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Iggy

DNA testing

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Ancestry is offering their DNA testing for $30.00 off, that is $69.00 folks. Today is the deadline. Oh, if you don't like Ancestry - ALL of the others are offering theirs at discounts too.
I purchased two kits for Hubby and myself - this years birthday gifts - will update with the results.

I went with Ancestry because both Hubby and I have accounts with FamilySearch & Ancestry and a good chunk of my relatives (who are not LDS) also belong to Ancestry and three of them have FamilySearch & Famicity accounts. I am hoping that there will be distant *Cousins* on Hubby's side who have Ancestry accounts and if there are any who have FamilySearch accounts we will be Over The Moon!

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I am trying to connect with living relatives - some of which hasn't been that hard really. What is hard is getting them to cut loose with the family stories/lore. If only I had the money to travel to them armed with a good tape recorder, camera, and camcorder even, and hundreds of $$ worth of blank tapes.

I would even pay for a kit for my surviving brother to take the test so that I can get some DNA information on our Dad's line. BUT, he is still avoiding me because of some past childhood hurt he encountered and blames me for. I wasn't there - so it wasn't me. His son could take the test, but I would rather it be just my brother.

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I am such a conspiracy theorist that I am amazed people voluntarily send their personal information complete with DNA to an outfit for them to use however they see fit...

But don't worry, I'm not so wack that I go to all lengths to keep myself anonymous on the internet.  :D

 

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Ancestry doesn't do that. As for personal information - my mailing address is not personal. Besides, neither Husband nor I have any skeletons in our own closet to worry about, and we are actually looking for ALL of the family skeleton's AND their stories.

I do not put out our real names, pinpoint our actual physical address via internet forums, so, in that, I am a wack.

The God-given gift of discernment I have has indicated that Ancestry can be trusted. I stand on that. 

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My husband and I both used Ancestry for our DNA analysis. It’s so interesting. My youngest sister also did hers through Ancestry and it’s fascinating to see how different we are, yet Ancestry was able to connect us as siblings.

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I did it because I don't know my father, so I am interested in finding info about that side of my family. So far, NASA, all the relatives are from my mom's side. I do have two friends-from my ward and stake- that were adopted and found their bio families and had happy reunions though. 

Beyond that I learned that I am a European Mutt, mostly from England. I can call myself Irish though, and about 2% Jewish so that tickles me.

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5 hours ago, Iggy said:

Ancestry doesn't do that. As for personal information - my mailing address is not personal. Besides, neither Husband nor I have any skeletons in our own closet to worry about, and we are actually looking for ALL of the family skeleton's AND their stories.

I do not put out our real names, pinpoint our actual physical address via internet forums, so, in that, I am a wack.

The God-given gift of discernment I have has indicated that Ancestry can be trusted. I stand on that. 

My understanding is that what often happens is that law enforcement sends a sample of DNA to Ancestry just as any other customer would, asking to be connected (as any customer can) with other Ancestry customers who are probably related (as those folks themselves have agreed).  From there it’s a simple matter to begin talking to relatives of the DNA source, build out the family tree, figure out who lives where, and identify your suspect with enough probability to get a warrant and/or bring the guy in for questioning.  Offer him a drink of water water, swab his saliva from the discarded cup/bottle, get a match, and there’s your conviction.  

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2 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

My understanding is that what often happens is that law enforcement sends a sample of DNA to Ancestry just as any other customer would, asking to be connected (as any customer can) with other Ancestry customers who are probably related.....

According to a YouTube video I watched, they caught a serial killer that way.

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2 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

My understanding is that what often happens is that law enforcement sends a sample of DNA to Ancestry just as any other customer would, asking to be connected (as any customer can) with other Ancestry customers who are probably related (as those folks themselves have agreed).  From there it’s a simple matter to begin talking to relatives of the DNA source, build out the family tree, figure out who lives where, and identify your suspect with enough probability to get a warrant and/or bring the guy in for questioning.  Offer him a drink of water water, swab his saliva from the discarded cup/bottle, get a match, and there’s your conviction.  

I am okay with that like I said - Husband and I don't have any skeletons in the closet.

