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Reccomend me a good Manga!

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I've been searching for a good, clean manga for a while now with no success. However, I'm thinking about starting the Studio Ghibli type ones, like Spirited Away, Howl's moving castle, ect. Are they good, clean? If you have any favorites, post away!

Edited by Animals

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The only manga i've read is a little bit of Naruto. It seemed alright for the most part. There is  violence (ninja's fighting each other) and a little sexual based humor at some parts. I don't know if you would like to read it for those reasons. 

 

I've seen several of the Studio Ghibli shows, and they have been very family friendly and good shows. I assume a manga adaptation would be similar.

Edited by Crypto

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I've been searching for a good, clean manga for a while now with no success. However, I'm thinking about starting the Studio Ghibli type ones, like Spirited Away, Howl's moving castle, ect. Are they good, clean? If you have any favorites, post away!

Yes Miyazaki's "Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind" manga collection is an extremely good one, as well as being real clean. worst about it is there is some war violence, and one brief bath scene- not very detailed however. It will spoil you tho- I tend not to like or care for most mangas and anime because I pretty much grew up only on the Miyazaki stuff, in regards to Japanese animation. and that sets a a real high standard. Love the main character.

 

It has one of my favorite fiction characters.

 

another manga I've really enjoyed has been the Rurouni Kenshin/ Samurai X series. My second fave fictional character almost equal to Nausicaa. This one is also real clean but there are some death scenes in it so there is some blood, but no guts. I love the Main character's honor, virtue, and honesty.  I love how repentance is the main undercurrent that moves the main character.

 

I've also enjoyed what I've seen from Yu-Yu Hakisho / Spirit Detective, which has been pretty good so far

 

Edited by Blackmarch

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so ya Studio Ghibli passes everything real well. Also it did the last movie that actually had me sobbing by the time it was done too. (grave of the fireflies).
Princess mononoke is really good but there is some violence (someone gets de-armed) and the demon scenes can be a bit unsettling.

Oh ya Cowboy Bebop- awesome space opera.



 

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Another manga I have really enjoyed has been the Battle Angel / Gunnm series. However it is centered around combat... granted just about everybody are cyborgs in really weird body configurations (closer to be robots), however the artist's quality and detail, and story are really well done (insanely well done)- which is both the good and the bad about the series- you'll have a robot get chopped in half or something violent only to find it has a brain and spine and lungs inside it.... drawn well enough to be used in an anatomy class at college, or you'll get the back story to some of the bad guys (some are really dark and disturbing). I love how the character progresses and grows throughout the story. However I wish the author did spend more time with event when the main character finally finds out about her past and resolving that and coming to grips with that than he did (she finds out she was almost polar opposite of what she has become). very little skin is seen throughout the series (I can only recall maybe 2 or 3 scenes where the skin is excessive out of 20+ books).
Many many concepts are explored throughout the series, some disturbing some fascinating, some as a warning.

 

Edited by Blackmarch

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How exactly do you define "clean"? 

 

Do you mean "No violence / nudity / cursing / et cetra whatsoever", or "The less, the better"? 

 

I ask this because it's something we'd need to know in order to better tailor our recommendations, especially since manga often have completely different tones from their accompanying anime series.  

 

For example, the second "Yu-Gi-Oh" anime, as presented by 4Kids!, was an all-ages-friendly action / fantasy series that covered the second half of the manga series (plus a full season and a half of filler).

 

Said manga, however, was anything but all-ages. I only got as far as the 6th volume before the recession forced me to scale back on non-essential spending, but even then things were already pretty heavy. The main characters aren't even close to being as innocent as the anime portrays them, and in fact they are even forced into killing several villains in self-defense (such as when a wanted serial killer comes after Joey or an escaped inmate takes Tea hostage). Mind you, this is before we include the people who Yami kills and maims simply because he's a psychopath and they've wronged Yugi or his friends in some fashion.

