New Converts: Title and Attrition rate?


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After you are baptized, what do they call you? I understand the established members of the church are called "Elders." Those who are considering joining the church are called Investigators. But what are new converts called? How long after joining do you begin to become involved, as in getting assignments, requests to do things, missionary work, and such things? How do they decide what they think you would be best at and place you? How long before you are considered an Elder and someone of value in the church as opposed to just someone filling the seats on Sunday?

More importantly, how often do newly baptized members slide back into the obscurity of their secular lives, back into their old habits, and become distant from the Church? How does the Church react to these people? Is there a section of the church who's duty it is to seek out the wayward or non-devoted members and try to bring them back in? And if they can't... can the Church punish you? Do they ever kick someone out for not living up to their baptismal promises?

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You will be called "Brother" in the family of Christ - and that is the BEST title of all - well, other than Sister, but you don't qualify. :)

I am also called "brother"... even though I am an Elder in the Melchezidek Priesthood, I'm not referred to by name as "Elder". Those that we call "Elder" in the church by their name are full-time male missionaries and General Authorities who are called and set apart in their respective priesthood office and calling.

Only An Elder - Bruce R. McConkie

I would hope that you would be extended a calling/assignment your very first week!

Typically, you will be ordained to the office of a Priest within the Aaronic Priesthood within a week of your baptism. This is the lesser or preparatory priesthood to help prepare you for the Melchezidek or higher priesthood after a few months. Ideally, you'll be attending the temple to make sacred covenants there after a year of membership!

As far as retention: retention is a two way street. We do what we can as a church & ward, but it's up to those who have chosen to fall away to heed that spirit. That's a part of the home teaching program of the Church and part of the Oath and Covenant of the Priesthood. It's unfortunate, but so many people get distracted by whatever it is in their lives... and it's easy to continue to be distracted and lose sight of what is really important.

The Church isn't a disciplinarian. Even excommunication is the last resort, but it does happen, particularly with those who are unrepentant.

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Do the assignments vary? What kinds of things could I expect to be "assigned."

I don't really want to be oiling down wood pews or washing stained glass windows. :(

Someone was telling me that most new converts end up getting bossed around to do a bunch of crummy work, nothing to do with the Lord which is why I asked. Things like mowing the lawn of the temple, cleaning bathrooms and fetching things for the missionaries? How much truth is there to this?

I don't mind being of use and service, I really desperately want to be a part of something spiritual and positive... a family. But I don't want to just be a bottom rung free labor either...

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There aren't any callings that are that sort of labor, typically. We do clean our own buildings, and usually someone has a calling to coordinate that, but families are supposed to take turns helping. Mowing the lawn at the temple would be done by the temple landscaper, which is a paid, full-time position that you would apply for like any other job. Fetching things for missionaries? I can only imagine someone doing that voluntarily. It's certainly not a calling. Depending on where you live, there are assignments to work in the church cannery or orchard or the like (for our welfare program) but again, those are volunteer assignments, usually coordinated by someone with the calling to coordinate them.

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Assignments do vary. And EVERY calling has an important function and lesson for us to learn.

I know of new converts who are called to be ward missionaries - who assist with teaching new member discussions and fellowshipping investigators - to guide them and be a friend. And yes, sometimes it takes an assignment to be a friend to really become friends.

Others have been called to be greeters and ushers for our weekly sacrament services.

One I know was called to lead the choir! (He had a little experience doing that before and it was really good!)

There are many various callings, and one aspect we are taught is not to 'aspire' to callings. There is always a job that needs to be done, and the real question is: Are we willing?

The Bishop may be released and called to be in the nursery. If that's where he is needed, will he accept the call to serve?

Oh, we all get to help with building clean-up and maintenance of our church buildings. It's typically organized through the priesthood quorums to do it once a week - usually on a Saturday morning. (My tip is to keep some fabreeze and get a trash can with a lid for the Mother's lounge. You'd hope that someone would take care of dirty diapers, but they usually end up sitting there all week.) Sorry, that's probably TMI... but it's not all a bed of roses in Zion! :D

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Do the assignments vary? What kinds of things could I expect to be "assigned."

I don't really want to be oiling down wood pews or washing stained glass windows. :(

Someone was telling me that most new converts end up getting bossed around to do a bunch of crummy work, nothing to do with the Lord which is why I asked. Things like mowing the lawn of the temple, cleaning bathrooms and fetching things for the missionaries? How much truth is there to this?

