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prisonchaplain

Psychology Religion and Sexual Identity

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My daughter is thinking of being a psychologist.  We are encouraging her.  However, one area of concern is the integration of religious faith and this field.  Historically, there is the perception that psychology is at odds with religion.  The issue of sexual orientation and identity has highlighted this concern--especially with APA's rejection of reparative therapies.

 

Things are not always as they seem.  APA is realizing that a psychology vs. conservative religion dichotomy was developing--and that such should not be the case.  A break through seems to have developed with APA's endorsement of the SIT (Sexual Identity Therapy) framework.  In essence, it recognizes that some clients find their religious identity to be more important than their sexual orientation, and that shunting their sexuality to the side, to live celibately, or even eventually, to live in a mixed-orientation marriage, can be ethical and beneficial. 

 

Is anyone familiar with the SIT framework?  One of the best known psychologists using it is Dr. Warren Throckmorton (Grove City College). 

 

http://sitframework.com/sitf-for-the-public/

Edited by prisonchaplain

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I'm not familiar with it by name, but didn't you post about something similar fairly recently--a former president of the APA who was recognizing the role of religion in mental health, or somesuch thing?

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I can't speak to SIT, but from my personal experience as a therapy patient.  Good therapy will give you the tools to go where you want to go (or not go if you don't want to work).   If a person wants to achieve/identify X, if they are getting good therapy and putting in the effort, then they will eventually get X. 

 

No one external (including a therapist) can make you do/be/want anything you don't want to.

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My daughter is thinking of being a psychologist.  We are encouraging her.  However, one area of concern is the integration of religious faith and this field.  Historically, there is the perception that psychology is at odds with religion.  The issue of sexual orientation and identity has highlighted this concern--especially with APA's rejection of reparative therapies.

 

Things are not always as they seem.  APA is realizing that a psychology vs. conservative religion dichotomy was developing--and that such should not be the case.  A break through seems to have developed with APA's endorsement of the SIT (Sexual Identity Therapy) framework.  In essence, it recognizes that some clients find their religious identity to be more important than their sexual orientation, and that shunting their sexuality to the side, to live celibately, or even eventually, to live in a mixed-orientation marriage, can be ethical and beneficial. 

 

Is anyone familiar with the SIT framework?  One of the best known psychologists using it is Dr. Warren Throckmorton (Grove City College). 

 

http://sitframework.com/sitf-for-the-public/

 

Yes, I am familiar with it and a therapist. How wonderful it is you are encouraging your daughter to pursue this field. We need many more strong, faithful Christians in the field. I thought it was interesting when I entered the schooling process the advisers "warned" me I would loose my faith. I smiled and reassured them my faith is in God, not your school.

 

The field of psychology has come a long way in the last 20 years in recognizing the importance of faith. Nonetheless, the APA and experts in the field are always trying to create a niche and pander to a population. But this isn't to concerning because there is enough good science and persons of faith to provide substance to the work. This is one of the reasons I decided to go into private practice as that venue allows me to practice without the distractions of these trending concepts.

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Jane, one motivation for APA was to counter the reparative therapy efforts of non-professionals.  By creating space for the professional and cautious efforts of psychologists like Dr. Throckmorton, they defuse the desperation that led to clients placing themselves in the hands of groups that had no professional training or backing.

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