 

A person who expected the manga to be as "tame" as the anime would thus be quite shocked by what they saw. 

Edited by Ironhold

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My niece and nephew are into Vampire Knights.  They're 8 and 10 years old, so I'd say they're clean even if I haven't a clue about the story.  My brother normally won't give them anything that's not clean.  But yeah, "clean" can be relative.  Even within the church.  My kids play Halo which our cub scoutmaster's kids are not allowed to play.

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What's Magna?

 

Manga not Magna... Japanese comics.

 

Yes, you read it from back to front... but they are in English.

Edited by anatess

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What's Magna?

 

manga = Japanese comics. 

 

manhua = (South) Korean comics. 

 

In Japan, manga is an all-audiences deal. You can find everything from happy little kid-friendly titles to hardcore porn. Generally speaking, manga is serialized through various weekly or monthly publications. One famous title was the long-running Comic Bom Bom, which ran from 1981 - 2007 and included manga based on such properties as "Transformers" and "Mega Man"; sister publication TV Magazine also included "Transformers" manga. If a series is popular enough, then the individual chapters will be collected into paperback books and printed in volumes. On occasion, however, you'll see a manga title that goes straight to collected volumes. 

 

It's common for manga to be part of a larger multi-media franchise. In some instances, the manga is an adaptation of a previous work, such as a novel series, a video game, or a television show. In other instances, the manga is the original source and the other media (television shows, video games, movies, et cetra) are adapted off of it. 

 

It's common for manga artists to get their start doing doujinshi, small print-run comics that can be anything from "promising but unfinished original work" to "shamelessly unauthorized material depicting characters from another person's property" (Japan's intellectual property laws are so lax that a person can literally make and sell comic books and movies that use someone else's IP). Care should be taken to distinguish doujinshi from officially-sanctioned work, however, especially since much of the former is "adult-oriented" and so unwary individuals mistakenly picking up doujin instead of manga can easily find themselves in for a rude awakening. Famed mangaka Yasuhiro Nightow was reportedly so horrified to discover that a store was selling adult doujin based on his "Trigun" franchise right next to his own official material that he threatened to have his publisher halt shipments of new product to any retailer who didn't keep the two separate. 

Edited by Ironhold

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Manga not Magna... Japanese comics.

 

Yes, you read it from back to front... but they are in English.

 

Actually, some publishers infamously flipped the panels on early printings so that they read left-to-right like Western audiences are used to. 

 

One title to get hit by this was Viz' run of "No Need For Tenchi!". The early print runs were over-sized, had the artwork flipped, and went for a $15 MSRP. Later print runs were normal-sized, kept the artwork in the original fashion, and had a $10 MSRP. Unfortunate individuals such as myself who couldn't complete a full run of either style were left with a rather odd display of mismatched books. 

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Manga not Magna... Japanese comics.

 

Yes, you read it from back to front... but they are in English.

that's preferrable but some companies do flip the page order so they are more english standard.... the problem with this is that all the pictures are mirrored, so things like logos and text in the background are backward.

on a seperate issue, you tend to run into is cultural etiquette (or the type that is expected in media anyways) is a bit different than ours.

Edited by Blackmarch

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well, I can concur with my fellow manga and anime fans that Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind is a fine addition to a collection. I can also recommend : Barefoot through Hiroshima. Ah! my Goddess for it´s very lighthearted humor. Also from the Same feather You are under arrest! if you like slice of life stories. If you do enjoy good Scifi and can abide violence I can lay Battle Angel Alita at your feet and Last order. 

Other than that if you like some romance with swords and sandals. Red river is nice. And Magic Knight rayearth along with Clover makes for nice reading. 

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I'm presently working my way through some volumes of "Prince of Tennis" I found second-hand. 

The premise of the series is that 7th grade student Ryoma Echizen is such a skilled tennis player that he's even facing off against 9th graders in contests and tournaments. This leads to his quickly being snatched up by a junior high school (7th - 9th grades) that is trying to assemble the most elite squad they can piece together; they've even convinced a former professional tennis player to come out of retirement so she can coach them. 

