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prisonchaplain

Did Glen Beck "step in it?"

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When I read an article from Time Mag I feel like its always slanted....imagine that...Time Mag being objective....:eek:

C'mon Pale.....Time isn't bias!! I mean....President Obama was ONLY on the cover 13 times in a year. Sound fair to me......:eek::rolleyes:

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"I beg you, look for the words 'social justice' or 'economic justice' on your church Web site. If you find it, run as fast as you can. Social justice and economic justice, they are code words."

"Am I advising people to leave their church? Yes! If I am going to Jeremiah Wright's church (a reference to President Barack Obama's former Chicago pastor). If you have a priest that is pushing social justice, go find another parish. Go alert your bishop." - Glenn Beck

LDS.org - Ensign Article - A Message to My Granddaughters: Becoming Great Women

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Context is everything.......;) Not defending Brother Beck. But, I think he was referencing extremeness like the Reverend (so-called) Wright.

I know. I didn't read the talk I linked to, I just know that it contains the phrase. I'm just pointing out Beck's extremism. :)

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What about the churches that support conservative agendas? Should they be abandoned as well? Personally, I say yes (and I agree that liberal politics have no place in a church either, btw). But I'm not going to hold my breath waiting for Beck to say so.

You are consistent, and so am I. You say churches should not address social or political issues, and I say that to a certain extent they can. And the same standard applies to both political wings.

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Fair or not, Glen Beck is seen by some as a "conservative Mormon commentator." He may not be an official voice, but then again, most non-LDS aren't looking for such a seal of approval. So, to the question. As Beck himself has admitted, LDS doctrine is different from that of "traditional Christianity." He says that appeals to him, but he's most happy that millions are satisfied by the traditional teachings. Let's just be open-minded and tolerant of each other.

And then, on March 2nd, he encourages his audience, so many of whom are traditional Christians, to exit their "social justice churches." Even if I agreed with him, he's not the person to deliver that message. He wants traditional folk to accept him and his differences, even if they disagree. Let's see the good in each other, and agree to disagree on the rest. And then, he tells a segment of traditional Christians to abandon their houses of worship. In discussing this with friends, they suggested that this little episode will likey damage Mitt Romney, more than anything. Thoughts?

Glen Beck is first and foremost a Libertarian. Libertarians believe that social justivce is best achieved by a lessez-faire attitude that leaves social activism in the dustbin of history. I would not take his comments as anti-religion per se, but as an anti-liberal rant. Some Catholics and Protestant denominations are very liberal and activist in their beliefs, and try to influence policy in the US by force of political numbers and activism.

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Chaplain, do you ever find Assemblies of God being associated in peoples minds as synonymous with right-wing political maneuvering?

The thing is, Moksha that PC wasn't asking 'Is this fair?' or 'Do you agree with this', but 'Will people tar all LDS members with the same brush when they disagree with Glenn Beck?'

I think the answer to that is 'Yes'. And it isn't just a religious thing; It's a human thing.

On this very website, I parodied an argument someone made on here 'Can you believe those liberals condone...' when they were talking about a specific liberal. I made a posting about how 'Conservatives condone blowing up government buildings and killing children. Timothy McVeigh, a staunch Conservative...'

We tend to dehumanize our opponents, take the worst of what any one of them did, and tar the whole group with the same brush. Christians do it. Atheists do it. Specific denominations do it. There are people who think all Christians act like the Westboro Baptist church. There are religious people who think there is a 'Gay agenda' to destroy religion.

So, yes: I think this will be used as a weapon. Do I think it will matter? No. The people who would use this excuse would have hated the church to begin with.

In fact, those who agree with his view may even start investigating the church. I think it'll end up being a wash.

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He has a chapter in one of his books..."Why I am a Mormon". It's a fantastic story...belittle if you will.

I should note that I am not a Beck fan....I find him irritating...way to doom and gloom. But, I did find his story as portrayed in his book about how he came to the Gospel fascinating and touching.

Ya'll have no sense of humor :)

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I think people, including Beck and many on this thread, are over-reaching. Glenn Beck wants people to flee extreme liberal churches. Not a bad thing, IMNSHO. However, he said it in a way that can easily be taken out of context (and is). Rather than using wisdom and a little nuance to check out ALL of Glenn Beck's ideas, and see whether most make sense or not, it becomes way too easy to take one or two of his rants and blow them out of proportion. He does not equate to a couple of rants. Let's place things into proper context, shall we?

Barak Obama does not equal Health Care (although the media would have us think so). Yet it is a component of who he is.

The Bible does not equate to Moses wiping out entire cities of women and children. Yet that is a component of the Bible. Nor is the Book of Mormon about decapitating drunk and defenseless men.

Beck has done some great things: he started the 9/12 groups that led to the Tea Parties. Regardless of whether one is R or D, the parties have kick started many people into getting involved in politics and government. Beck has sounded the alarm on people like Van Jones, a self-proclaimed communist. Beck has helped steer much of the discussion on issues like big spending (both from Bush and Obama), health care, ensuring government stays "of the people, for the people, and by the people." Those aren't bad things. And they only seem radical, because they go against the DC climate.

