prisonchaplain

Prisonchaplain post almost identical to the 11th Article

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On LinkedIn and Facebook I published the following:

Chaplains are the front-line defenders of religious freedom. We love and live the First Amendment--our first freedom. Some are questioning the value of this cherished spiritual liberty. Some even say it is a cover for bigotry. As a Pentecostal preacher who freely hands prayer rugs to Muslims, meditation mats to Buddhists, and "Parenting Without God" books to Humanists, I reject that analysis. We facilitate the faith of others, and thus invest in our own right to worship God in spirit and in truth. May America never jettison its most precious pact with religious freedom.

 

Then noticed that what I wrote was Kinda similar to this:

 

Articles of Faith #11:  We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.

Edited by prisonchaplain
Match title with LDS scripture reference more accurately

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1 hour ago, prisonchaplain said:

On LinkedIn and Facebook I published the following:

Chaplains are the front-line defenders of religious freedom. We love and live the First Amendment--our first freedom. Some are questioning the value of this cherished spiritual liberty. Some even say it is a cover for bigotry. As a Pentecostal preacher who freely hands prayer rugs to Muslims, meditation mats to Buddhists, and "Parenting Without God" books to Humanists, I reject that analysis. We facilitate the faith of others, and thus invest in our own right to worship God in spirit and in truth. May America never jettison its most precious pact with religious freedom.

 

 

 

Then noticed that what I wrote was Kinda similar to this:

 

 

 

Articles of Faith #11:  We claim the privilege of worshiping Almighty God according to the dictates of our own conscience, and allow all men the same privilege, let them worship how, where, or what they may.

 

The one possible point that I may disagree is that Chaplains are the front-line defenders of religious freedom.  I believe the class of defenders are citizens of a free nation that intend to remain free.  I think I would also like to make a distinction between freedom of speech and free behavior.   Your passing out prayer rugs to Muslims, mediation mas to Buddhists and such is a step beyond speech.

I believe free speech allows the anti-religious to call a religious person a bigot to their face and a religious person to call a gay individual a sinner damned to hell to their face – as long as they are in an open public place.  But if an individuals have assembled the have the right to say to each other what their assembly allows and throw out those that say things they do not like.

What I do not believe is - that anyone has the right to take away a person’s property – be it real or intellectual – especially it such property is their means to provide an otherwise profitable and legal living – in essence close down their business for what they say or believe.  We have become far too sensitive to what people say – Political correct speech is an excuse to deprive citizens of freedom.  I realize we cannot yell fire in a crowded building but speech is not bigotry nor bullying.

 

The Traveler

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Quite often freedom of speech and freedom of religion co-mingle, because part of religious practice may include public proclamation.  However, chaplains are unique in our practice of religious liberty.  To give an example, I met a Jewish religious leader, who was particularly interested in religious freedom in prisons. He strongly advocated for professional chaplaincy, because well-trained and educated religious professionals proved the most competent and protecting the practice of minority faiths, like Judaism. When state and local corrections relied on a volunteer coordinator to bring in volunteers only, inevitably only the major religions of the area got programming. When smaller groups were denied even the most basic accommodations, the excuse was always, "Well, if you could get someone to volunteer to come in...."

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3 hours ago, prisonchaplain said:

Quite often freedom of speech and freedom of religion co-mingle, because part of religious practice may include public proclamation.  However, chaplains are unique in our practice of religious liberty.  To give an example, I met a Jewish religious leader, who was particularly interested in religious freedom in prisons. He strongly advocated for professional chaplaincy, because well-trained and educated religious professionals proved the most competent and protecting the practice of minority faiths, like Judaism. When state and local corrections relied on a volunteer coordinator to bring in volunteers only, inevitably only the major religions of the area got programming. When smaller groups were denied even the most basic accommodations, the excuse was always, "Well, if you could get someone to volunteer to come in...."

PC, in many ways my heart is with you on this.  But to an LDS audience who believes in a lay ministry and whose history is replete with instances of "professional clergy" wanting to wipe us out, it's a hard sell.

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I get what @Carborendum is saying, and what PC is saying about how some Mormons fill professional positions where the job title is "chaplain" (though the Church and membership wouldn't call them that otherwise).  But from my perspective, when reading the original post, I just mentally expanded "chaplains" to include "all active Mormons".  We (Mormons) are (almost) all "clergy" and "chaplains" (at one time or another, in one way or another), we just use different words.  (Don't know if the same could be said of all Christians, but I would hope so - anyone can teach and minister in some way.)

Meanwhile, @prisonchaplain, I was not expecting what you meant by "Article 11" (I figured it was some new UN proposal or EU law or something), so I have to tell you, when you decide to go undercover and pass yourself off as a Mormon, you have to call it "the eleventh Article of Faith". ;)

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First, thanks to all respondents.  My main purpose in the OP was to urge awareness about the direct assault being waged on the Freedom of Religion.  I meant to point out the unique perspective that "professional," or "career" chaplains bring, since we accommodate/facilitate the religious practice of others as a part of our daily mission. It also struck me that religious liberty is a core value of LDS, since it is extolled in the Articles of Faith.

@Traveler brought up the freedom of speech. I agree that it is under assault, but wanted to reiterate that freedom of religion is more than that. So, I reinforced the unique perspective of professional chaplains, which hit a nerve with @Carborendum, since LDS clergy are volunteers--something your faith takes positive pride in.  My response would simply be that those who do serve as paid LDS chaplains would probably feel even more strongly about our First Freedom than I do, since they know what it is to be part of a minority religion, whom government has persecuted.

And finally...I might compromise with @zil, and refer to the Article as "the 11th Article."  :)

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PS: I totally understand and agree with what you're saying about professional chaplains, and about you facilitating the service of those belonging to other faiths - it is a distinct viewpoint.  (I didn't mean my habit of expanding the definition to minimize that.)

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9 minutes ago, prisonchaplain said:

Wow!  I'm impressed.:eek:

All kidding aside, I found the article's conclusion rather disturbing, but not unexpected. Yes, we need to band together. Because if we don't stand together, we will fall together.

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"There's a lot you can do as a person of faith to live your beliefs in a public school setting," Frandsen said after he showed a video about parents who had to help school leaders understand that it is legal for their child to say a prayer over her lunch. 

Legal, sure, but asking the Lord to make school food good for you is really a bit much.  Might as well ask Him to send grandma back to cook your lunches; it's probably easier, and has a much smaller impact on the overall state of the universe.

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26 minutes ago, NightSG said:

Legal, sure, but asking the Lord to make school food good for you is really a bit much.  Might as well ask Him to send grandma back to cook your lunches; it's probably easier, and has a much smaller impact on the overall state of the universe.

It could have been food they brought with them to school.

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It looks like the religious freedom website is still being developed.  However, this video:  https://www.lds.org/media-library/video/2013-11-1020-what-is-religious-freedom?lang=eng

is 4 1/2 years old, and highlights the concerns masterfully. 

Edited by prisonchaplain

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