pam

February 11 -17

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And the Jews’ passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem, And found in the temple those that sold oxen and sheep and doves, and the changers of money sitting: And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers’ money, and overthrew the tables; And said unto them that sold doves, Take these things hence; make not my Father’s house an house of merchandise.

Not exactly one of my most edifying, but absolutely one of my favorite scriptures. Our perfect Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, making a weapon and committing acts of violence against humans to make them stop doing something.    I'm not sure there's much spiritual value in talking about it on Sunday, but I can talk about it here!

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I also want to comment on the medical changes that occur at birth.  We discussed this at the kitchen table after reading Nicodemus’’ question about being born again.  

At birth, our heart is actually physicaly changed!

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Look at it closely, It is actually amazing.

http://www.embryology.ch/anglais/pcardio/umstellung02.html

 

Edited by mikbone

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On 2/12/2019 at 9:32 AM, NeuroTypical said:

Not exactly one of my most edifying, but absolutely one of my favorite scriptures. Our perfect Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, making a weapon and committing acts of violence against humans to make them stop doing something.    I'm not sure there's much spiritual value in talking about it on Sunday, but I can talk about it here!

It is also one of my favorite passages, though I find it quite edifying, particularly after understanding that, as intimated at the end of the encounter, the temple is a metaphor for the body, not just Christ's, but our own.  For me, with that understanding layers of enlightening meaning are brought to light.

For example, the clearing or cleansing of the temple  is echoed in various miracles performed thereafter by Jesus, such as driving out demons and diseases from the temples/bodies of a number of his followers.

And, if you think about it, it is not all that different from what occurs with modern medicine, where weapons (such as scalpels, anti-virus medications, sterilants, chemo therapy, etc.) are wielded violently in removing  impurities and harmful things from the body, restoring it to relative purity and good health. 

More important, though,  is how the cleansing of the temple is symbolic of the first principles and ordinances of the Gospel of Christ, most notably repentance,  where the Savior drives sin from our souls, leaving the temples of our bodies  clean and pure.  

Granted, for us, and because we continue to sin even after baptism, this cycle of the gospel is repeated throughout our lives, from beginning to end--which is interesting given that on at least one other occasion, Jesus cleanses the temple, the first at the beginning of his mortal ministry and the second at the end.

I don't think it all that coincidental that the first cleansing of the temple came close on the heals of the temptations of Christ (which all mankind will face) and the transforming of water to wine (indicative of the blood that Jesus would later shed to cleans mankind of sin), and not long before Christ's profound message about being born again of water and Spirit.  they each represent steps in the salvific process and are a witness to the verity of the Gospel and the redemptive and messianic role of Jesus,  testified to soon thereafter in his own words to the Samaritan women at the well, and finally and manifestly the source of living water flowing therefrom.

Besides, in comparison, driving the money changers from the temple and overturning the tables, was mild in comparison to what the leaders of the Jews would eventually do  to the temple of Christ's body.  Cracking a whip and overturning tables is a far cry from being repeatedly beaten, having a crown of thorns placed on Jesus'' head, nails driven through his hands and wrists and feet and hung on a cross, as well as a spear thrust into his side.

And, this, too, doesn't quite approach the anguish of his taking the sins of the world upon his sinless and pure soul--ironically a reversal of clearing the temple,  the former driving out sin, and the later taking upon him sin.

All this leads us appropriately to Jesus' prophetic declaration at the end of the temple ordeal, where he hinted that through his death and ultimate resurrection, all the temples/bodies that have be rightly cleansed by him, would be raised up to purity and glorification and eternal life, there to abide forever in the house of his Father.

Even with all that I have suggested, I trust there are many more edifying layers that could be unfolded from this amazing event. I am in awe of what may be revealed in this single Come Follow Me lesson.

Thanks, -Wade Englund-

 

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On 2/11/2019 at 12:59 PM, pam said:

I got into this lesson a few days early because I made it to the local New Glasgow Ward on Sunday February 10 ........ but I had gotten my dates mixed up so I actually was on the lesson for this week..... silly me!

I was really impressed by how this lesson was put together and how there were links there to all the scripture verses....... I was seriously impressed!!!!

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18 hours ago, wenglund said:

It is also one of my favorite passages, though I find it quite edifying, particularly after understanding that, as intimated at the end of the encounter, the temple is a metaphor for the body, not just Christ's, but our own.  