I don't mind being of use and service, I really desperately want to be a part of something spiritual and positive... a family. But I don't want to just be a bottom rung free labor either...

Not sure who told you that, but they were either pulling your leg or they had no idea what they were talking about. A "calling" is a duty in the Church you are asked to perform. It can range from greeting people as they enter the Sunday services or looking after hymnbooks to being the bishop of the ward or running all of the Young Men's activities. Unless your bishop is completely on top of things, it's unlikely you'll have a calling the same week you're baptized, but hopefully you'll have one within a couple of months.

As for "bottom rung free labor": I have been a member of the Church my entire life, almost 50 years, and I still go in to clean the meetinghouse and scrub toilets when our ward's turn comes up to clean the building. The whole "status" ideal that the rest of the world uses does not apply at Church.

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Not sure who told you that, but they were either pulling your leg or they had no idea what they were talking about. A "calling" is a duty in the Church you are asked to perform. It can range from greeting people as they enter the Sunday services or looking after hymnbooks to being the bishop of the ward or running all of the Young Men's activities. Unless your bishop is completely on top of things, it's unlikely you'll have a calling the same week you're baptized, but hopefully you'll have one within a couple of months.

As for "bottom rung free labor": I have been a member of the Church my entire life, almost 50 years, and I still go in to clean the meetinghouse and scrub toilets when our ward's turn comes up to clean the building. The whole "status" ideal that the rest of the world uses does not apply at Church.

Truth be told, I have never encountered the amount of... rumor and myth and fabrication, most of it negative, looking into something as much as I have ever since I became interested in the church. I mean, I have friends who are acting like I'm considering joining Al Qaeda or something the way they express concern. At best, most dismiss the LDS as folly and that I should seek my answers and purpose elsewhere. Others whisper in hushed tones to me like I just told them I'm investigating becoming a meth user.

For example, a coworker earlier today asked why I was skipping lunch. I explained I was fasting. This led to me having to explain WHY I was fasting. Because I was trying to gain better insight to help my faith as I read the Book of Mormon because a lot of it IS hard to comprehend and fit into my pantheon of life long Catholicism and other Christian influences. This person began to relay tales of how the Mormons in her country (She is from Mexico) sell cheese on street corners and beat their daughters in order to make them fear interactions with men and to keep them chaste. I rolled my eyes and tried to begin explaining what I've been learning, even going so far as to show her this site in an attempt to show her some of the things I've asked. I'm not a stupid person. In fact I hold a degree in biology and one in criminology, as well as specializing in microbiological sciences and an expertise with information technology systems. So I am quite comfortable with facts, not opinions. This is why I am so inquisitive on this site. I NEED to get answers and I have questions that I feel I have to ask... and it's the ONLY way to learn. But this person, she continued to dismiss it. Of course the response is, "They'll tell you anything to get you to join." We eventually just ended the discussion because I could see that she was frustrated simply by me defending the LDS church with the tiny knowledge I have so far gained! The worst part is, I"m not even a MEMBER. I'm not even certain I will EVER become one. NOt to hurt anyone's feelings or dash any high hopes, but I've never said I was going to join for certain. I have only been trying to learn what I can to give the LDS church a fair shake because I feel something indescribable about it that Catholicism, or Baptism, or even atheism just don't do for me. Something in me is telling me that if I'm going to fill this void in my life and heart the answers lie here... if not with the LDS church, in the least it's a start down a path that will LEAD to answers. But there's always the very good possibility I'll still say it is not for me.

So just as a disclaimer, I do not ever intend to offend with my questioning, that's not the kind of person I am, and you all have been so nice and kind I wouldn't dream of intentionally mocking or insulting you and what you believe. I only ask because I am ignorant. I do not know anything about your church beyond what I can read, google, and learn from members. So I thank you all sincerely for tolerating my ignorance and at times foolishness. But I know of no other way to learn.

....

Another thing, Vort you mentioned you were a member for 50 years. That made me think. Are people who converted, especially those who are considering late in life like me where unfortunately I can never have the experience of being a missionary because I'm past the age (28? or something like that? I'm 30). Does that mean I'll be thought of differently by the other members? I mean, is there benefits or status that (for lack of a better term) "Born-in" members (or life long ones) have over Converts?

