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Food Storage - diminished emphasis?

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42 minutes ago, zil said:

If that's necessary, the world is in worse shape that I thought, cuz I've never killed or dressed an animal, but I have know for as long as I can remember (from childhood) that meat is parts of dead animals - e.g. hamburger, steak, and liver came from cow, chicken and turkey were birds, pork chops came from pigs....  I'm reasonably certain I learned this from my parents.  Quite possibly related to scriptural animal sacrifices, but I really don't remember.

Wait a minute!  I thought hamburgers came from McDonalds, steak came from Sizzler, and pork chops came from the butcher.  My parents didn't teach me anything.

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51 minutes ago, zil said:

If that's necessary, the world is in worse shape that I thought, cuz I've never killed or dressed an animal, but I have know for as long as I can remember (from childhood) that meat is parts of dead animals - e.g. hamburger, steak, and liver came from cow, chicken and turkey were birds, pork chops came from pigs....  I'm reasonably certain I learned this from my parents.  Quite possibly related to scriptural animal sacrifices, but I really don't remember.

When I get pizza I usually tell my family that I got yeast impregnated flour based staff surmounted with sauce from a semi-poisonous plant topped with solid portions of soured, curdled lactations from a bovine species and a cured sausage made of cattle and pig fat with slivered portions of common fungus, ... and olives.

Edited by Guest

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1 hour ago, Carborendum said:

When I get pizza I usually tell my family that I got yeast impregnated flour based staff surmounted with sauce from a semi-poisonous plant topped with solid portions of soured, curdled lactations from a bovine species and a cured sausage made of cattle and pig fat with slivered portions of common fungus, ... and olives.

Heavy on the slivered portions of common fungus, double the solid portions of soured, curdled lactations from a bovine species, hold the olives, add tidbits of a tropical plant with edible multiple fruit consisting of coalesced berries.

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4 hours ago, Vort said:

Don't know about a carbon filter, either, but I'm wondering if it would be as easy as grinding up charcoal from your lye fire and running water through a column of that.

 

Easier to show than tell:

 

 

 

 

Edited by LeSellers

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5 hours ago, Carborendum said:

When I get pizza I usually tell my family that I got yeast impregnated flour based staff surmounted with sauce from a semi-poisonous plant topped with solid portions of soured, curdled lactations from a bovine species and a cured sausage made of cattle and pig fat with slivered portions of common fungus, ... and olives.

Don't forget that olives are cured with lye to make them edible.

http://honest-food.net/2012/10/15/curing-olives-lye-recipe/

Lehi

Edited by LeSellers

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8 minutes ago, zil said:

So in a pinch, you can use [cured olives] to make soap? :crackup:

Haven't tried that. Let us know what happens.:rolleyes:

Lehi

Edited by LeSellers

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16 minutes ago, Jojo Bags said:

I've seen olive oil soap.  Is that the same thing?

Palmolive soaps are made from olive oil and palm oil with lye. So, you may be right.

Lehi

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To make soap, add lye (sodium or potassium hydroxide) water to oils or liquified fats, stir, and let it sit for a while. Too much lye and you have lye soap, which is rather nasty on your skin; too little and you have greasy fat soap, which is kinda gross. What you want is to have just a little overabundance of oil, and make sure the last (overabundant) oil you add is something nice, like olive oil or your favorite essential oil.

Also, it's a good idea to strain your fat first, unless you like flecks of bacon in your soap. (Which might be pretty cool, actually.)

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9 hours ago, Vort said:

Bacon soap attracts men like flies. Or maybe it's men and flies.

Actually, they did tests with ultrasound, on guys... and it was the smell of cinnamon rolls which got the strongest reaction...  'nuff said (or maybe too much).

Edited by zil

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1 hour ago, Carborendum said:

Bacon is teh most perfect food ever!!!

We have a brother in our ward that passes out lollipops each Sunday to all the kids. We got home after church and I went into the room where my kids were at. It smelled horrible in there. I said, "Why does this room smell like dog food?". They all looked at me and said, "We don't know". I asked what they were eating. They said, "Oh, just bacon flavored lollipops". 

B-a-r-f. I love bacon, but n-a-s-t-y! 

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My sense is that the brethren are working with everything they have to help us prepare Spiritually.  Until our motivation to prepare all needful things is to serve others then we haven't been blessed with the true motivation to prepare all needful things...my opinion....http://lds.net/blog/author/kathleen-omeal/

I have been amazed how many times the greatest blessing of preparedness has been the joy in being able to succor or lift someone else.

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28 minutes ago, Kathleen OMeal said:

My sense is that the brethren are working with everything they have to help us prepare Spiritually.  Until our motivation to prepare all needful things is to serve others then we haven't been blessed with the true motivation to prepare all needful things...my opinion....http://lds.net/blog/author/kathleen-omeal/

I have been amazed how many times the greatest blessing of preparedness has been the joy in being able to succor or lift someone else.

I "liked" your post for the content, but would have loved to give it 2nd "like" for the fact that a "food" specialist has the word "meal" in their name, wow perfect fit!

Hum... that is assuming your real name is OMeal...inquiring minds:detective:

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Get your food storage! Think of it as a commodity investment. The church is probably quieting down because of the allegations of hording. In some countries it is illegal to have a year supply. In this country it puts a person on a watch list for being anti-government. With a certainty it will be needed in the near future. Be sure it is one year of long term storage and an additional 3 months of short term. 

