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rondee59

Sacrament???

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I am new to the LDS church, so I do not know much about Mormon doctrine.  The missionaries said I could take Sacrament when I go into worship on Sunday.  From what I understand, I can take Sacrament at all times because I am focusing on Jesus Christ death and the Sacrament has nothing to do with me!  Can I get clarification on this?

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Just my thoughts.   The Sacrament actually does have so much to do with you.  We take the Sacrament every Sunday to renew the covenants we made at baptism.  

But it's also our way to remember Jesus Christ and to remember to keep the commandments which we have been given.  I wouldn't say that we are focusing on his death when we take the Sacrament.  We like to remember that we have a living Christ and try to keep that upfront.

So take the Sacrament if you so choose to do so.  While doing so, remember the commandments we have been given.  Even non LDS know and are familiar with the commandments that Jesus Christ and Heavenly Father have given to all of us.  LDS or non LDS.

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Hi rondee,

I'm not Mormon.  My family chooses not to take sacrament because of its significance and ties to baptism.  We wouldn't be renewing covenants because we haven't made them.  That said, Sacrament is personal and between you and God.  Members allow their unbaptized children to take it.  I would say to do what you want, just be aware of what you're doing and what it means.

What do I know though, being a heathen and all.

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3 hours ago, rondee59 said:

I am new to the LDS church, so I do not know much about Mormon doctrine.  The missionaries said I could take Sacrament when I go into worship on Sunday.  From what I understand, I can take Sacrament at all times because I am focusing on Jesus Christ death and the Sacrament has nothing to do with me!  Can I get clarification on this?

Your missionaries probably didn't want to make you feel left out.  

The fact is that we're what would be considered a "closed communion" faith.  However, no one is going to forbid you, should you reach out your hand to partake (or at least, it would be very rude for someone to do so).  However, it would be appropriate to inform you that it is not "our way" to allow non-Mormons to partake.

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1 hour ago, Carborendum said:

 However, it would be appropriate to inform you that it is not "our way" to allow non-Mormons to partake.

 

This is the first time I've ever heard that and I've discussed it with missionaries and members, to include a Counselor.

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You're get varied answers from Mormons, because it's a personal thing-- you're welcome if you want to, or can pass if you want to.  Partaking of the Sacrament serves a two fold purpose.  

- Remembering Christ and His sacrifice.  Something everyone can do

- Renewing our baptismal covenants.  Obviously only goes for people who've made baptismal covenants. 

If you're not baptized and which to partake for the first purpose, by all means go for it.  Church policy says you are welcome.  You'll also notice we have the unbaptized kids partake.  If you'd rather not partake for some reason (like Grunt's family), you're welcome to do that as well.

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19 hours ago, Grunt said:

This is the first time I've ever heard that and I've discussed it with missionaries and members, to include a Counselor.

Since the sacrament is a covenant rite, and since non-Latter-day Saints have not made that covenant, it follows that the sacrament is intended only for baptized members.

But our leaders have made it clear that it is not a desecration for non-members to partake. For example, almost all active Latter-day Saints allow and even encourage their young children to take the sacrament, despite the fact that young children cannot be baptized and are not, properly speaking, even members of the Church. As for friends and other adults investigating the Church, the feeling is that since they have not made the covenant, they are not "renewing" anything, and the sacrament is simply bread and water to them. It is generally thought better to allow partaking of the sacrament to nonmembers than to risk offending people, who might misinterpret being forbidden to take sacrament as some kind of personal moral judgment against them.

Bottom line: We obey God and the leadership he has put in place. The leadership has told us not to worry about non-members taking the sacrament. So, we don't worry about it.

The only people who actually should not take the sacrament are baptized members who have been instructed by their bishop not to take the sacrament (e.g. those who have been disfellowshipped), or who are otherwise living in defiance of their covenants. To these, partaking of the sacrament is indeed solemn mockery and works to their condemnation. It may also be that those who have been excommunicated are instructed not to partake of the sacrament, but that's only conjecture on my part.

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5 hours ago, Vort said:

Since the sacrament is a covenant rite, and since non-Latter-day Saints have not made that covenant, it follows that the sacrament is intended only for baptized members.

But our leaders have made it clear that it is not a desecration for non-members to partake. For example, almost all active Latter-day Saints allow and even encourage their young children to take the sacrament, despite the fact that young children cannot be baptized and are not, properly speaking, even members of the Church. As for friends and other adults investigating the Church, the feeling is that since they have not made the covenant, they are not "renewing" anything, and the sacrament is simply bread and water to them. It is generally thought better to allow partaking of the sacrament to nonmembers than to risk offending people, who might misinterpret being forbidden to take sacrament as some kind of personal moral judgment against them.

Bottom line: We obey God and the leadership he has put in place. The leadership has told us not to worry about non-members taking the sacrament. So, we don't worry about it.

The only people who actually should not take the sacrament are baptized members who have been instructed by their bishop not to take the sacrament (e.g. those who have been disfellowshipped), or who are otherwise living in defiance of their covenants. To these, partaking of the sacrament is indeed solemn mockery and works to their condemnation. It may also be that those who have been excommunicated are instructed not to partake of the sacrament, but that's only conjecture on my part.

That makes perfect sense.  Additionally, I wouldn't have been insulted at all if told not to participate.  I know at least one member defying her covenants, but I'm not sure if she takes Sacrament.  None of my business, really.

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23 hours ago, Jane_Doe said:

- Renewing our baptismal covenants.  Obviously only goes for people who've made baptismal covenants. 

I thought it was renewing all covenants - baptism as well as temple for those that have gone through. 

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Just now, my two cents said:

I thought it was renewing all covenants - baptism as well as temple for those that have gone through. 

Hmmm... something to think about..... *Jane just thinking out loud* the baptismal covenant is the first covenant we make, foundational for all the others.  So if the foundation is renewed, then it logically follows that everything built on top of it (such as rest of our covenants) are also renewed.  So I suppose it comes down to "same difference"?

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Non-members may have made covenants as well. It's not exclusive to Latter-day Saints  These wouldn't include temple covenants but non-members are perfectly capable of covenanting.

If the LDS sacrament doesn't apply to them, it's simply a meaningless act and no harm done.

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