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11 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

My understanding is that what often happens is that law enforcement sends a sample of DNA to Ancestry just as any other customer would, asking to be connected (as any customer can) with other Ancestry customers who are probably related (as those folks themselves have agreed).  From there it’s a simple matter to begin talking to relatives of the DNA source, build out the family tree, figure out who lives where, and identify your suspect with enough probability to get a warrant and/or bring the guy in for questioning.  Offer him a drink of water water, swab his saliva from the discarded cup/bottle, get a match, and there’s your conviction.  

 

8 hours ago, Iggy said:

I am okay with that like I said - Husband and I don't have any skeletons in the closet.

That's not the only thing they can do.

Basically, Ancestry now OWNS your DNA sample and can do whatever they want to do with it.  For example - and I'm just pulling this off the fringes of my brain - it can use your DNA sample to give to a research outfit that is working on a biological weapon to wipe out your entire family tree.  This is most especially a concern to Jews because they have had that specific experience of people trying to wipe them out of the face of the earth.

But, in the case of convictions - relative DNA has big DNA marker commonality such that, a relative of yours - including distant ones - that have specifically avoided giving DNA samples can now be identified by your DNA sample.  So, you may be free with your closet but that doesn't mean your relative wants his closet opened even if he doesn't have skeletons in it either.  Having grown up in a political family, I know for a fact that the lack of skeletons in one's closet doesn't mean it will be skeleton free when someone opens it.  There are a lot of reasons somebody would contrive to put a skeleton in there.  Especially with what we now know about Fake News and the seedy activities of Intelligence Agencies.

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38 minutes ago, anatess2 said:

 

That's not the only thing they can do.

Basically, Ancestry now OWNS your DNA sample and can do whatever they want to do with it.  For example - and I'm just pulling this off the fringes of my brain - it can use your DNA sample to give to a research outfit that is working on a biological weapon to wipe out your entire family tree.  This is most especially a concern to Jews because they have had that specific experience of people trying to wipe them out of the face of the earth.

But, in the case of convictions - relative DNA has big DNA marker commonality such that, a relative of yours - including distant ones - that have specifically avoided giving DNA samples can now be identified by your DNA sample.  So, you may be free with your closet but that doesn't mean your relative wants his closet opened even if he doesn't have skeletons in it either.  Having grown up in a political family, I know for a fact that the lack of skeletons in one's closet doesn't mean it will be skeleton free when someone opens it.  There are a lot of reasons somebody would contrive to put a skeleton in there.  Especially with what we now know about Fake News and the seedy activities of Intelligence Agencies.

There are less-dire concerns, too; like whether one’s DNA constitutes “intellectual property”.  If I have a genetic marker that makes me immune to—say—prostate cancer, and Ancestry sells my DNA sequence to a lab that manages to replicate it and use it to develop a vaccine that makes millions—shouldn’t I be compensated? 

Edited by Just_A_Guy

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3 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

There are less-dire concerns, too; like whether one’s DNA constitutes “intellectual property”.  If I have a genetic marker that makes me immune to—say—prostate cancer, and Ancestry sells my DNA sequence to a lab that manages to replicate it and use it to develop a vaccine that makes millions—shouldn’t I be compensated? 

 

4 hours ago, anatess2 said:

 

That's not the only thing they can do.

Basically, Ancestry now OWNS your DNA sample and can do whatever they want to do with it.  For example - and I'm just pulling this off the fringes of my brain - it can use your DNA sample to give to a research outfit that is working on a biological weapon to wipe out your entire family tree.  This is most especially a concern to Jews because they have had that specific experience of people trying to wipe them out of the face of the earth.

But, in the case of convictions - relative DNA has big DNA marker commonality such that, a relative of yours - including distant ones - that have specifically avoided giving DNA samples can now be identified by your DNA sample.  So, you may be free with your closet but that doesn't mean your relative wants his closet opened even if he doesn't have skeletons in it either.  Having grown up in a political family, I know for a fact that the lack of skeletons in one's closet doesn't mean it will be skeleton free when someone opens it.  There are a lot of reasons somebody would contrive to put a skeleton in there.  Especially with what we now know about Fake News and the seedy activities of Intelligence Agencies.

Both of you enough of your *The Sky Is Falling* nonsense.  Neither one of you even went to Ancestry dot com to research what they do and do NOT do with the DNA information. I did. Before I even purchased the DNA kits. 

@Just_A_Guy I actually expected more from you. Such as Due Diligence.