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Chaplain, do you ever find Assemblies of God being associated in peoples minds as synonymous with right-wing political maneuvering?

Yes. James Watt & John Ashcroft both raised that spectre. More recently, Sarah Palin, who was, for a time, attending Waseca AG.

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To give some perspective--since I started the the thread--the title of the thread should have hinted at the severity I assign to Beck's error here. He "stepped in it." He got carried away and suggested something that uniquely didn't work for him. He looked a bit hypocritical, and quite foolish. He offended people who don't like him anyway, and left some of us who do scratching our heads.

That his website explains what he said suggests that his handlers know this, and are doing some minor damage repair. This is not a major, long-term problem. Beck will remain a multi-millionaire, and retain a large audience. But, yes--he stepped in it.

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I wonder (and PC, please feel free to provide perspective here) if we Mormons find this more revolting than most non-Mormons would.

As Mormons, we believe our church is the Kingdom of God on the earth--and is the only institution that may be appropriately so labeled. The idea that we should walk away from it because of political differences shocks even our most liberal members.

Are Beck's remarks really quite so offensive to an Episcopalian who believes that his own church can be a fount of salvation--but that so can the Lutherans, the Baptists, the Methodists, or the Presbyterians?

I have non-LDS relatives who transition through various Protestant sects quite easily depending on location, social connections, and the speaking talents of the pastor; and I'm just wondering whether this is a common trait within Protestantism.

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JAG, you've hit on a difference that is profound here. My guess is that Catholics my track with your line of thought. Beck, imho, was catering (pandering?) to conservative evangelicals, who, for over 100 years, have harbored the belief that liberal denominations have lost almost any sense of spiritual gospel, and have, instead given themselves over to liberal politics in religious dress. In the late 19th and early 20th century fundamentalists decried the social gospel of the modernist churches.

Beck played on that history, and probably expected more than a few "amens" from his most loyal supporters. He also might have hoped that those LDS who are his fans, might secretly hope some would depart their churches, and join yours.

IMHO, Jim Wallis, the liberal "social justice Christian," who's taken Beck's statements and run with them, calling for a Christian boycott of him, is very likely playing on evangelical distrust of LDS. Just who is this Mormon telling Christians to leave their churches, anyway?

Ironically, both Beck and Wallis are likely to gain supporters through this little controversy.

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That his website explains what he said suggests that his handlers know this, and are doing some minor damage repair.

Hopefully his handlers were asking pertinent questions like, "Do you think many people actually saw Mr. Beck bite the head off the rat?", rather than more fault finding questions such as, "Who is responsible for letting him out of the cage?".

IMHO, Jim Wallis, the liberal "social justice Christian," who's taken Beck's statements and run with them, calling for a Christian boycott of him, is very likely playing on evangelical distrust of LDS. Just who is this Mormon telling Christians to leave their churches, anyway?

Those who have it in for Mormons have always been conservative religionists. So whats new? Glenn Beck on the other hand seems intent on widening the bleachers to fit religionists of all stripes.

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Those who have it in for Mormons have always been conservative religionists.

are you sure about this??????

Come on Pale, you know Proposition 8 drew no liberal ire.

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Fair or not, Glen Beck is seen by some as a "conservative Mormon commentator." He may not be an official voice, but then again, most non-LDS aren't looking for such a seal of approval. So, to the question. As Beck himself has admitted, LDS doctrine is different from that of "traditional Christianity." He says that appeals to him, but he's most happy that millions are satisfied by the traditional teachings. Let's just be open-minded and tolerant of each other.

And then, on March 2nd, he encourages his audience, so many of whom are traditional Christians, to exit their "social justice churches." Even if I agreed with him, he's not the person to deliver that message. He wants traditional folk to accept him and his differences, even if they disagree. Let's see the good in each other, and agree to disagree on the rest. And then, he tells a segment of traditional Christians to abandon their houses of worship. In discussing this with friends, they suggested that this little episode will likey damage Mitt Romney, more than anything. Thoughts?

Glenn beck is another rush limbaugh; he will say anything to get his ratings and paycheck.:mellow:

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PC, In the 60s/70s, the Roman Catholics had a major issue with priests and nuns replacing the gospel of Christ with political leftist activism. Malachi Martin, a former Jesuit priest (still active Catholic) wrote several books on it. One he wrote on the Jesuits showed how they used to be a very diligent group that promoted Christ through good works and education.

But Jesuit priests were involved in the communist overthrow of Nicaragua in the 70s/80s. Martin describes how Pope John Paul II went to Nicaragua to preach to the people. Only one priest showed up at the airport to meet him, and the Pope chewed him out for their leaving the gospel for communism. At a rally, instead of a giant cross behind him, which was the tradition, the communists placed a sign saying that the Pope supported the revolution. Then, as he denounced what was going on, they had people drown him out.

He went throughout the Catholic Church trying to root out the pro-leftist activists, as he knew fully well how communism had affected his country of Poland. Along with Poland's Solidarity Union, Maggie Thatcher, and Ronald Reagan, John Paul II brought down the Iron Curtain.

If this is what Glenn Beck had in mind when he warned about social activism in churches, then he is in good company with the best Pope the Catholic church had in centuries.

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