Some of the characters are visibly injured through botched plays and other mishaps of the type that one might expect an athlete to periodically encounter, and some of the personal confrontations threaten to become physical in places. 

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are you meassuring "best" in terms of sales or rather content ? it is a rather subjective question. certainnly you will find me in the Appleseed, Ghost in the Shell, Dominion Tank Police and Gunsmith Cats  corner, sprinkled with Magic Knight rayeearth and with a good doese of Eden from Hiroki Endo. Maybe even throw in some x1999 

However I can guarantee you that from a church point of view this are highly inappropriate but from a human perspective offer a lot of things to think about. 

 

now you have done it gator, you made me feel old again =P 

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Another thing to consider is that following any given manga series can potentially be quite expensive. It's rather common for titles to get 15+ volumes, and some long-runners (like Naruto and One Piece) are on track to hit the hundreds. MSRP for most volumes of manga is $10 - $15 US, so we could easily be talking hundreds or even thousands of dollars just for one title. 

Additionally, it does sometimes happen that the manga are simply part of a larger multi-media experience. For example, the .Hack franchise covers not just manga, but also anime, novels, and video games (although one installment of the anime, .Hack//Legend, was later thrown down the memory hole because the creative team went off on their own instead of following the established franchise script). You can get a good idea of what's going on by following one path, but since they're meant to tie into each other you miss out on things if you don't at least have an idea of what happened in the other titles. 

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46 minutes ago, Ironhold said:

Another thing to consider is that following any given manga series can potentially be quite expensive. It's rather common for titles to get 15+ volumes, and some long-runners (like Naruto and One Piece) are on track to hit the hundreds. MSRP for most volumes of manga is $10 - $15 US, so we could easily be talking hundreds or even thousands of dollars just for one title. 

Additionally, it does sometimes happen that the manga are simply part of a larger multi-media experience. For example, the .Hack franchise covers not just manga, but also anime, novels, and video games (although one installment of the anime, .Hack//Legend, was later thrown down the memory hole because the creative team went off on their own instead of following the established franchise script). You can get a good idea of what's going on by following one path, but since they're meant to tie into each other you miss out on things if you don't at least have an idea of what happened in the other titles. 

.hack// sign is perpetual poverty ;-) if you want it all

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One manga I've been hearing a lot about is "Sweetness and Lightning." The manga just got an English translation, and the anime is airing now in Japan. 

The premise is that a high school math teacher is forced to become a single father to a 5-year-old girl after his wife is killed in an accident. The poor guy's so overwhelmed between work and raising the girl himself that they're pretty well living off of takeout and whatever he can get at the local convenience store since he doesn't have a whole lot of time for cooking anything beyond the basics. 

Things change when he discovers that one of his students belongs to a family that owns a small but profitable family restaurant. The student wants to be a chef some day, but her mother's aspirations of greatness for the facility has resulted in the woman spending more time with her clientele than her own daughter and so she's not being taught what she needs to know to actually take over. 

The teacher agrees to hire the student on as a cook, something that helps everyone out. The teacher and the girl are now guaranteed at least one home-cooked meal a day, even if it is trial-and-error. The student, meanwhile, now has a resume and her own cookbook of from-scratch recipes she can honestly claim to have developed on her own. 

 

Much of the manga and anime is, as you can imagine, given over to cooking; the manga prints the recipes at the end of each chapter where the cooking takes place, while the anime makes it a point to slow those scenes down enough for people to follow along at home. 

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On August 3, 2016 at 2:00 PM, MormonGator said:

What would any of you say is the best Magna series ever? Sort of like the one to read if you are not into Magna and don't know much about it. 

Nausicaa of the valley of the wind hands down, altho while it is seperate books its not treated like a series... So it might fail at the qualification of series. Battle angel and kenshin are the two series i keep getting drawn back to time and again.

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