Quote

From  https://www.ancestrydna.com/kits/?s_kwcid=ancestors+dna&gclid=Cj0KCQjw2IrmBRCJARIsAJZDdxCgAe3WsjHRdk7u58kaw7k312IcLVGV4fAO7IPp1UH-dveWYV3YNF0aAhPKEALw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds&o_xid=79108&o_lid=79108&o_sch=Paid+Search+Non+Brand 

Your privacy is important to us. We use industry standard security practices to store your DNA sample, your DNA test results, and other personal data you provide to us. In addition, we store your DNA test results and DNA sample without your name or other common identifying information. You own your DNA data. At any time, you can choose to download raw DNA data, have us delete your DNA test results as described in the AncestryDNA Privacy Statement, or have us destroy your physical DNA saliva sample. We do not share with third parties your name or other common identifying information linked to your genetic data, except as legally required or with your explicit consent.

For more information on privacy at AncestryDNA, see the AncestryDNA Privacy Statement and visit our Privacy Center.

 

And just because you BOTH really pissed me off, here is AncestryDNA Privacy Statement in its ENTIRETY.

Quote
 
 

Your Privacy

 

At Ancestry, your privacy is a top priority. Ancestry is committed to being a good steward of your Personal Information, handling it in a responsible manner, and securing it with administrative, technical, and physical safeguards.

We also believe in being honest, direct and transparent when it comes to your data. Ancestry follows three guiding principles when it comes to your privacy:

  • Transparency. We work hard to be transparent about what Personal Information we collect and process.
  • Simplicity. We try to use easy-to-understand language to describe our privacy practices to help you make informed choices.
  • Control. We give you control over the Personal Information you provide to us, including your DNA Data, and how it is used, shared, and retained.

 

Other Important Things for You to Understand When You Use Our Services

You always maintain ownership of your DNA and DNA Data—you can manage and delete it as described in this Statement.

You may discover unexpected facts about yourself or your family when using our services. Once discoveries are made, we can’t undo them.

When you make new discoveries with us, you should feel confident and informed about how we use your Personal Information. Our full Privacy Statement is below and we encourage you to read it.

 

Effective Date: April 30, 2018

 

1.  Introduction

At Ancestry, we enable journeys of self-discovery. As a result, we collect, process and store your Personal Information as you use our websites, mobile applications, and services (collectively the “Services”). Personal Information is information that can identify you, such as your name, email or street address, or it may be information that could reasonably be linked back to you, including your Genetic Information. This Privacy Statement describes our practices for collecting, storing and processing your Personal Information and the controls we provide you to manage it within our Services. In addition, we have a Cookie Policy that describes our use of browser cookies and similar tracking technologies which is considered a part of this Privacy Statement.

 

2.  Account Creation and Your Engagement with Ancestry Services

The Personal Information required to create a basic Ancestry account is only your name, an email address, and a password. Access to Ancestry records to help you build a family tree, or to our DNA features (ethnicity estimate, etc.) requires additional personal information, including payment details, and, for the DNA test, the test code (when you activate your DNA test kit) and a saliva sample from which we can extract Genetic Information.

Account creation also requires you to agree to the Ancestry Terms and Conditions and this Privacy Statement by clicking “Continue” on the account creation page.

By clicking “Continue,” you are telling us that you consent to Ancestry collecting, processing, and sharing your Personal Information (including your Genetic Information if you have taken the AncestryDNA test) as described in this Privacy Statement and in any other documents referenced in this Privacy Statement.

At any time, you can request Ancestry delete information you have uploaded into your account, such as a family tree or your Genetic Information. Please see Section 10 for specific details about deleting your data.

If you no longer wish to have an Ancestry account, please go to your Account Settings and request that your account be deleted.

 

3.  What Information Does Ancestry Collect From You?

The table below describes the information we collect from you to provide the Services. In this Privacy Statement, we refer to this as your “Personal Information.”