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AFter being baptized you would generally be referred to as a 'new member'. Hopefully you will never be considered as someone just filling a seat. (Shudder)

Callings are determined by prayer. Assignments are given according to needs of the ward. Home teaching is an assignment that you will be helping with. You will be teamed with another brother to go and teach some families in their homes, you will also have home teachers assigned to you. Home teachers, obviously teach, invite the Spirit, and also make sure the needs of the family are being met.

Cleaning assignments are usually rotated around. Temple cleaning is voluntary, and is one of my favorite things...I have learned SO much about the temple while cleaning it. Temple grounds keeping at our temple is sometimes available to volunteers for spring or fall planting times, and they usually have more people sign up than they need. (IF you ever want to get to know somebody, clean their house)

Callings, well, there are all kinds. You can ask for a calling if you don't get one right away. My first calling was library assistant. It was extremely helpful because I learned about how to order church materials, the manuals, videos, etc., and I didn't have to miss any classes. I also got to know a lot of the members that way. There are family history workers that help people on computers, secretaries that keep schedules and records, clerks, counselors for different leaderships, employment specialists, oh just lots and lots of callings. I have never heard of anyone being called to assist the missionaries like that, my second calling was ward missionary, in which case I would help in the teaching by bearing my testimony and being friendly and inviting/informing investigators, new members, and re-activating members to activities.

With people who have been baptized, if there is someone that backslides it is usually treated as a kind of prodigal son situation...so glad to have you back, identify the reason of going inactive and try to remedy it from happening again. If you have recieved your temple endowments and the M. priesthood it is a much more serious thing, though as long as you are sincerely repentant that is the important thing. Really any time there is church discipline, the goal of it (as far as I have knowledge of) is 1. to provide help to that discpinee to return and 2. to protect the other members of the church.

Part of taking on His name and trying to be more like Him means that we help others. Callings organize us so that our efforts are the most effective, energy and resources are not wasted on a double effort, the needs of many are met, and it gives all of us an opportunity to learn more about the gospel through service.

Edited by jayanna
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Another thing, Vort you mentioned you were a member for 50 years. That made me think. Are people who converted, especially those who are considering late in life like me where unfortunately I can never have the experience of being a missionary because I'm past the age (28? or something like that? I'm 30). Does that mean I'll be thought of differently by the other members? I mean, is there benefits or status that (for lack of a better term) "Born-in" members (or life long ones) have over Converts?

I joined in my twenties, my hubby joined when he was 30. Most of the adults in my ward are adult converts, no noticeable difference at all. Actually all three members of our bishopric, and the stake president, and the general authority who spoke at our last stake conference are all converts. (Actually, technically we are ALL converts, but with the use of the word here I mean those who were not born with one or both parents as church members)

You can serve a mission when you retire. Such missions are called "Senior" missions. They have a bit more leeway with their service concerning where they go and use of their resources, like some can take their own cars, and recently I think some can serve missions from their own homes (like those genealogy Senior missionaries).

My hubby and I hope to someday go on a mission to Britian, or maybe Australia/New Zealand area someday.

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Truth be told, I have never encountered the amount of... rumor and myth and fabrication, most of it negative, looking into something as much as I have ever since I became interested in the church.

I am sorry, but not surprised, to hear this. You will always hear this. Those of us who have grown up in the Church have heard it since childhood. You never really get used to it, but after a while you learn to ignore it. Or the better people (better than me) learn to use such expressions as a gateway to conversation and teach people otherwise.

Another thing, Vort you mentioned you were a member for 50 years. That made me think. Are people who converted, especially those who are considering late in life like me where unfortunately I can never have the experience of being a missionary because I'm past the age (28? or something like that? I'm 30). Does that mean I'll be thought of differently by the other members? I mean, is there benefits or status that (for lack of a better term) "Born-in" members (or life long ones) have over Converts?

No, people don't have higher status or something like that from being born in the Church. As a new member, you will be treated with love and respect, and it will be assumed you don't know certain things, so people will try to teach you. After a couple of years, assuming you stay active and participate, you're just one of the ward members, a friend among a large group of friends, a brother.

Obviously, we think there must be some advantage to being raised Mormon, since we do raise our kids that way. But even that advantage is more along the lines of "they are more likely to stay out of trouble, become an integral part of our family, love their parents and siblings, and come to know God younger", not any idea that they are more valuable people than non-members. In fact, the kids are among the best at inviting their friends to come to Church with them.

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Even excommunication is the last resort, but it does happen, particularly with those who are unrepentant.

