Aish HaTorah

People of the Covenant - Ask a Jew

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, cathyyg said:

Ah, but the thread is not without any lurking Jews.

Seriously, genuine Jew here, ask away. 

I am a Christian who believes that Zechariah chapter 14 cannot happen..... 

until after the Jerusalem Third Temple is built and being used for several years by

Levites.  

One of the reasons why I support the rebuilding of the Jerusalem Third Temple by Jews.....

and for Jews..... is because it relates to stabilization of the climate of more than merely Israel, 

but actually the entire Middle East.  

The rituals that you will do there regarding the restoration of rain in due season will actually

have a positive effect on many, many nations.

Here is a reply that I got back from Mr. Boruch Fishman on one of the discussions that I had

going on this on another forum.

Do you Cathyyg..... believe that the Levitical rituals will assist in restoration of the climate of Israel and several surrounding nations?

I think that after a few years of not receiving rain.....

many Islamic  nation now hostile to Israel will alter their approach and allow Jews, Prostylites to Judiasm and some Noahides to attend the Festival of Tabernacles.

I am fairly certain that this verse in the Jewish Bible is certainly not advocating that in the era of Moshiach that every body has to go to Jerusalem to observe the Festival of Tabernacles, merely that nations allow their Jews and Noahides to freely travel to and back from Jerusalem in order to observe Tabernacles. 

Zechariah 14:17 "And it shall be, [that] whoso will not come up of [all] the families of the earth unto Jerusalem to worship the King, the LORD of hosts, even upon them shall be no rain."

As more of us come to the realization of how dangerous the melting and cracking and sliding that is going on in Greenland and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet really is, we will be more inclined toward supporting the Jewish people in their desire to rebuild their Third Temple.

Collapse Of Antarctic Ice Sheet Would Likely Put Washington, D.C. Largely Underwater

Mr. Fishman is Director of People For a Bill To Build The Bet HaMikdash. 
 

Hi, 

I wrote the letter about the Efforts to create architectural plans for the 3rd Temple, and a friend of Denis asked me to enter a comment here. Let me say, first off, that I am an Orthodox Jew, yet, at the same time, I was involved in an interfaith miracle in Baltimore, which is under investigation by the Archdiocese in Baltimore. The miracle and its sequel convinced me that the founder of Catholicism Yoshuah in Hebrew supports his fellow Jews, not to worship him, but to do commandments connected to Israel, including the rebuilding of the Temple. 

In 1999, there was a terrible drought in Baltimore, and I went to the Rabbis to determine the proper prayer. After I said the prayer, I had the feeling that I had just talked on the phone to a deceased Roman Catholic named Alfredo DeLeonardo. Alfredo had been blessed by Pope John XXIII that he and his children would go to Heaven for 7 generations. Alfred's daughter converted to Orthodox Judaism, and as a result I had a chance to talk with Alfred, on the telephone, one time before he died. I had a personal experience on the day of Alfred's death, which convinced me that he had, indeed gone to Heaven. So when I made my prayer, and felt that I had just talked with Alfred, I believed that my prayer and Alfred were in Heaven. I went home and told my roommate to expect rain. He told me that it couldn't rain, because he was moving to New Jersey to study Jewish law, and wouldn't be finished until Friday. He believed that he was involved in a holy avocation, and his books and clothes, the appurtenances to his religious life, wouldn't be ruined by rain during the move. He was so insistent, and the atmosphere was so holy, that I believed G-d would listen to him. So I said, because of you, the State will have to wait until Friday for rain. And that's what happened. The first rain came on Friday, and then it was rain after rain after rain. As the rains continued, I contacted Monsignor Kenny of the Archdiocese court, and he listened to my story and then asked me to send him a copy. The connection with Jesus is obvious in that he passed along the key to Heaven to Peter, and it is obvious from this miracle that the key has been passed along to the modern Popes. 