Information category Use Description
Account Information
  • Your name
  • An email address
  • A password that you provide us when you create an Ancestry account
  • A mobile phone number that you may voluntarily provide so we can notify you of DNA test result status, or when you contact Ancestry Member Services
Credit Card/Payment Information
  • Payment information, such as your credit card number, and your billing and shipping address(es), when you purchase something from Ancestry, such as an Ancestry subscription or a DNA test kit.
DNA Kit Activation Information When you activate a DNA test kit, we collect
  • Your DNA test kit code
  • Your sex
  • Your year of birth
Profile Information
  • We collect the information that you provide when you voluntarily create a user profile. This information may be seen by other Ancestry users.
  • Additional personal details that you provide in your profile (for example, a profile image, your name, age, location, etc.), will be visible to other Ancestry users.
User Provided Content
  • Information you provide about yourself or other living individuals when you voluntarily contribute to the Services, or participate in community discussions.
  • For example, you might contribute details (stories, images) about you or other users’ family trees, annotate Ancestry content or records.
  • Information about deceased persons is not Personal Information under this Privacy Statement.
Genetic Information
  • We extract your DNA from your saliva at one of our partner laboratories when you send it back to us in the tube provided with your AncestryDNA test kit.
  • We convert your DNA into machine-readable code (“DNA Data”), which is used to provide you an ethnicity estimate. Your DNA Data is also used to provide other information about you, such as your connection to genetic relatives in our database and any genetic
  • associated with physical traits, such as hair color or traits associated with your health and wellness.
  • A note about your DNA and Saliva: Once our laboratory partner has produced your DNA Data, the DNA and saliva (also referred to as “biological samples”) are stored so that they can be available for future testing. Future testing may be done if you agree to our Informed Consent for Research or if you otherwise consent to future testing of your biological sample. Sections 8 and 10 below describe how you can control both your DNA Data and your biological samples.
Social Media Information If you use Facebook to log into Ancestry Services, we collect information from your Facebook profile that you choose to provide to us (for example your Facebook profile information).
Additional User Information Information that you provide to us when you answer email surveys or online questionnaires offered through the Services.
Your Communications Your 1:1 communications with other Ancestry users through our communications features, as well as information you provide in communications with Ancestry Member Services.
Contests and Promotions Personal Information when you voluntarily participate in contests and special promotions we run through our Services.

 

4.  What Information Does Ancestry Collect Through Your Use of the Services?

Information category Use Description
Computer and Mobile Device Information

Information about how you access our Services, including the website you visited before and after Ancestry’s site.

The Internet protocol (“IP”) address of your computer, mobile device, or the proxy server that you use to access the Internet, in addition to other technical information, such as:

  • Your computer operating system, and
  • Your web browser.
  • Your mobile device identifier provided by your mobile device operating system and your mobile operating system.
  • The name of your internet service provider or mobile carrier.
Information from Cookies and similar technologies Cookies and similar technologies as described in our Cookie Policy. Please refer to our cookie policy to learn about our practices and the controls we provide you.
Information shared through social media features

If you interact with social media through the Services, for example “Like,” “Tweet,” “Pin,” or “Follow Us” links to sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and YouTube, Ancestry will collect these interactions and whatever account information these services make available to us.

Your interactions with these features are governed by the privacy statement of the applicable third party company.

Information from your use of the Services Information about your use of the Services, such as when you search or access records or public family trees, which pages you view or links you click on, or when you add people to your tree, etc.

 

5.  Information We Collect From Other Sources

Information category Use Description
Information from Public and Historical Records Ancestry collects records from various sources, usually from official record sources, including newspapers, as well as birth, death, and marriage records, which may contain Personal Information relating to you. These records are generally part of Ancestry’s subscription Services.
Information from Third Parties

We may also receive information about you from third parties. For example, we may supplement the data we collect with demographic information licensed from third parties in order to personalize the Services and our offers to you.

If you purchase a gift subscription, we will collect Personal Information to complete the gift and notify the recipient.

 

6.  How does Ancestry use your Personal Information?

Information category Use Description
Personal Information (generally) We use your Personal Information to provide, personalize, improve, update and expand our Services. This includes:
  • Authenticating your access to the Services and improving Ancestry information security;
  • Processing your payments for subscriptions, AncestryDNA services and test kits, and other premium products and features;
  • Building new and improving existing products and Services;
  • Helping you create, and providing insights about, your family trees based on data in Ancestry’s databases;
  • Issuing surveys and questionnaires to collect Additional User Information for use in the Services, as well as facilitating product development and research initiatives;
  • Conducting scientific, statistical, and historical research; and
  • Detecting and protecting against error, fraud, or other criminal or malicious activity and enforcing our Terms and Conditions.
Communications We use your Personal Information to communicate with you about the Services, such as when we:
  • Respond to your inquiries to Member Services;
  • Alert you to potential relatives identified by DNA matching, or through our family history services (for example, “Hints” about potential ancestors in our database);
  • Alert you to records pertaining to people in your family tree or to whom you may be related;
  • Inform you of product changes or new products and services;
  • Ask you to participate in Ancestry media productions or testimonials; and,
  • Provide you with information or request action in response to technical, security, and other operational issues.
Market new products and offers from us or our business partners. We use your Personal Information to market new products and offers from us or our business partners. This includes advertising personalized to you based on your interests.