I'm curious, could one be excommunicated for becoming kind of less active? I'm thinking of someone who goes to services, but who doesn't do visiting teaching (and doesn't have health or other issues that would preclude doing so) or RS activities? Would one lose their recommend?

So, I'm thinking of people who don't want to be 'bothered' by all the other things that go along with being a member, but observe the WOW, tithe, and go to Sacrament meeting. What happens with people who are older? If I only go to services a few times a year due to health or lack of transportation, but I tithe, consider myself Mormon, etc., would I lose my recommend?

I think some of the obligations differ between men and women, so it gets confusing.

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I'm curious, could one be excommunicated for becoming kind of less active? I'm thinking of someone who goes to services, but who doesn't do visiting teaching (and doesn't have health or other issues that would preclude doing so) or RS activities? Would one lose their recommend?

So, I'm thinking of people who don't want to be 'bothered' by all the other things that go along with being a member, but observe the WOW, tithe, and go to Sacrament meeting. What happens with people who are older? If I only go to services a few times a year due to health or lack of transportation, but I tithe, consider myself Mormon, etc., would I lose my recommend?

I think some of the obligations differ between men and women, so it gets confusing.

No. Excommunication is for those who have utterly forsaken their covenants and refuse to repent, as well as for those who present a danger to their fellow Saints. The unrepentant adulterer will be excommunicated. The man who speaks out openly in defiance of Church authority and refuses to stop will be excommunicated. The child molester will be excommunicated.

But the person who lapses into inactivity, does not do his or her home/visiting teaching duty faithfully, and drifts off will be encouraged to come back and welcomed when s/he does.

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What about the unrepentant smoker? Or drinker? Or sex addict?

I'm not any of those things, but I know that they are very important issues that define LDS Faith.

I have never heard of anyone being excommunicated for smoking or drinking. Unrepentant fornication, especially adultery, is grounds for excommunication.

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One thing to understand is that excommunication is not primarily punitive in nature; that is, we don't excommunicate someone to punish them for bad things they did. Rather, excommunication is intended to help insure the safety of the Saints and help the sinner repent by (1) removing their covenants from them so that they are not violating those covenants and (2) giving them incentive to repent.

That's what I've been taught, anyway. Having never actually been party to an excommunication, I can only report my understanding.

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I have never heard of anyone being excommunicated for smoking or drinking. Unrepentant fornication, especially adultery, is grounds for excommunication.

I guess if they admitted to drinking, they would lose their recommend since they couldn't say they kept the WOW? Could they still take the Sacrament?

I know that not all LDS have a recommend, but it seems that in our ward, the people I see regularly on Sunday have recommends because I see them at the temple or hear them talk about going to the temple. I know I felt a bit of pressure (all self-imposed) to do what I needed to do to get the recommend so that I could go to the temple and fit in with the others. Yes, I know there are other reasons to go, I'm just saying that one's environment and peer pressure can also have an effect.

So, maybe in a ward where not everyone has a recommend, do you think there are people who go to Sacrament meeting on Sunday and have a beer on Saturday, since they won't get excommunicated for it and don't have a recommend to lose? Also, can you be a HT if you don't have a recommend?

In Utah, are there Mormons who say they are Mormon, but do what they want? Maybe we'd call them cultural Mormons - like one can be a 'cultural Jew' who self-identifies as Jewish, but never goes to synagogue.

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I guess if they admitted to drinking, they would lose their recommend since they couldn't say they kept the WOW? Could they still take the Sacrament?

I know that not all LDS have a recommend, but it seems that in our ward, the people I see regularly on Sunday have recommends because I see them at the temple or hear them talk about going to the temple. I know I felt a bit of pressure (all self-imposed) to do what I needed to do to get the recommend so that I could go to the temple and fit in with the others. Yes, I know there are other reasons to go, I'm just saying that one's environment and peer pressure can also have an effect.

So, maybe in a ward where not everyone has a recommend, do you think there are people who go to Sacrament meeting on Sunday and have a beer on Saturday, since they won't get excommunicated for it and don't have a recommend to lose? Also, can you be a HT if you don't have a recommend?

In Utah, are there Mormons who say they are Mormon, but do what they want? Maybe we'd call them cultural Mormons - like one can be a 'cultural Jew' who self-identifies as Jewish, but never goes to synagogue.

