Vanhin

Manner of Prophesying Among the Jews

Recommended Posts

Concerning the words of Isaiah, Nephi admits that his people (the Nephites) were not well versed in the "manner of prophesying among the Jews", and that many of the prophesies (especially the words of Isaiah) were difficult for people to understand unless they were taught this "manner of prophesying" (2 Ne. 25:1-6). Nephi wrote:

Yea, and my soul delighteth in the words of Isaiah, for I came out from Jerusalem, and mine eyes hath beheld the things of the Jews, and I know that the Jews do understand the things of the prophets, and there is none other people that understand the things which were spoken unto the Jews like unto them, save it be that they are taught after the manner of the things of the Jews. (2 Ne. 25:5)

I think this is partly why I am so fond of this forum, and the hours that thekabalist has devoted to his commentary here. I see this as an opportunity for us to increase our understanding about the manner of prophesying among the Jews, while we can. I think I speak for most visitors of this forum in expressing my heartfelt gratitude for his contributions.

Sincerely,

Vanhin

Edited by Vanhin
I kept writing "thread" when I meant "forum"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel every new chapter, verse that thekabalist is explaining to us is like a spiritual trip in the world of Nephi, with a good guide. I hope we wont be left in the deseret.... and there are other books too like DC and ... the Book of Abraham should be extra special I heard a Jewish person say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well along this line of thought, let me ask thekabalist a question. Would the kind of understanding you are applying to these readings of the Book of Mormon be something that less diligent members of the Jewish community have problems understanding?

For example, in chapter 9 you discuss the word plates, which can be understood as calender, being used 12 times and that would have an underlying significance. Is it possible that this sort of understanding of scripture would be beyond Laman and Lemuel?

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ran

Yes it is possible. Because the level of involvement with Judaism itself has always been a matter of personal choice. In ancient times people would gather at the city gates and at the synagogues to hear and study the law. Those who wished could have a very deep education in the Scriptures and those who cared little for it could get by with the minimum. It is still this way to this day in Judaism. You have families in which some are Torah scholars and others can barely recite the prayer book. So it's possible that Laman and Lemuel cared so little for the things of G-d that they lacked the deep education that Nephi clearly displays.

b'shalom!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, thank you, thank you thekabalist.

You are enriching our lives and appreciation for this book we love by sharing your insights and we are so enjoying this rare opportunity. Thank you for all your time and effort.

Please continue.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, is thekabalist coming back? What do you think?

I believe he will. But I think the comment is really "emptying his jacket" and he needs to have some pauses. Even doing the translation is very exhausting and if he has the spirit with him, as it looks like to me, it is very consuming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Concerning the words of Isaiah, Nephi admits that his people (the Nephites) were not well versed in the "manner of prophesying among the Jews", and that many of the prophesies (especially the words of Isaiah) were difficult for people to understand unless they were taught this "manner of prophesying" (2 Ne. 25:1-6). Nephi wrote:

Yea, and my soul delighteth in the words of Isaiah, for I came out from Jerusalem, and mine eyes hath beheld the things of the Jews, and I know that the Jews do understand the things of the prophets, and there is none other people that understand the things which were spoken unto the Jews like unto them, save it be that they are taught after the manner of the things of the Jews. (2 Ne. 25:5)

I think this is partly why I am so fond of this forum, and the hours that thekabalist has devoted to his commentary here. I see this as an opportunity for us to increase our understanding about the manner of prophesying among the Jews, while we can. I think I speak for most visitors of this forum in expressing my heartfelt gratitude for his contributions.

Sincerely,

Vanhin

Hi there - I'm also Jewish and very involved in the study of Kabbalah. My sister has embraced the Mormon Faith so I'm interested in better understanding its precepts.

I've posted here because I've spent the last few days posting quite a bit about Isaiah in relationship to some terraformed images I've found in the Arizona area that speak to Isaiah 11:6. I would be very interested in getting some perspective from thekabalist on this as well as others who have knowledge concerning the emergence of Zion here in the United States. You can view this at Isaiah's Vision

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/19/2009 at 12:22 PM, Vanhin said:

Concerning the words of Isaiah, Nephi admits that his people (the Nephites) were not well versed in the "manner of prophesying among the Jews", and that many of the prophesies (especially the words of Isaiah) were difficult for people to understand unless they were taught this "manner of prophesying" (2 Ne. 25:1-6). Nephi wrote:

 

Yea, and my soul delighteth in the words of Isaiah, for I came out from Jerusalem, and mine eyes hath beheld the things of the Jews, and I know that the Jews do understand the things of the prophets, and there is none other people that understand the things which were spoken unto the Jews like unto them, save it be that they are taught after the manner of the things of the Jews. (2 Ne. 25:5)

I think this is partly why I am so fond of this forum, and the hours that thekabalist has devoted to his commentary here. I see this as an opportunity for us to increase our understanding about the manner of prophesying among the Jews, while we can. I think I speak for most visitors of this forum in expressing my heartfelt gratitude for his contributions.

Sincerely,

Vanhin

In Judaism, prophets are not seen as predicting the future. Their role is speaking truth to power, particularly the ruler. They are the check and balance against corruption and sin, by making it public and holding them accountable to HaShem for their actions. Sin has consequences, as we see going back to the Song of Moses in Deuteronomy, and continuing on. But those are potentialities, not predictions, for teshuva by the ruler and the people can alter those consequences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/14/2018 at 8:20 PM, cathyyg said:

In Judaism, prophets are not seen as predicting the future. Their role is speaking truth to power, particularly the ruler. They are the check and balance against corruption and sin, by making it public and holding them accountable to HaShem for their actions. Sin has consequences, as we see going back to the Song of Moses in Deuteronomy, and continuing on. But those are potentialities, not predictions, for teshuva by the ruler and the people can alter those consequences.

This is an impressive answer that sure reminds me of:

I personally can see no significant error in the ideas in this section?????

https://www.near-death.com/science/research/future.html#a03

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now