Note: You can control how we market to you by using the unsubscribe link in any email you receive, by changing your account preferences, or by following the instructions in any other marketing communications you receive; for more information please see our Cookie Policy.

Genetic Information Ancestry uses your Genetic Information for the following primary purposes:
  • Delivering ethnicity results,
  • (e.g., close relatives or distant cousins) from our database, and other information to help you learn more about yourself, your relatives and genetic family groups;
  • Connecting you with your relatives in our database through features such as DNA matching or other product features;
  • Providing you other insights into what your DNA reveals about traits, personal health and wellness; we may also invite you to participate in surveys and questionnaires (entirely optional) based on your DNA data.
  • Providing relevant results to assist you in discovering common ancestors and other details about your family history, as well as helping you connect with friends and family;
  • Studying aggregated Genetic Information to better understand population and ethnicity-related health, wellness, aging, or physical conditions;
  • Conducting scientific, statistical, and historical research; and,
  • Improving features and functionality in our existing DNA-related products, enhancing the customer experience across Ancestry products, improving the quality of our laboratory processes and technology, and building new products and services, including services related to personal health and wellness.

We will seek additional consent from you before we collect and process additional sensitive Personal Information (for example, health history) as part of your interaction with the Services.

 

7.  When Do We Share Your Information and Who are the Recipients?

Ancestry does not share your individual Personal Information (including your Genetic Information) with third-parties without your additional consent other than as described in this Privacy Statement. In particular, we will not share your Genetic Information with insurance companies, employers, or third-party marketers without your express consent. The circumstances described below explain when sharing might occur:

People with whom your Information may be shared / Circumstances in which sharing might occur Description
Other Ancestry Users or others you may choose to share with

Any information you add to your Ancestry profile may be seen by other Ancestry users, as will public family tree details (we do not show living people in your tree to other users without your permission), and DNA matches (when you choose to see and be seen by your DNA matches).

If you share details of your family history or DNA experience outside the Services, you do so at your own risk.

Service Providers

We use other companies to help us provide the Services to you. As a result, these partner companies will have some of your information in their systems. Our partners are subject to contractual obligations governing data security and confidentiality consistent with this Privacy Statement and applicable laws.

These processing partners include our:

  • Laboratory partners;
  • DNA test shipping providers;
  • Payment processors;
  • Cloud services infrastructure providers;
  • Biological sample storage facilities;
  • Vendors that assist us in marketing; analytics, and fraud prevention; and,
  • Some Member Services functions.
Research Partners We share your Genetic Information with research partners only when you provide us with your express consent to do so through our Informed Consent to Research.

Research partners may include commercial or non-profit organizations that conduct or support scientific research, the development of therapeutics, medical devices or related material to treat, diagnose or predict health conditions. In some circumstances, a research partner or Ancestry may have a financial interest in the research arrangement. A list of our research partners can be found here.

Legal or Regulatory Process We may share your Personal Information if we believe it is reasonably necessary to:
  • Comply with valid legal process (e.g., subpoenas, warrants);
  • Enforce or apply the Ancestry Terms and Conditions;
  • Protect the security or integrity of the Services; or
  • Protect the rights, property, or safety, of Ancestry, our employees or users.

If we are compelled to disclose your Personal Information to law enforcement, we will do our best to provide you with advance notice, unless we are prohibited under the law from doing so. In the interest of transparency, Ancestry produces a Transparency Report where we list the number of valid law enforcement requests for user data across all our sites.

If Ancestry is Acquired If Ancestry or its businesses are acquired or transferred (including in connection with bankruptcy or similar proceedings), we will share your Personal Information with the acquiring or receiving entity. The promises in this Privacy Statement will continue to apply to your Personal Information that is transferred to the new entity.
A note about aggregated data Ancestry may disclose user information in an aggregated form as part of the Services or our marketing, or in scientific publications published by us or our research partners. For example, we might note the percentage of immigrants in a State that are from a particular geographic region or country. Such disclosure will never include Personal Information.