I actually had a question about this. I've encountered several other Mormons that I was shocked to discover were Mormon. A friend of a friend that I've been around at outings and parties revealed HE is a Mormon. I never knew it because he practically drinks everyone in our social group under the table, smokes like a freight train, and he's rather enviable in his legendary relations with women. When asked, he told me the REcommend and such is only necessary or desirable if you want to do a bunch of ceremonies or get married, but it's not something that Mormon's NEED to have.

But what Dahlia says intrigues me. Is there really a sort of cliquish mentality about Temple Recommends? Like if I converted, do I have to rush and get my temple recommend as quickly as possible so I can truly belong? How long would that take? A year? a Month?

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But what Dahlia says intrigues me. Is there really a sort of cliquish mentality about Temple Recommends? Like if I converted, do I have to rush and get my temple recommend as quickly as possible so I can truly belong? How long would that take? A year? a Month?

Prepare for the Blessings of the Temple - Ensign Oct. 2010 - ensign

A "cliquish mentality" suggests that temple worship is like being in a club.

The temple is available to all who are members of the church and are worthy to enter.

There is no stigma against anyone who does not have a current temple recommend. Only encouragement by ward & stake leadership to qualify for a temple recommend.

Something you can look forward to, are doing baptisms for the dead. You can do this before the one-year mark. You can be granted a "limited use" recommend - the same youth are granted - to have baptisms performed on behalf of the deceased.

This would be a GREAT blessing for you - to experience the spirit of the temple.

Gospel Principles Chapter 40: Temple Work and Family History

Temple recommend questions are outlined in this chapter:

Gospel Principles Chapter 38: Eternal Marriage

Before we can go to the temple, we must be active, worthy members of the Church for at least one year. Men must hold the Melchizedek Priesthood. We must be interviewed by the branch president or bishop. If he finds us worthy, he will give us a temple recommend. If we are not worthy, he will counsel with us and help us set goals to become worthy to go to the temple.

After we receive a recommend from our bishop or branch president, we must be interviewed by the stake president or the mission president. We are asked questions like the following in interviews for a temple recommend:

  • Do you have faith in and a testimony of God, the Eternal Father; His Son, Jesus Christ; and the Holy Ghost? Do you have a firm testimony of the restored gospel?
  • Do you sustain the President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints as the prophet, seer, and revelator? Do you recognize him as the only person on earth authorized to exercise all priesthood keys?
  • Do you live the law of chastity?
  • Are you a full-tithe payer?
  • Do you keep the Word of Wisdom?
  • Are you honest in your dealings with others?
  • Do you strive to keep the covenants you have made, to attend your sacrament and priesthood meetings, and to keep your life in harmony with the laws and commandments of the gospel?
When you ask for a temple recommend, you should remember that entering the temple is a sacred privilege. It is a serious act, not something to be taken lightly.

We must seek earnestly to obey every covenant that we make in the temple. The Lord has said that if we are true and faithful, we will enter into our exaltation. We will become like our Heavenly Father. (See D&C 132:19–20.) Temple marriage is worth any sacrifice. It is a way of obtaining eternal blessings beyond measure.

Edited by skippy740
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I really want to make clear that I don't see a 'cliquish mentality' among my ward members. I just noticed that everyone I know has a recommend and goes to the temple as often as they can, even though it's 2 hours away. Also, most have children and have to either get a sitter or take turns to go. It can be something of a sacrifice to go to the temple. Yet they go.

It was that behavior that impressed me and made me feel that it would be a good thing for me to be worthy enough to get a recommend. Again, these are my internal feelings, nothing that was forced on me. Of course, we frequently hear in General Conference, etc. that we should become temple worthy, so there's that.

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But one doesn't need to BE temple worthy to be a valued member of the ward right? What's different about the Temple that you can't get at the meeting house, other than a few special ceremonies?

It still sounds like "VIP" status to me... Where people get it just so they won't be the only one without it?

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But one doesn't need to BE temple worthy to be a valued member of the ward right?

No. One can be a valued member of the ward without being temple-worthy, but why would you limit yourself?

Why would you choose to accept anything less than everything God wants for you?

Why would you choose to refuse a gift that Christ offers you freely?

What's different about the Temple that you can't get at the meeting house, other than a few special ceremonies?

A greater enlightenment and understanding of the eternities, for starters.

The Temple is the House of the Lord.

Can you truly and deeply love a member of your family, yet refuse to visit them in their home?

Certainly- but why would you?

