Are garments required after death?


Bini

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I know that LDS that have gone through the temple are required to wear garments, day and night, and even in death - I understand members are buried with garments underneath other clothing. I\\\'m curious though, will garments be necessary in life after death? If known or speculated \\\"yes\\\", part of me wonders why... My understanding is that garments are to remind faithful LDS of their commitment to God\\\'s ordinances, but once you\\\'re dead and the veil has been lifted, what further purpose would they have? Especially, if you\\\'ve made it to God\\\'s highest kingdom, and are now perfect - being a God yourself and creating/ruling your own worlds - you wouldn\\\'t need a constant reminder of garments...

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As Folk points out, this is pretty much an area of pure supposition. I will suppose though that if we do wear clothing in the next life it will be because of the symbolism of the clothing. It's not like the usual pragmatic concerns will apply (except modesty).

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Good Morning Bini. I hope you've been well! :)

 

I know that LDS that have gone through the temple are required to wear garments, day and night, and even in death - I understand members are buried with garments underneath other clothing. I\\\'m curious though, will garments be necessary in life after death? If known or speculated \\\"yes\\\", part of me wonders why... My understanding is that garments are to remind faithful LDS of their commitment to God\\\'s ordinances, but once you\\\'re dead and the veil has been lifted, what further purpose would they have? Especially, if you\\\'ve made it to God\\\'s highest kingdom, and are now perfect - being a God yourself and creating/ruling your own worlds - you wouldn\\\'t need a constant reminder of garments...

 

The garments worn under clothing are for this life only. This is specifically designated in the initiatory.

 

-Finrock

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Traveler, once one has reached exaltation and has become a God himself, it would seem that discipline and sacrifice (in the context of wearing garments) would serve no purpose because you are perfect.

 

As others have stated we don't know what we'll wear in the next life, and it does appear that the garments are for this life.

 

However, discipline and sacrifice are still required of perfect beings. One glaring example is the atoning sacrifice, I'm sure it required plenty of discipline and sacrifice from both the Father and Son, both of which are perfect.

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Traveler, once one has reached exaltation and has become a God himself, it would seem that discipline and sacrifice (in the context of wearing garments) would serve no purpose because you are perfect.

 

Discipline is very interesting - I use to practice music - I still learn new things - but mostly I play for enjoyment.  It is the same with exercise.  I love the quiet of being by myself of my cycling.  What was once a sacrifice and a constant effort has become part of me and what I enjoy and find comfort.

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I'm going to be burned and the ashes put into a brick of cement and thrown in the ocean...

 

is there a policy about burning them?

 

There is a policy about burning dead folk. It's discouraged. There is policy about how to deal with the disposal of garments, but burning is not problematic within the scope of said policy.

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Not sure whether you're referring to cremation, Lakumi, but my understanding is that there is no hard doctrine on it. That said, there has been a preference within Church members to lean towards burial versus cremation. But I know that in some countries, cremation is very much the standard way of dealing with the dead, and I'm sure LDS members are no exception. My husband and I have seriously considered being cremated instead of put into a box.

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I read "not encouraged" as a more relaxed stance than "discouraged". From the Church Handbook of Instruction vol 2, 21.3.2:

 

 

Cremation

The Church does not normally encourage cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation.

 

Where possible, the body of a deceased member who has been endowed should be dressed in temple clothing when it is cremated. A funeral service may be held (see 18.6).

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I read "not encouraged" as a more relaxed stance than "discouraged". From the Church Handbook of Instruction vol 2, 21.3.2:

 

I read it exactly the same, but phrased in a way so those who must do not feel badly in any regard. If you mustn't, then I think discouraged is still an appropriate interpretation.

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I think the statement  discouraging/not encouraging cremation is a hold over from an older interpretation of the Resurrection.  When my grandfather wrote in his will his preference to be cremated, some of my great aunts were horrified because, "how will the pieces be put together in the Resurrection?"

 

As we've gotten past the idea that people will rise from their literal graves, there has seemed to be far less organizational opposition to cremation.  I largely see this as one of those things like contraception--it used to be a much bigger deal than it is now.

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I know that LDS that have gone through the temple are required to wear garments, day and night, and even in death - I understand members are buried with garments underneath other clothing. I\\\'m curious though, will garments be necessary in life after death? 

 

I sure hope not.  If they are, I'm going to have to declare that one more way heaven isn't really like heaven to me.

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Not sure whether you're referring to cremation, Lakumi, but my understanding is that there is no hard doctrine on it. That said, there has been a preference within Church members to lean towards burial versus cremation. But I know that in some countries, cremation is very much the standard way of dealing with the dead, and I'm sure LDS members are no exception. My husband and I have seriously considered being cremated instead of put into a box.

 

Yeah I have no interest in being tossed into a box, or even into the ground, as I said I want to have my ashes mixed with concrete, left to harden into a great stone block and thrown into the deep ocean.

I would say, at the funeral (whatever from it might take-and if I was a true LDS when I die) would be the only time I wore garments, due to the weird sensory issues I have with fabric in life.

I'd be dead, what would I care.

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Traveler, once one has reached exaltation and has become a God himself, it would seem that discipline and sacrifice (in the context of wearing garments) would serve no purpose because you are perfect.

 

For the record it is my plan to donate my body to sicence as a last act of service to others.  My wife currently wants us to be burried side by side.  I figure once she has passed on she will view such things differently - but right now what happens to me appears to be according to who passes first.

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I wonder if this gives any insight into the question.

 

[Moroni] had on a loose robe of most exquisite whiteness. It was a whiteness beyond anything earthly I had ever seen; nor do I believe that any earthly thing could be made to appear so exceedingly white and brilliant. His hands were naked, and his arms also, a little above the wrist; so, also, were his feet naked, as were his legs, a little above the ankles. His head and neck were also bare. I could discover that he had no other clothing on but this robe, as it was open, so that I could see into his bosom.

 

Joseph Smith History 1:31

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MOE, your last comment is interesting. I can see a lot of people feeling the same way.

 

People do feel this way, about many things.

 

But it reminds me of the story of Fanny Young when she said to Joseph Smith concerning eternal marriage, “Now, don’t talk to me; when I get into the celestial kingdom, if I ever get there, I shall request the privilege of being a ministering angel; that is the labor I wish to perform. I don’t want any companion in that world; and if the Lord will make me a ministering angel, it is all I want.”

 

To which Joseph told her, “Sister, you talk very foolishly, you do not know what you will want.”

 

We simply do not know what we will want and it is, as Joseph put it, speaking "very foolishly" to presume what we will and won't want.

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TFP, I don't know about that.

 

 

I have also heard that if you're a non-believer in this life, and not just, but harbour serious disregard towards the Lord - that isn't just magically going to change in the next life. Which is why people are still offered and have the opportunity to accept the gospel and be baptised post-mortem. So I would challenge the notion that we won't know what we want and don't want. I believe we will be aware of the things we desire and don't desire in the next life. Of course, that doesn't mean our view can't or won't change, that's not what I've said.

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