When I moved to Israel, I was invited to live in a hostel in the Old City of Jerusalem. I asked permission to build a booth in the hostel, as it was several days before our festival of the booths, when we pray for rain. The Arab manager told me the hostel, (which sits on property owned by King Abdullah), was religiously neutral and I couldn't build a booth. Besides, he said that he knew if I built a booth it would bring rain, and he, (a merchant on the outdoor market), didn't want rain. His words reminded me of the words of my roommate in Baltimore. I felt a parallel connection to the miracle in Baltimore, and believed that G-d would hold off the rains until this Arab did repentance and let me build a Succoth at that Hostel. That was 4 winters ago. Every winter since then, we have had less than the needed amounts of rain. And now, we have a serious drought in all parts of biblical Israel. 

The connection with the Temple is that the prayers for rain during the holiday of Succoth, were commandments given to Jews related to the land of Israel, and they include bring sacrifice on the Temple Mount. We have a tradition in Israel that when the Temple is rebuilt that any nation brining a sacrifice on Succoth at the Temple will be blessed with rain the next year. 

I would just like to add 2 other facts. We do not wish to "kick the Moslems off the Temple Mount." My organization calls for preservation of the AL Aksa Mosque, the third most important building to Moslems, which sits on the Southern part of the Temle Mount, and not near the location of the Jewish Temple. 

Secondly, this very month is an extremely special time for Jews. Every 28 years, we have a blessing we say for the sun, (not to the sun). This year is only the third time in our entire history that the blessing is being said on the day before Passover. The other two times were during the first redemption of the Jews from Egypt and during the second redemption of the Jews from Babylon.
(Boruch Fishman)
 
Edited by DennisTate
add comment and link

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found this thread up on the high shelf behind some boxes with old (and scary) prom photos.  Thought I'd dust it off and see if anyone wants to ask a few more questions..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Aish HaTorah said:

I found this thread up on the high shelf behind some boxes with old (and scary) prom photos.  Thought I'd dust it off and see if anyone wants to ask a few more questions..........

Is Ben Shapiro highly regarded in the Jewish community?  (as a Jewish religious practitioner and not as a political commentator).

Edited by anatess2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, anatess2 said:

Is Ben Shapiro highly regarded in the Jewish community?  (as a Jewish religious practitioner and not as a political commentator).

Shalom Friend,

That is a complex question to answer.  If pressed, and for the sake of simplicity, I would say that the majority of the Jewish community in the United States do not hold him in high regard.  I think this is unfortunate.  It speaks to larger issues of the nature of the Jewish community in the US and other western nations.  The trend among Jews in the US is toward liberalism.  It is something that breaks my heart, if truth be known.  I am a conservative--both in my Judaism as well as my politics--and it baffles me how so many of my people turn their back on conservative values, and, by default, Israel itself.  Not to mention the Almighty, blessed be He.  Far too often the Jews in America side with Palestine rather than Israel, and it truly upsets me.

Still...I suppose I should not be overly surprised.  My people have a long history of disobedience to G-d's word.  We are blessed, we stray, He calls us back to Himself, and we grow complacent in our faith and we stray.  There is a song that I believe you have in your LDS hymnbook (although I may be mistaken) that says something to the effect of "Prone to wander, L-rd I feel it.  Prone to leave the G-d I love."  That about sums up the general consensus among American Jewry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Aish HaTorah said:

Shalom Friend,

That is a complex question to answer.  If pressed, and for the sake of simplicity, I would say that the majority of the Jewish community in the United States do not hold him in high regard.  I think this is unfortunate.  It speaks to larger issues of the nature of the Jewish community in the US and other western nations.  The trend among Jews in the US is toward liberalism.  It is something that breaks my heart, if truth be known.  I am a conservative--both in my Judaism as well as my politics--and it baffles me how so many of my people turn their back on conservative values, and, by default, Israel itself.  Not to mention the Almighty, blessed be He.  Far too often the Jews in America side with Palestine rather than Israel, and it truly upsets me.

Still...I suppose I should not be overly surprised.  My people have a long history of disobedience to G-d's word.  We are blessed, we stray, He calls us back to Himself, and we grow complacent in our faith and we stray.  There is a song that I believe you have in your LDS hymnbook (although I may be mistaken) that says something to the effect of "Prone to wander, L-rd I feel it.  Prone to leave the G-d I love."  That about sums up the general consensus among American Jewry.