 

8.  Your Choices and Access to Your Personal Information

Subject to certain exceptions, you have a right to request access to your Personal Information and to be provided with a copy of certain information you provided in a portable form, as well as to seek to update, delete or correct this information by using the tools described below or by contacting Ancestry. Details and options for accessing this information are listed below.

Type Choices
Ancestry You can access and update the Personal Information (such as your email address, username, profile information, etc.) that you provide to Ancestry at any time in the following sections of the privacy settings: To learn how to manage the privacy settings for any family trees you have created on Ancestry, you can click here.
Related Brands Ancestry strives to make it simple for you to manage your privacy across the Services. You can manage your privacy settings for our related brands by clicking on the following links:
Mobile You can also control your information using the settings available in Ancestry’s mobile applications, such as the Ancestry, AncestryDNA or “We’re Related” apps.
Advertising If you do not want us to use data about your interests or behaviors to serve you targeted ads, you may change your settings as described in our Cookie Policy. For information on
please see our Cookie Policy.
Family Tree Information Download Ancestry allows you to download your family tree information in the standard GEDCOM family tree file format in your Family Tree Settings.
Genetic Information Download Your DNA Data belongs to you. You always have the option of downloading a file with your DNA Data. Learn how here. For more information on what is included in your DNA Data download, go here.

 

9.  What are Ancestry’s retention practices?

Ancestry services are fundamentally premised on the notion that the personal voyage of self-discovery is not a one-time event and continues over lengthy periods of time—possibly lifetimes. Additionally, and with particular regard to our subscribers and DNA customers who pay fees or purchase subscriptions, the ongoing enhancement of Ancestry’s historical records and DNA features provide benefits and insights to our users over time. As a result, Ancestry’s retention practices reflect this ongoing value by retaining user accounts on our system until our users inform us of their desire to delete their data or close their accounts.

Category of Information Retention Period
Account Ancestry will retain the Personal Information you provide while creating your account until such time as you ask us to close it.
Family Tree Due to the multi-generational significance of family trees, Ancestry will retain your family tree data as needed to provide you with continuous access, updated features, and the ability to enhance your family tree.
DNA Ancestry retains your DNA data as needed to provide you with the features and functionality you purchased (or were gifted), including continuously updated features such as DNA matches, increasingly granular ethnicity estimates and improved origins/migration details, as well as new other features based on your DNA data.
Related Brands Ancestry’s related brands (Fold3, Newspapers.com,etc.) have their own account logins and will retain your account as needed to provide you with continuous and updated Services. You can delete these accounts at any time.
Usage Information In some cases we choose to retain usage information (e.g., visits to sites) in a depersonalized or aggregated form. Once aggregated, this information ceases to be personal and will not be subject to Ancestry user deletion requests.

 

10.  How can I delete my Personal Information?

You can delete your Personal Information from Ancestry in a number of ways.

Information Category How to delete
Personal Information

You can delete your Personal Information from Ancestry by logging into your Account Settings.

To the extent you have shared information through the Services (for example, by making your family trees public, or by sharing your DNA Results directly with other users), Ancestry will not be able to remove any copies of information that other Ancestry members may have retained.

Please direct any request to remove information from linked archival records to the responsible archival entity.

We will consider requests for removal of Personal Information from the searchable indexes of the records we hold on a case-by-case basis in accordance with law.

If you have shared content with others either directly or by making your family tree details available to other Ancestry members, some of your Personal Information may have been copied to other Ancestry members’ family trees, which can only be removed by contacting the other Ancestry member and asking them to delete it.

Genetic Note: If you request that Ancestry delete your DNA Data, we will delete all Genetic Information, including any derivative Genetic Information (ethnicity estimates, genetic relative matches, etc.) from our production, development, analytics, and research systems within 30 days.

To request the destruction of your biological samples, you must contact Member Services. Please note that if you have agreed to our Informed Consent to Research, we will not be able to remove your Genetic Information from active or completed research projects, but we will not use it for any new research projects.

