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Last Sunday I taught the lesson in my Elder's Quorum meeting. We watched a video clip of Mary in the tomb and Jesus telling her to "touch me not." I asked the question, how do you think Mary felt in seeing the ressuredted Lord? Immediate a High Priest hand shot into the air and he said, "Who is the first person you want to see after you go on a long trip?" I get it, you think Mary was Jesus' wife. I responded, "There is no scriptural support that Jesus was married to Mary." His response was typical of him, "I was once sitting with Marion D. Hanks in his office in Salt Lake and we were talking about this. He said, 'We know Jesus was married, and we are pretty certain that we know who she was." 

This was followed by an Elder that said "In the Greek it does not mean 'touch me not.' It means 'embrace me not." Can I just say I am so sick of my 15 minute lesson being high-jacked by quorum members that have inside information on the "deep mysteries" of God. Please, just keep it to yourself. My calling is already stressful enough with my time always getting cut in half because of the leadership taking 15 minutes to discuss Ministering, Ministering and how we can Minister better. I don't care how fast Kolob spins on it's axis, who the angel was that showed Abraham his vision or how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. I just want to teach my abridged lesson and go home to eat lunch with my family before I have to prepare for the next day of underpaid work.

Now I know why the High Priest instructor always just gave a lecture and did not ask questions.

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1 hour ago, Emmanuel Goldstein said:

I just want to teach my abridged lesson and go home to eat lunch with my family before I have to prepare for the next day of underpaid work.

Can I just say that as a student in a lesson, this attitude is so frustrating to have in a teacher. It is so easy to see when a teacher doesn’t want to be there.

But Along with everything else you are facing, I feel your pain. I had a teacher once who only wanted to discuss the connection between temple ordinances and free masonry. No one in that room grew closer to Christ on that lesson. I feel your pain buddy.

To get away from it. I would say “oh cool! Thanks for your insight” and move on with your lesson.

On another note, how awkward would it be if you were teach Marry and Jesus were married and you get to heaven and you were wrong?

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21 hours ago, Fether said:

Can I just say that as a student in a lesson, this attitude is so frustrating to have in a teacher. It is so easy to see when a teacher doesn’t want to be there.

But Along with everything else you are facing, I feel your pain. I had a teacher once who only wanted to discuss the connection between temple ordinances and free masonry. No one in that room grew closer to Christ on that lesson. I feel your pain buddy.

To get away from it. I would say “oh cool! Thanks for your insight” and move on with your lesson.

On another note, how awkward would it be if you were teach Marry and Jesus were married and you get to heaven and you were wrong?

I want to be there, but when someone seems to only want to derail my lesson, I begin to feel like my time and the time of every other class member is being wasted. I am just sick of trying to teach a lesson and having guys like this spout out heresy as if it is doctrine. 

Edited by Emmanuel Goldstein

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2 hours ago, Emmanuel Goldstein said:

I want to be there, but when someone seems to only want to derail my lesson, I begin to feel like my time and the time of every other class member is being wasted. I am just sick of trying to teach a lesson and having guys like this spout out heresy as if it is doctrine. 

I'm sorry it's happening to you. I think all of us could be better listeners at church and show more respect to the teachers who spend a lot of their time preparing lessons for us. 

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2 hours ago, Emmanuel Goldstein said:

I want to be there, but when someone seems to only want to derail my lesson, I begin to feel like my time and the time of every other class member is being wasted. I am just sick of trying to teach a lesson and having guys like this spout out heresy as if it is doctrine. 

 

Teaching is the great calling – perhaps the greatest calling.  I have always believe the most important lesson to be taught is how to learn – the rest is just fluff to make someone feel good.  My father started out his life profession as a school teacher.  He quickly learned that regardless of how easy he made his course work – there would always be some student fail to engage and thus fail the subject to be learned.  He also discovered regardless of how difficult his course work – someone would engage and succeed.  He then observed that regardless of difficulty or simplicity – those that engage were always the same students and those that did not engage were always the same.  He wondered who was most important – the teacher or the student.

The great lesson of every missionary and teacher comes from the methods Jesus utilized in his teaching style.  In essence Jesus ignored those that did not engage.   It was not that he did not care – I believe he realized that it was pointless.  But for those that engaged – he always responded and encouraged them to take their level of engagement to a higher (better or spiritual) level.