I'm glad people get such deep meaning and symbolic fulfillment from those verses, and I respect the things they take away.

For me, I'm just glad to know that sometimes the righteous action is for one human to lay a beatin' on some fools who dearly need a beatin'.  How often is the case?  Pretty much almost never.  When a human figures it's the case, they're probably more often wrong than right.  But it does happen sometimes. 

Edited by NeuroTypical

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1 hour ago, NeuroTypical said:

How often is the case?  Pretty much almost never.  When a human figures it's the case, they're probably more often wrong than right.  But it does happen sometimes. 

Elder Holland comments on that :)

“I can honestly say (and I’m embarrassed to say it) that I can hardly think of anything I have ever done
in anger that I did not live to regret. There is probably righteous indignation, but usually it’s just indignation. Maybe this rule is good enough: If you ever find anyone changing money in the temple, you can get mad (laughter). That seems to be an acceptable reason. But short of that, be careful. Bite your tongue. Count to 50 and try again. Because that’s what the Savior did. I think we’ve
overplayed the cleansing of the temple as an example of Christ’s “other side.” It does show how a God feels about sacred things, but the anger was an exception, not the rule.”

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The usual opinion is that you can't do violence without being angry.  I know that's not the case.  And the scriptural account is silent about Christ's emotional state.

Quote

And the Jews’ passover was at hand, and Jesus went up to Jerusalem, And found in the temple those that sold oxen and sheep and doves, and the changers of money sitting: And when he had made a scourge of small cords, he drove them all out of the temple, and the sheep, and the oxen; and poured out the changers’ money, and overthrew the tables; And said unto them that sold doves, Take these things hence; make not my Father’s house an house of merchandise.

Here's my one single example of doing righteous violence:  We had two adolescent dogs, a white American Bulldog and a grey Mastiff.  They were fighting once.  Like, a lot.  Wife and I moved in to break them apart, but the bulldog had the mastiff by the throat and was starting to shake.  The fight was over, grey had lost, but white wasn't letting go.  My wife was banging pans together inches away from white's ears to distract her.  I was straddling white and trying to get her to let go.  Quite a lot of chaos for a little kitchen.  Nothing was working - grey was in danger of serious hurt or death.  I started yelling and beating white, hoping to get her attention.  I remember there was no anger at all.  I was worried about grey, and I remember being solely focused on measuring my blows so she might notice, but I wouldn't move her head and worsen the bite into a tear.  I was actually feeling a bit tenderhearted as I wailed away - so desperately hoping she would just let go, so I could take her away and start praising her for letting go.  Grey's whines were more pitiful and weaker every ten seconds that went by, what we could hear over all the shouting/pan banging/growling.  I kept thinking "my poor grey, she might die.  My poor white - if she gets a thirst for blood we might have to put her down."  Concerned love.  While I was doing violence. 

I then changed my tactics, because nothing we were doing was phasing our stubbornheaded Bulldog.  I took her collar and cut off her air supply.  Eventually her jaw relaxed as she almost passed out.  The millisecond that wife got grey away, I loosed the collar and got between the two dogs, talking softly to white, petting her head, offering a reassuring voice as I made her look me in the eyes.  I remember later being surprised at how much chaos and violence and adrenalin was happening, but the closest I got to angry was just increasing frustration and desperation.  

So yeah, I know violence can happen in the absence of anger or other negative emotions.  I don't know if Jesus was ticked off or not, I can surely see He might not have been.  Or he might have been extremely angry.  I dunno. 

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...the anger was an exception, not the rule.

Absolutely.  I'd also say that violence is the exception, not the rule.   Here I am approaching 50, and there's one single time where violence was warranted in my entire life.

Edited by NeuroTypical

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6 hours ago, NeuroTypical said:

I'm glad people get such deep meaning and symbolic fulfillment from those verses, and I respect the things they take away.

For me, I'm just glad to know that sometimes the righteous action is for one human to lay a beatin' on some fools who dearly need a beatin'.  How often is the case?  Pretty much almost never.  When a human figures it's the case, they're probably more often wrong than right.  But it does happen sometimes. 

Yes, it is not uncommon for people to miss the intended messages in Christ's actions and words, and either take things too far or not far enough or in the wrong direction. 

I suppose it is part of being imperfect humans, particularly the inclination to focus on the sensational at the expense of the subtle and yet profound. ;)

Thanks, -Wade Englund-

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