What's the last book you read?


Connie
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The Eisenhorn trilogy. Now I'm halfway through the Ravenor trilogy. Sci-fi based on Warhammer 40K, specifically about the Inquistion. Good stories, I've read them several times before and am re-reading them as the final triology book 1 was recently released. All by Dan Abnett.

Imagine the spanish inquisition 40000 years in the future. That's the closest I can offer to those unfamiliar with 40K.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So i finished reading Perelandra by C.S. Lewis the other day. This is the 2nd book of his space trilogy which i have found so far to be really weird. I'm not sure i care to finish the series. As is typical of Lewis, he uses a lot of Christian symbolism in these books. The story so far is based on his understanding of the nature of God and man, which as an Anglican is pretty different from the LDS understanding.

Anyone else read these? If so, what did you think?

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Guest LiterateParakeet

So i finished reading Perelandra by C.S. Lewis the other day. This is the 2nd book of his space trilogy which i have found so far to be really weird. . .

Anyone else read these? If so, what did you think?

Since I love C.S. Lewis, as many of us do, I tried to read the space trilogy, but yeah...like you I found it pretty weird. I didn't even make it through the first one. You have more staying power than me. ;)

My favorite is Till We Have Faces. Have you read that one? It is a retelling of the Cupid and Psyche myth, but like all his books, it has Christian themes. It's wonderful.

One of my my favorite lines...the main character Orual is told that she will now be judged by the Gods and she says, (paraphrased), "I know I cannot hope for justice."

Her mentor says, ". . .one thing you may be sure is that you will not receive justice."

Orual asks, "Are the Gods not just then?"

Her mentor responds, "Oh no, my child, where would we be if they were?"

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Guest LiterateParakeet

LiterateParakeet,

I have to say that Till We Have Faces is my favorite C.S. Lewis but I have found few people that have read it. It definitely has a different tone then many of his other books and the symbolism is more subtle.

Same here. I wish more people had read it, I would love to talk about it.

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So i was at the library a couple days ago and thought i'd look at the Wheel of Time books since they have been mentioned several times here, and Dude!.. those are some really thick books!

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Same here. I wish more people had read it, I would love to talk about it.

Looks like there's a handful of other people on that other thread who have. Why not post something to that discussion. If you don't know where to start, I listed a bunch of themes I saw in the book that would be of interest to me. Feel free to pick on and post your thoughts.

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So i finished reading Perelandra by C.S. Lewis the other day. This is the 2nd book of his space trilogy which i have found so far to be really weird. I'm not sure i care to finish the series. As is typical of Lewis, he uses a lot of Christian symbolism in these books. The story so far is based on his understanding of the nature of God and man, which as an Anglican is pretty different from the LDS understanding.

Anyone else read these? If so, what did you think?

I own most of his works. I even own the Space Trilogy. Most of his writing I find harmonious with my own beliefs. However, this series was not what I would have expected from C.S. Lewis. The first book wasn't so bad. The second book bothered me. The third book was not worth reading. Not that his writing was bad, it just did not strike a cord with much of what I knew to be true. It also did not strike a cord with what I thought I knew about C.S. Lewis. Still, he is one of my favorite authors. ^_^

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The God Who Weeps: How Mormonism Makes Sense of Life by Terryl and Fiona Givens is the last book I read.

This book manages to explore the basic principals of LDS theology in a way that is both deeply rational and deeply spiritual. The basic goal of the work is to demonstrate that Mormonism is rational. I feel that the authors achieved what they set out to achieve, not only in style, but with a humility and charity which is so frequently lacking in discussions of a religious nature. I cannot recommend this book enough.

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Finally got around to reading Education of a Wandering Man by Louis L'Amour. This book is a memoir of some of his educational and life experiences. It was a bit rambling at times but overall very interesting. It gives a good idea of who he was and how he received his education. I had no idea that he did not go to college and never even finished high school. His was definitely a unique and fascinating life.

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