Are you referring to cultural Jews?  Or are you talking also about practicing Jews tending to support progressive ideology that goes against their traditions?  I mean, is the tendency present in synagogue attenders or just those who are Jew by boodline but are not practitioners of the faith?  Do you have a theory on why this is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, anatess2 said:

Are you referring to cultural Jews?  Or are you talking also about practicing Jews tending to support progressive ideology that goes against their traditions?  I mean, is the tendency present in synagogue attenders or just those who are Jew by boodline but are not practitioners of the faith?  Do you have a theory on why this is?

Good question.  I believe that the majority of devoutly religious observant Jews in the US are still conservative in their ideology and politics.  It is primarily the secular Jew who has abandoned religious expression and embraced Liberal thinking.  I think history has the greatest part to play in this.

It seems that the easiest explanation of this phenomenon is in terms of the actual political history of the Jewish people, a history which is for the most part one of political impotence. A people whose history is largely a story of powerlessness and victimization, or at least is felt to be such, is not likely to acquire the kinds of skills necessary for astute statesmanship. Neither rabbinic nor prophetic traditions can be of much assistance in this respect, since political thinking is inherently secular thinking, so that Jewish secular thinking about politics has traditionally focused on some splendid isolated incidents of resistance and rebellion, such as the wars of the Maccabees, and the resistance against Rome. But the memory of these incidents is hardly a sufficient basis on which to ground a real tradition of political wisdom that could teach contemporary Jews how to wield power and successfully defend Jewish interests. And the absence of such a tradition of political wisdom continues to haunt all Jewish politics, including the politics of Israeli Jews, despite the fact that they now have half a century of experience in self-government.

It is interesting that a large number of Israelis approve of President Trump and his policies, while only a fraction of American Jews feel the same way.  Jews, like so many in this country, have been seduced by the clever lies and promises of the Liberal agenda.  Perhaps they want so desperately to believe that they can have a voice that they succumb to left-thinking ideology.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2019 at 2:30 PM, Aish HaTorah said:

There is a song that I believe you have in your LDS hymnbook (although I may be mistaken) that says something to the effect of "Prone to wander, L-rd I feel it.  Prone to leave the G-d I love."  That about sums up the general consensus among American Jewry.

It actually isn't in the current hymn book, but is a popular suggestion to be brought back in the next one.

https://www.thetabernaclechoir.org/articles/come-thou-fount-of-every-blessing-1985-hymnbook.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Aish HaTorah said:

Perhaps they want so desperately to believe that they can have a voice that they succumb to left-thinking ideology.

While my experience with Jews is undoubtedly less than yours, I will share what I've found with more than a few discussions with those I have known.

Basically all of them say in some way or other that they value the idea that minorities (of which Jews are numbered) are given preferential treatment.  In other words, the "left-thinking ideology" that they subscribe to is Ben's favorite word "Intersectionality".  I believe he was the one who coined the term, isn't he?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Mores said:

While my experience with Jews is undoubtedly less than yours, I will share what I've found with more than a few discussions with those I have known.

Basically all of them say in some way or other that they value the idea that minorities (of which Jews are numbered) are given preferential treatment.  In other words, the "left-thinking ideology" that they subscribe to is Ben's favorite word "Intersectionality".  I believe he was the one who coined the term, isn't he?

To my way of thinking, it is spiritual compromise of horrific proportions.  We should not seek after worldly treatment, but in all things we are to give G-d the praise and the glory.  We have a prayer that we say called the Amidah.  At the beginning, we petition HaShem to "open our lips so that our mouths may proclaim His glory."  If and when American Jews turn back to their Creator, only then will their voices be heard.  Too many mistake the covenants and promises that G-d has given to us for the perceived entitlement of preferential treatment by manmade voices and institutions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/3/2019 at 2:00 AM, Aish HaTorah said:

I found this thread up on the high shelf behind some boxes with old (and scary) prom photos.  Thought I'd dust it off and see if anyone wants to ask a few more questions..........

What would you think would be the probability of Rabbi Alon Anava being able to fit me in as a student / proselyte in spite of the fact that I recognize Rabbi Yeshua - Jesus as Messiah the Passover Lamb?

Based on the near death experience account of then fifteen year old Natan back in 2015 I am thinking that 2022 will be a big year for events in Jerusalem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now