I very much appreciate the contribution of @NeuroTypical in realizing that taking one’s engagement in church lessons to a higher level can go beyond the acquisition of data and information.  Sometimes the best way to “teach” is to inspire someone to alter what they are doing and not so much what data they are acquiring.  My father – my greatest teacher would often tell me – no one has learned anything until and unless they change something that they were doing.  The great lesson I have learned in life is that the only one that I can change when I want things to be different - is myself.

 

The Traveler

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Everyone who has been a gospel doctrine teacher, or any called teacher in the Church will have their share of people who make random comments. Learning how to deal with random comments is an aspect of charity -- the pure love of Christ.

The Church has been for many years now trying to help us as members to realize that we are not "teaching lessons" we are discussing the gospel of Jesus Christ. They have been trying to help us, inviting us, to move away from the common practice of "stand and deliver," or as your last statement says, "Now I know why the High Priest instructor always just gave a lecture and did not ask questions." This is a matter of control, and should not be the sole method of discussing the gospel of Jesus Christ. It should be used sparingly. Here is a group of verses that the Church is truly trying to help us understand:

Quote

And I give unto you a commandment that you shall teach one another the doctrine of the kingdom. Teach ye diligently and my grace shall attend you, that you may be instructed more perfectly in theory, in principle, in doctrine, in the law of the gospel, in all things that pertain unto the kingdom of God, that are expedient for you to understand; Of things both in heaven and in the earth, and under the earth; things which have been, things which are, things which must shortly come to pass; things which are at home, things which are abroad; the wars and the perplexities of the nations, and the judgments which are on the land; and a knowledge also of countries and of kingdoms— That ye may be prepared in all things when I shall send you again to magnify the calling whereunto I have called you, and the mission with which I have commissioned you. (Doctrine and Covenants 88: 77-80)

This requires more effort and study on our part and the part of the class. The called teacher and those attending the class learn how to discuss true doctrine, and from scripture we are to learn how to become more perfect in theory (Jesus's wives is a theory by which many prophets and apostles have provided thoughts on), in principle, and in many other things.  The discussion, not lesson, should have allowance to discuss the principles, doctrine, and theories that are in line with the lesson.

The example @NeuroTypical provided is important because there are individuals who want to discuss nothing related to the lesson. They just want to be heard regarding what they have been studying, and in these scenarios can be tricky, more than not they are tricky because we don't want to offend someone.

A question regarding the angel that visited Abraham isn't a bad question. If we don't know, we don't know. A similar type of question could be asking what the brother of Jared's real name is. Not everyone knows this has been answered. If we can answer the question, we answer it, especially if related to the topic of discussion. If the question or comment relates to the topic (i.e. embrace rather than touch) it can enhance learning and the spirit of the discussion.

I found more freedom and enjoyment when I have been called to teach to remember I am not teaching lessons, I am creating opportunities to discuss the lesson topics and to allow the spirit to edify the whole class.

Edited by Anddenex

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Remember, you are set apart and called.  Your job isn’t just to teach, it’s to inspire, encourage thought, AND keep the class on track.  

I have my fair share of deep doctrine talkers in my class.  I politely keep them on track.  

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23 hours ago, Grunt said:

Remember, you are set apart and called.  Your job isn’t just to teach, it’s to inspire, encourage thought, AND keep the class on track.  

I have my fair share of deep doctrine talkers in my class.  I politely keep them on track.  

I saw some guidelines mentioned in Gospel Principles:  "Never speculate about Church doctrine. Teach
only what is supported by the scriptures, the words of latter-day prophets and apostles, and the Holy Spirit
(see D&C 42:12–14; 52:9).  If you have been called to teach a quorum or class using this book, do not
substitute outside materials, however interesting they may be. Stay true to the scriptures and the words in
the book
.

Jim

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On 7/13/2018 at 7:40 PM, Anddenex said:

The Church has been for many years now trying to help us as members to realize that we are not "teaching lessons" we are discussing the gospel of Jesus Christ.

^^^ This is the key.
For years I fought against this, I just wanted to teach my lessons that I had worked so hard to prepare during the week.
Once I shifted my mind over (it took a while trust me), things became better all around. Teach as the Savior wants, not as I wanted.

I save my lecture lessons for sacrament talks now:twothumbsup:

Edited by NeedleinA

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2 hours ago, NeedleinA said:

^^^ This is the key.
For years I fought against this, I just wanted to teach my lessons that I had worked so hard to prepare during the week.
Once I shifted my mind over (it took a while trust me), things became better all around. Teach as the Savior wants, not as I wanted.

I save my lecture lessons for sacrament talks now:twothumbsup:

You and me both. :)

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