General Please note that there may be some latency in deleting your Personal Information from our backup systems after it has been deleted from our production, development, analytics, and research systems. Also, our laboratory partners may retain information they receive from us in order to comply with laws or regulations that may require them to do so, such as the Clinical Laboratory Improvements Amendments regulations administered by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Ancestry may also retain certain information as reasonably necessary to comply with our legal obligations (including law enforcement requests), resolve disputes, maintain security, prevent fraud and abuse, as well as to comply with tax, payment industry, securities, and clinical regulatory compliance requirements.

 

11.  Security

Ancestry maintains a comprehensive information security program designed to protect our customers’ Personal Information using administrative, physical, and technical safeguards.

The specific security measures used are based on the sensitivity of the Personal Information collected. We have measures in place to protect against inappropriate access, loss, misuse, or alteration of Personal Information (including Genetic Information) under our control.

Ancestry’s Security Team regularly reviews our security and privacy practices and enhances them as necessary to help ensure the integrity of our systems and your Personal Information.

We use secure server software to encrypt Personal Information (including Genetic Information), and we only partner with security companies that meet and commit to our security standards. While we cannot guarantee that loss, misuse or alteration of data will not occur, we use reasonable efforts to prevent this.

It is also important for you to guard against unauthorized access to your Personal Information by maintaining strong passwords and protecting against the unauthorized use of your own computer or device.

 

12.  Data Transfer

Any transfer of your Personal and Genetic Information between Ancestry’s Ireland-based company and Ancestry’s U.S.-based company for processing in the United States is conducted pursuant to established transfer mechanisms such as Standard Contractual

.

You can request a copy of any standard contractual clauses relating to your Personal Information that we may have executed by contacting us using the details below.

 

13.  Changes to this Statement

We may modify this Privacy Statement at any time, but we will provide prominent advance notice of any material changes to this Statement, such as posting a notice through the Services, on our websites, or sending you an email, to provide you the opportunity to review the changes and choose whether to continue using the Services.

We will also notify you of non-material changes to this Statement as of their effective date by posting a notice through the Services, on our websites, or sending you an email. Your continued use of our Services after notice of non-material changes means that you consent to the updated Privacy Statement.

If you object to any changes, you may delete your account through your Account Settings.

 

14.  California’s Shine the Light Law

California Civil Code Section 1798.83, known as the “Shine the Light” law, permits Users who are California residents to request and obtain from us a list of what Personal Information (if any) we disclosed to third parties for their direct marketing purposes in the preceding calendar year and the names and addresses of those third parties. Requests may be made only once a year and are free of charge. Under Section 1798.83, Ancestry currently does not share any Personal Information with third parties for their own direct marketing purposes.

 

15.  Legal basis under EU General Data Protection Regulation for processing personal information of EU residents.

Where you have consented to data processing, your consent provides the legal basis to process your Personal Information. We rely on your explicit consent to process your Genetic Information. You have the right to withdraw consent at any time. Please note that your withdrawal of consent to collect and process your Personal Information will not affect the lawfulness of processing your Personal Information based on your consent before you withdrew your consent.

We may also process your Personal Information on the basis of contractual necessity to perform a contract we have with you. For example, we process your credit card details when you provide them in order to use our Services or purchase access to premium features such as our DNA testing services.

We may also process your Personal Information on the basis of our legitimate interests, including in providing and improving the Services. For example, Ancestry has a legitimate interest in understanding your login history so we can assess your interaction with our Services. We also have a legitimate interest in providing and developing interesting features to provide to our users. We use your Personal Information to keep our Services safe and secure and we do so as it necessary to pursue your and our legitimate interests in ensuring that our Services are secure, and to protect against fraud, spam and abuse.

Where we rely on legitimate interests to process your Personal Information, you have the right to object to such processing (meaning that you can ask us to stop). You can use your Privacy Settings to control certain ways in which we process your data. You can also contact us, using the details below, to object to other forms of processing.

 

16.  Identity and Contact Details of the Data

If you reside in the United States, Ancestry.com Operations Inc. and Ancestry.com DNA, LLC are responsible for the use of your data and for responding to any requests related to your Personal Information.

If you reside outside the United States, Ancestry Ireland Unlimited Company is your data controller.

Contact information for these entities is listed at the bottom of this Statement.

Users outside of the United States may contact the Irish Data Protection Commission, or your local Data Protection Authority.

Contact Details of the

Ancestry members can reach us using these phone numbers, or you may submit questions using this web form.