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1 hour ago, Sadliers said:

Get your food storage! Think of it as a commodity investment. The church is probably quieting down because of the allegations of hording. In some countries it is illegal to have a year supply. In this country it puts a person on a watch list for being anti-government. With a certainty it will be needed in the near future. Be sure it is one year of long term storage and an additional 3 months of short term. 

Right now we are counseled to have a 3 month supply of food and things we would use on a daily basis.  Once we have that, we should build on our long term storage.

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I haven't seen a decline in talk about food storage or in provident living in my Ward.  Our Relief Society even set up a pantry in the Relief Society closet with about a month's supply of food for those new members or anyone caught without food for when they've had an emergency, just moved in or is waiting for the storehouse to open and fill their food order from the Bishop.

When you meet with the Bishop he asks about your food storage as does the Relief Society President, our Visiting Teacher and even my Home Teacher.  It may be because I live in an agricultural city where the unemployment is high especially because of the drought, the emphasis has been to store up food, money and hunker down and get busy getting re-educated and skilled to work in a different career.  Heavy emphasis in self-reliance including paying tithing and fast offerings is not lost in my Ward and in fact it wasn't 6 mos ago during our 5th Sunday combined Relief Society/Priesthood meeting this was addressed.

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12 hours ago, DeborahInCalif said:

I haven't seen a decline in talk about food storage or in provident living in my Ward.

the unemployment is high especially because of the drought,

Glad to hear it's still a topic. Sad to hear why.

Sadder still that this seems to be the only reason anyone talks about it.

Lehi

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On 3/11/2016 at 7:06 PM, mrmarklin said:

I doubt a de-emphasis, but if there is maybe it's good. Food storage is about 20% of the self reliance pamphlet but ended up as almost the only thing people perceived as valuable IMO. In addition, two years of food storage is totally impractical for the majority of the church members. Even for those that have space for this probably end up wasting most of it because food has a shelf life. People don't eat the type of food stored mostly, and it eventually rots. 

72 hours of supplies is a great idea.  But the reality is under a serious emergency, water is the most severe limitation to survival.

Quote

 

Nearly two years ago, Hubby and I were asked to give a 5th Sunday presentation on Emergency Preparedness. Hubby emphasized emergency,  I emphasized food. What I focused on was treating your food storage as an In Home Grocery Store. Do NOT store foods that you do not necessarily like, or have never cooked before or do not know how to cook. If you are storing XX pounds of whole wheat, do you have a wheat grinder. Do you know how to cook whole grains? I did a power point presentation, plus I had written as large as possible on the portable dry erase board: DO NOT STORE FOODS YOU HAVE NEVER EATEN OR EVEN LIKE.

One thing I would like to compile is a list of foods with their actual shelf life. Like Mayo - unopened, in a room temperature cupboard/closet - 6 months max. Opened in the fridge - two months at the max. I write the date I actually bought it, then when I open it, I write Opened dd/mm/yyyy. When it gets to be two months later and there is at lease 1/3 of a jar left, I use it to make a cake. Mayonnaise Chocolate Cake.

I also stressed the need to protect your food & storage items from pests. Take a walk through your store and write down what is in each aisle. Using the hanging aisle markers, then adding other items that are in those aisles. List them in the order they are on the shelf. Top to bottom. This project is going to take your hours to do. Going with your spouse will make it go faster, and both of you will then know what the current prices are.

Now, set up your food storage in the same order as the store. Because I do not have a garage or basement, my storage is my kitchen, two large cupboards in my dining room and two larger cupboards in the master bedroom, plus all of the toilet paper is on the top most shelf in the master bedroom clothes closet. Oh, I forgot the two top shelves in the hall linen closet - that is where all of the personal hygiene and medical stuff is. There is a cupboard above the closet, but I can't reach in it. I can't even get up to where I can see in it. Right now there are some empty (MT) boxes in there that are over 5 years old and need to be broken down and put in the recycling. BUT I can't reach them. The last 4 sets of full time missionaries were short, we now have one who is tall (6'3") so I will ask him to climb up on the ladder and empty out that cupboard. BUT, because it is too high for me to put things in and get things out of, it will remain unused.

My kitchen cupboards are set up with my most commonly used foods. When I run out of canned corn, syrup, tuna fish, etc., & before I add items to the shopping list, I check my grocery store aka food storage. When I take the next to the last item from storage that is when I write it down on the shopping list.

To me that is Preparedness. That is how I grew up. We were not LDS until my brother started scouts at the LDS church when he was 15 (1959). Grandma owned a Cafe/Bakery during the depression. Her business thrived. She grew her own vegetables and bartered for fruits. For the price of a meal for a family of 4-8, the family would bring in their ration chits for sugar &/or flour. Farmers would bring her cow and goat milk, & eggs for a pie or cake. Her oldest son knew where free honey could be got and she baked more with honey than with sugar. Her customers also sweetened their coffee/tea with honey rather than sugar.

By storing the foods you like and will eat, you will thrive rather than survive when the S.H.T.F.

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9 hours ago, LeSellers said:

Glad to hear it's still a topic. Sad to hear why.

Sadder still that this seems to be the only reason anyone talks about it.

Lehi

Yes, sadder still is when my Bishop informed me when I was struggling to find work that there were degreed members of the church flipping burgers at fast food joints because there just isn't work out there.  Sadly too, while I live in the breadbasket of the world, we have a lot of Ward members out of work, unable to store food and kinda takes advantage of a generous Bishop when they get the chance.  He's far too kind in my book, while he does require us to store food, he's had to send RS to certain members' homes only to find they are lying about needing food and using the Bishop's storehouse to hoard food so that they don't have to buy it.

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