Christineanna1

How to Purify Water?

Recommended Posts

On 10/1/2018 at 4:05 AM, Christineanna1 said:

Any proven water purification methods?

There are different methods depending on what has contaminated the water.  If the water is from a mountain stream, most likely at worst it will have micro organisms which can be filtered out with a filter or can be killed by any number of chemicals.

If there is pollution in the water, it becomes more challenging.  A reverse osmosis filter may be required.  and couple that with distillation.   That can generally purify most any water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
On 10/4/2018 at 8:23 AM, Lost Boy said:

There are different methods depending on what has contaminated the water.  If the water is from a mountain stream, most likely at worst it will have micro organisms which can be filtered out with a filter or can be killed by any number of chemicals.

If there is pollution in the water, it becomes more challenging.  A reverse osmosis filter may be required.  and couple that with distillation.   That can generally purify most any water.

Water expert being pedantic:  I believe you're confusing "filtration" with "purification".

Purification is specifically is about germs.

The other items you speak of would be in the filtration and/or separation phase of water treatment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience in using river water-

1. Settle out the muds, clays and yuck- self descriptive.

2. Filter using cloth or paper filters- this removes any visible garbage or "floaters".

3. Chemically treat the water- iodine is really good for this.

4. Boil- this is not always needed, as the entire series of filters used, though looks huge (but really isn't) typically gets all livable bios out of the water.

5. Activated chacoal- removes a lot of the inorganics that filters and chemicals don't get.

6. Big Berky or Brita filters- this is the final stage before drinking.

Depending on the water and your resources, of course.  If you don't know what's wrong with the water, you're essentially a blind man in a maze.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
On 10/12/2018 at 5:31 AM, pwrfrk said:

My experience in using river water-

1. Settle out the muds, clays and yuck- self descriptive.

2. Filter using cloth or paper filters- this removes any visible garbage or "floaters".

3. Chemically treat the water- iodine is really good for this.

4. Boil- this is not always needed, as the entire series of filters used, though looks huge (but really isn't) typically gets all livable bios out of the water.

5. Activated chacoal- removes a lot of the inorganics that filters and chemicals don't get.

6. Big Berky or Brita filters- this is the final stage before drinking.

Depending on the water and your resources, of course.  If you don't know what's wrong with the water, you're essentially a blind man in a maze.

Again, a water expert offering some correction.

1. Allowing water to sit allows sludge to go to the bottom and scum to rise to the top.  Skim off the top.  Then decant the water very carefully to a clean container.
2. Paper filters are fine.  Coffee filters do a lot.  They are not as effective as chemical filter paper.  But they're a heck of a lot more expensive.
3. We don't really have commercially available chemical treatments for getting either dissolved or suspended solids out of the water. 

  • If they are available, they are incredibly expensive. 
  • Iodine serves the same purpose as chlorine.  And they are not as effective and have a lingering effect.
  • Chlorine is better.  And if you let it sit overnight in an open container, it evaporates out of the water.

4. Boiling does the same thing as iodine or chlorine.  All of these processes take time.  But chlorine is all around the best choice.
5. Activated charcoal is mainly for flavor and smell (turbidity).  But it doesn't do much for color.  It really is a poor filter.
6. Most Berky and Brita filters are simply charcoal filters.  So, that would be repeating the same thing. 

There are some models nowadays that have ceramic filters, etc. that are more expensive.  They do the job alone.  You just need to send them through a paper filter first to get the big stuff out.  You can skip the paper if you want.  But the ceramic won't last as long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/1/2018 at 2:05 AM, Christineanna1 said:

Any proven water purification methods?

There are several. Are you looking for portability or simply a backup at home if the water plant isn't keeping up.

You might look into simply bleaching your water (chlorine) or accomplishing essentially the same thing with Hydrogen Peroxide. Ultraviolet light is also often used. This was the method used when I worked at a Reverse Osmosis water bottling operation in the late nineties in combination with ozone treatment which is very similar to H2O2 treatment. Of course, as @Carborendum has mentioned you'll also still want to look into filtration along with purification. 

For a semi-portable or countertop solution I do feel the Berkey is an excellent option, but I'm not an expert. My opinion is based on reading material put out by the company and reviewing third party tests on the filters.

This link starts out with the same info you'll find on the Berkey website, but also has links to third party tests which I think are credible, but really have no way of knowing. Although the Berkey does an excellent job at cleaning out pathogens, small amounts do get through - I'd feel better taking a specific purification step for myself and my family with non-potable water.

https://www.consciouswater.ca/berkey-water-filter-test-results/

For a highly portable option of filter, I've heard really great things about the Sawyer mini which many of my acquaintances who are avid hikers really find them great to slip into a pack to allow refilling bottles at streams and so on supposedly quite safely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2018 at 7:03 PM, Carborendum said:

Again, a water expert offering some correction.

4. Boiling does the same thing as iodine or chlorine.  All of these processes take time.  But chlorine is all around the best choice.
 

Except....Water, in its natural state, very small particles suspended in it called colloids.  And colloids can cause water to have an off color and/or have a bad taste to it.

When colloids come into contact with chlorine (this happens at most water treatment facilities) it creates trihalomethanes.  And trihalomethanes are cancer causing agents.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
2 hours ago, pwrfrk said:

Except....Water, in its natural state, very small particles suspended in it called colloids.  And colloids can cause water to have an off color and/or have a bad taste to it.

When colloids come into contact with chlorine (this happens at most water treatment facilities) it creates trihalomethanes.  And trihalomethanes are cancer causing agents.

So, why suggest Iodine? It does the same thing.  Not only that, but as I mentioned, most of these compounds also evaporate our of water when exposed to air.  In factsome evaporate out faster than the chlorine.

Iodine and bromine compunds have a harder time doing that.

Edited by Guest

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now