Official correspondence must be sent via postal mail to:

For members located in the United States For members located outside of the United States

Ancestry.com Operations Inc.

Attn: Privacy Office
153 Townsend Street, Suite 800
San Francisco, CA 94107

 

Ancestry Ireland Unlimited Company

Attn: Privacy Office
52-55 Sir John Rogerson’s Quay
Dublin D02 NA07
Ireland

 

 
21

 

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@Iggy, thanks for posting that.  

@anatess2 can speak for herself; but that statement doesn’t appear to rule out the law enforcement scenario I noted; and at any rate, they explicitly say they will comply with subpoenas.  

As for medical research—it’s awesome that they don’t release the genetic sequence itself without the informed consent form, but I note that the consent form explicitly says the donor will *not* be compensated for their sample or any benefits derived therefrom.  So users of the service still need to be aware that if they sign that “informed consent” form, they are basically paying for the right to give a commercial lab the opportunity to make thousands or millions of dollars off the donor’s DNA.  It’s basically like buying $99 worth of lottery tickets and then giving them all away.  

Lots of folks will probably be happy to do that, whether for the warmth of knowing they’ve “advanced science” or for the thrill of the insight they’re getting into their family trees.  And that’s fine—as long as they understand the issues involved.  

By the way—for my “due diligence”, you now owe me $150 in legal fees. You can pay me in root beer, as @pam will attest. ;) 

Edited by Just_A_Guy

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50 minutes ago, Just_A_Guy said:

By the way—for my “due diligence”, you now owe me $150 in legal fees. You can pay me in root beer

Do you have a preference as to whether your fees are paid in a lot of off-brand root beer or less of the artisanal stuff? Just in case I am ever in need of your services.

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6 minutes ago, SilentOne said:

Do you have a preference as to whether your fees are paid in a lot of off-brand root beer or less of the artisanal stuff? Just in case I am ever in need of your services.

I’m not that hoity-toity.  Anything without caffeine will do just fine.  ;) 

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5 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

By the way—for my “due diligence”, you now owe me $150 in legal fees. You can pay me in root beer, as @pam will attest. ;) 

 

So sorry, I did not ask you to do that for me. It was for your own information. I already read it and was totally fine with it.

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11 hours ago, Iggy said:

 

Both of you enough of your *The Sky Is Falling* nonsense.  Neither one of you even went to Ancestry dot com to research what they do and do NOT do with the DNA information. I did. Before I even purchased the DNA kits. 

@Just_A_Guy I actually expected more from you. Such as Due Diligence.

And just because you BOTH really pissed me off, here is AncestryDNA Privacy Statement in its ENTIRETY.

 

Quite an accusation there, Iggy.  I don't make statements without basis.

It's not my responsibility if you get pissed off by MY OPINION.

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5 hours ago, Iggy said:

So sorry, I did not ask you to do that for me. It was for your own information. I already read it and was totally fine with it.

And I read it a few years ago and I'm not fine with it.  We can have different stances on things you know.

Edited by anatess2

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6 hours ago, anatess2 said:

Quite an accusation there, Iggy.  I don't make statements without basis.

It's not my responsibility if you get pissed off by MY OPINION.

Apparently, you do.

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6 hours ago, anatess2 said:

And I read it a few years ago and I'm not fine with it.  We can have different stances on things you know.

Lot's of things change in just a few years, as did Ancestry's policy of privacy. Had you looked it up again, you would have seen this.

So yes I CAN get pissed off by your opinion.

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On 4/25/2019 at 2:20 PM, Iggy said:

I am trying to connect with living relatives - some of which hasn't been that hard really. What is hard is getting them to cut loose with the family stories/lore. If only I had the money to travel to them armed with a good tape recorder, camera, and camcorder even, and hundreds of $$ worth of blank tapes.

Hello, Iggy. 

The 70s called.  They want their technology back.

Edited by Mores

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30 minutes ago, Mores said:

Hello, Iggy. 

The 70s called.  They want their technology back.

What a rude remark!

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4 hours ago, Iggy said:

What a rude remark!

You were offended by that obvious joke?  I've spent some time trying to get myself to say I'm sorry.  But , no.  That was an obvious joke and you simply decided to be hurt by that.

Please tell me you were joking back, but not so obviously.

Tapes, camcorders, and you can't take a joke about using obsolete technology?

I guess that's the last time I try joking with you.

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