Emmanuel Goldstein

Thoughts on Pioneer Temple renovations

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Emmanuel Goldstein said:

Is this renovation project partly to prepare the Houses of the Lord for His return in the next few decades?

No

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No more than everything else we do is preparation for the Lord's return.

I do think the pioneer-era temple renovations have to do with updated earthquake codes, modern AC, and other needed updates in buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think, as I’ve said elsewhere, that it suggests the Church believes it will remain in uninterrupted possession of these structures for at least another generation or so; which arguably is a little incongruous with the catastrophic doodie-hits-the-fan scenario some of us may tend to associate with the times immediately preceding the Second Coming.

Otherwise, I don’t read much into it.  My daughter and I were in the Salt Lake Temple earlier this month and I was struck with how . . . tired much of the interior is, especially in the annex and underground portions.  Moreover, much of Salt Lake’s original beautiful wood finishes have been enameled over with a 1960s-era palette.  St. George and Logan are nothing like their original interior layouts; and while I think Manti has been more sensitively preserved, I don’t think it gotten serious attention since the mid-1980s.  It’s just plain time to do this, especially since the Church’s newest temples seem so much more (for lack of a better word) opulent than the ones we built in the late 20th century—more fine detailing/intricate patterns, more marble, more stained glass.

I also note that Oakland’s has been reconfigured so that those in the chapel adjacent the baptistery can now, while awaiting their turns to be baptized, see into the baptistery via a glass wall—I don’t remember that being possible, when I did baptisms there as a kid.  I wonder if more older temples generally are going to be retrofitted with this feature.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 
 
2
9 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

I also note that Oakland’s has been reconfigured so that those in the chapel adjacent the baptistery can now, while awaiting their turns to be baptized, see into the baptistery via a glass wall—I don’t remember that being possible, when I did baptisms there as a kid.  I wonder if more older temples generally are going to be retrofitted with this feature.  

Ooooh, this weekend my family is going to go through the open house tour, now I'm more excited.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The purpose of this church is to prepare a people for the return of Jesus for his reign of 1,000 years to finish all that is necessary to complete the plan of salvation of man.  Many think in terms of destroying the wicked but that is just a secondary consequence.  The primary purpose is to establish a society of Saints of G-d that are necessary both for his return and the completion (restoration) of all things.  The greatest need or accomplishment of the Saints are families.  Families that are centered around and dedicated to the divine union of a man and a woman in marriage.  Although there is much needed to be done in the temples - the foundation of preparations and the greater work will be done in the homes of the Saints.

I believe that the referbations of the temple are a type and shadow of what needs to be done in the home.  That our homes need to be physically clean and beautiful as well as spiritually pure and peaceful.  I am concerned that children are not being taught to keep homes (personal space) physically clean and beautiful and spiritually pure and peaceful.

 

The Traveler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎5‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 6:25 PM, Just_A_Guy said:

I think, as I’ve said elsewhere, that it suggests the Church believes it will remain in uninterrupted possession of these structures for at least another generation or so; which arguably is a little incongruous with the catastrophic doodie-hits-the-fan scenario some of us may tend to associate with the times immediately preceding the Second Coming.

Otherwise, I don’t read much into it.  My daughter and I were in the Salt Lake Temple earlier this month and I was struck with how . . . tired much of the interior is, especially in the annex and underground portions.  Moreover, much of Salt Lake’s original beautiful wood finishes have been enameled over with a 1960s-era palette.  St. George and Logan are nothing like their original interior layouts; and while I think Manti has been more sensitively preserved, I don’t think it gotten serious attention since the mid-1980s.  It’s just plain time to do this, especially since the Church’s newest temples seem so much more (for lack of a better word) opulent than the ones we built in the late 20th century—more fine detailing/intricate patterns, more marble, more stained glass.

I also note that Oakland’s has been reconfigured so that those in the chapel adjacent the baptistery can now, while awaiting their turns to be baptized, see into the baptistery via a glass wall—I don’t remember that being possible, when I did baptisms there as a kid.  I wonder if more older temples generally are going to be retrofitted with this feature.  

The new temples have outward appearances, but the older temples have quality materials.  I'd take something made out of the quality materials of the older temples than the new fall apart ones that have been constructed in the past few decades.

I'm hoping with the renovations they do not replace some of the quality materials with the cheaper and inferior stuff they've been putting in the newer temples recently. 

Of course, other factors are the updating of the temple interiors to code, wiring, and other items which need to be updated (or make sense, such as earthquake proofing).

Edited by JohnsonJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, JohnsonJones said:

The new temples have outward appearances, but the older temples have quality materials.  I'd take something made out of the quality materials of the older temples than the new fall apart ones that have been constructed in the past few decades.

I'm hoping with the renovations they do not replace some of the quality materials with the cheaper and inferior stuff they've been putting in the newer temples recently. 

Of course, other factors are the updating of the temple interiors to code, wiring, and other items which need to be updated (or make sense, such as earthquake proofing).

That’s interesting.  I believe we’ve heard several articles/talks about the “temple standard” approach to construction.  Do you have some examples?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thoughts -- I have seen some express some regret over the "remodel"/"gutting" of the Logan temple back in the '70's (I can just barely remember the open house and rededication) because they took out so much of the original. I find myself with both excitement and trepidation. Trepidation because I don't want to see these temples "gutted" and modernized. I want them to retain their historical, pioneer feel. Excitement because it will be valuable to do what we can to preserve and refresh these buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/23/2019 at 6:18 AM, Just_A_Guy said:

@jerome1232, see 5:24 of this video:

 

So no, no chapel with a view into the baptistry. That's just the waiting room which is adjacent to the confirmation rooms, to each side.

 

Ps: open house was great. There were a ton of people there. I loved the celestial room, it was beautiful.

Edited by jerome1232

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now