Suggestions on emergency steps for a 4-year old


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It dawned on me the other day that: (1) we don't have a household landline and (2) our iPhones are locked. So this makes it impossible for our 4-year old to dial 911 for help. I've been talking with other mothers with children close in age to my daughter. It was suggested that she knows how to contact a trusted neighbour in the event that I'm unresponsive. I can't say that this is down-pat but she does understand that she should go next door to our resident police officer or across the culdesac to our resident nurse for help. (We're really lucky to have an officer and nurse right by us!) We've talked to both neighbours and their spouses, they know it's just us and our little girl in the house, and they've always said to holler if we ever needed anything.

 

Anyway, any suggestions on emergency steps if the above is a no-go, and other neighbours are not answering their doors? She knows daddy's and mummy's first and last name. She knows the name of the city we live in. So she does know basic personal information. Not sure what else she should memorise. I've been thinking about her learning one of our phone numbers but we don't ever answer unknown calls, but if a message is left, we eventually listen to it. So that might actually not be a bad idea.

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Interesting, I have never thought about this problem before, the no land-line thing. Your cell phone should have an emergency function that does not require the phone to be unlocked. My iPhone allows you to choose make an emergency call right from the locked phone keypad. I'm not sure what other phones are equipped with, but it might be a good idea to show her how to use that. And I have seen ideas, on Pinterest and elsewhere, meant for when you travel with kids but might be applicable here. For instance a bracelet with the plastic beads that have letters and numbers with an important phone number. A magnet on the fridge that is kept within her eyelevel and reach with those numbers and your address would be good too - with pictures of your faces and other things she would recognize as prompts. 

Edited by char713
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http://www.att.com/devices/filip/filip-2.html#sku=sku7470244?WT.srch=1&source=ECPS0000000PSM00P

There are also limited-function cell phones, but I like the idea of being able to edit the allowed number list remotely from a smartphone, GPS locate the watch, (including notification if it goes out of or into preset areas) and that it has an emergency feature that calls all the saved numbers and tells anyone answering that there's an emergency, as well as popup notifications on the cellphone set up to administrate it. $100 for the watch and $10/mo for the service (if adding it to an existing plan) seems cheap for that kid of peace of mind.

Edited by NightSG
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A locked iPhone can be used to call in an Emergency.  You can teach your 4 year old to swipe the locked screen which will display the keypad.  She can then touch the Emergency link on the bottom left section and then use the keypad to dial 911.

 

But this is just one small part of Emergency Preparedness (yes, yes, my husband is a boy scout so he taught our kids emergency preparedness the moment they started talking and understanding instructions).

 

These are things we've taught our kids when they were little:

1.)  Talked about what 911 is, when to dial it, how to dial it, what to say, and role played (yes, yes, it's how boy scouts teach)

2.)  We talked about Hurricanes (we're in Florida) and what can happen.  Showed the kids where the emergency kit is (we have a 3-day emergency backpack) and showed them where food and water is in the backpack and things such as the emergency blanket, the flashlight, etc.  Yeah, we practiced by living off the backpack too (another boy scout method).

3.)  Talked about Fires and what can happen.  Showed things like - if the fire is here, you go out here... if there's smoke, crawl, etc. etc.

4.)  Established a go-to neighbor.  If the kids have to evacuate the house, where they need to go to... etc.

5.)  We established a passcode.  If they get separated, they are not to believe anyone's message from us unless it comes with the passcode.

6.)  Enrolled kids in  martial arts as young as 5 years old and scouts at 7 years old (Tiger cubs - not offered in Church, unfortunately).  And taught spatial awareness - always observe one's surroundings and choose a good environment (e.g. the sidewalk is a better environment than the inside of a stranger's car).

7.)  Taught to kids it's okay to be scared, it's okay to cry, it's okay to be worried, it's okay to be confused... but, no matter what happens, never ever ever stop thinking.  Always think and break down the situation into small immediate problems... then think - Problem... Solution.  Don't stop thinking of Problem - Solution.  Solve each problem one at a time until you see the way through.

 

But yeah, we didn't really do a formal lessons type of thing.  It's just things we teach kids on the fly - usually during family home evenings or dinners or when we're out spending family time or when we're stuck in the car traveling across the country...

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Interesting, I have never thought about this problem before, the no land-line thing. Your cell phone should have an emergency function that does not require the phone to be unlocked. My iPhone allows you to choose make an emergency call right from the locked phone keypad. I'm not sure what other phones are equipped with, but it might be a good idea to show her how to use that. And I have seen ideas, on Pinterest and elsewhere, meant for when you travel with kids but might be applicable here. For instance a bracelet with the plastic beads that have letters and numbers with an important phone number. A magnet on the fridge that is kept within her eyelevel and reach with those numbers and your address would be good too - with pictures of your faces and other things she would recognize as prompts. 

 

It dawned on me the other day that: (1) we don't have a household landline and (2) our iPhones are locked. So this makes it impossible for our 4-year old to dial 911 for help. I've been talking with other mothers with children close in age to my daughter. It was suggested that she knows how to contact a trusted neighbour in the event that I'm unresponsive. I can't say that this is down-pat but she does understand that she should go next door to our resident police officer or across the culdesac to our resident nurse for help. (We're really lucky to have an officer and nurse right by us!) We've talked to both neighbours and their spouses, they know it's just us and our little girl in the house, and they've always said to holler if we ever needed anything.

 

Anyway, any suggestions on emergency steps if the above is a no-go, and other neighbours are not answering their doors? She knows daddy's and mummy's first and last name. She knows the name of the city we live in. So she does know basic personal information. Not sure what else she should memorise. I've been thinking about her learning one of our phone numbers but we don't ever answer unknown calls, but if a message is left, we eventually listen to it. So that might actually not be a bad idea.

either keep trying more doors or a brick through a window if there is no accessible phone. shouting for help along the way as well.

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For awhile, we did not have a land-line.  We have since found a very inexpensive way to have one.  The only reason we have the land-line is because my grandson is very often with us and I want him to have a way to contact us or 911 if needed.

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The main reason I like the kid-oriented limited cell phones, cell watches, etc. is simply that it provides a more versatile emergency response; lots of things can be handled by a trusted neighbor rather than calling 911. It also gives the option of calling mom, dad or another trusted adult when all the kid needs is an answer or a bit of reassurance.

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