The bottom line is that it is a privelege and a commandment to enter the Temple, to make and keep sacred covenants. It is an opportunity to leave behind worldly cares and the weight and oppression of Babylon.

It is an opportunity to attend the Spirit of the Lord, to wait in his presence, without the noise and distraction that the fallen world generates in such abundance.

Given all that you gain- why would you refuse the offered blessing?

It still sounds like "VIP" status to me... Where people get it just so they won't be the only one without it?

Your perception is incorrect.

It is not a "status" thing- since no one (save perhaps the Bishop) actually knows who is or is not temple worthy.

There is no rank or status within the Church. I am an Elder, just as is President Monson. Elder Packer (as an apostle) is no more beloved of the Lord than I as a lowly member, nor than the newest convert still wet from the baptismal font.

We do not wear stripes on our sleeves, nor bedeck our clothes with ribbons indicating what degree of exaltation we have "earned".

We simply go to honor, worship, and obey the Lord.

Anything less is to deliberately place obstacles between ourselves and our God- and who would do that?

I also find it deeply amusing that you are willing to throw out this sort of blanket aspersion on an entire people- without troubling to know the people whom you are accusing.

Is this sort of unsupported mind-reading something you engage in often?

Or is it merely reserved for people who embrace concepts you don't understand?

Edited by selek
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No. One can be a valued member of the ward without being temple-worthy, but why would you limit yourself?

Why would you choose to accept anything less than everything God wants for you?

Why would you choose to refuse a gift that Christ offers you freely?

A greater enlightenment and understanding of the eternities, for starters.

The Temple is the House of the Lord.

Can you truly and deeply love a member of your family, yet refuse to visit them in their home?

Certainly- but why would you?

The bottom line is that it is a privelege and a commandment to enter the Temple, to make and keep sacred covenants. It is an opportunity to leave behind worldly cares and the weight and oppression of Babylon.

It is an opportunity to attend the Spirit of the Lord, to wait in his presence, without the noise and distraction that the fallen world generates in such abundance.

Given all that you gain- why would you refuse the offered blessing?

Your perception is incorrect.

It is not a "status" thing- since no one (save perhaps the Bishop) actually knows who is or is not temple worthy.

There is no rank or status within the Church. I am an Elder, just as is President Monson. Elder Packer (as an apostle) is no more beloved of the Lord than I as a lowly member, nor than the newest convert still wet from the baptismal font.

We do not wear stripes on our sleeves, nor bedeck our clothes with ribbons indicating what degree of exaltation we have "earned".

We simply go to honor, worship, and obey the Lord.

Anything less is to deliberately place obstacles between ourselves and our God- and who would do that?

This makes a great deal of sense. Thank you fpr putting it into those terms. I think I have a better understanding now.

I also find it deeply amusing that you are willing to throw out this sort of blanket aspersion on an entire people- without troubling to know the people whom you are accusing.

Is this sort of unsupported mind-reading something you engage in often?

Or is it merely reserved for people who embrace concepts you don't understand?

I'm sorry. I feel I've offended you. That was not my intention. I may have erred in how I made the statement, but I only did so truly out of ignorance and a desire to be corrected on things I do not have the clarity or benefit of experience with.

In the future, I'll be more sensitive in my lines of inquiry.

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What's different about the Temple that you can't get at the meeting house, other than a few special ceremonies?

Chalking up the learning, spirit, and ordinances that occurrs in the Temple of the Lord as 'a few special ceremonies' is kinda like describing the Atonement as, "That thing that Christ guy did." or if you prefer, baptism as, "That thing they do where they get you wet." It's understandable that you don't have an understanding of what occurs in the Temple and their importance, but the ordinances that occur there are sacred, powerful, instructive, and filled with the power and authority of God.

It still sounds like "VIP" status to me... Where people get it just so they won't be the only one without it?

Keep in mind some of the people you are talking to hold temple recommends and we hold them so that we can partake of the blessings of the temple. When you describe the temple and temple recommends as some VIP club that people are joining because they want to be one of the cool kids consider what that implies about our motivations for entering the temple.

Maybe an analogy will help. Consider if in response to you telling someone the basics of your being Christian and mentioning that the faith of those around you motivates you to strengthen your own they suggested, "Eh, sounds like you just want to be one of the cool kids." Now they've taken your faith in Christ and discounted it as simply wanting to run with the cool people. I'm not trying to chastise you, just provide some additional insight why your comments may be rubbing people the wrong way.

Edited by Dravin
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