't do that" because without such a form they cannot grasp G-d.

b'shalom!

Pam already said about the seeds.

The 5 and their explanation reminds me of the 3 kingdoms of glory, we believe people will enherit at resaurection in the Judgement day. When 5 maybe it would be: Outer darkness for those doomed ones (not that many) Telestial, for those with "starshine", Terrestrial for those, who been good people "moon shine" and Selestial for those with "Suns shine", then the highest possible would be to become what we are seeds of.

A Kittel, white garments... interesting we got something similar.... We also are burried in them. Btw is there any special toght about burning the dead?

Etrog... hmm dont look THAT good to me...:D

The river was before to me just a fysical obstacle... now a lot more!

Laman and Lemuel were greedy... me thinks. They did nto want to leave the gold of their father but take it with.

Good night!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...