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Princess3dward

More Than One God?

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I am not looking for religion.

I am just making sense of some of them.

I am still learning..

I will look at the differences in opinion and see which makes sense.

I am not church hunting.

OK...God will direct your search for what makes sense, based upon the foundation of your reading his words and being able to tell when particular instructors are in line with them, or are off into their own agendas.

Better?

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<div class='quotemain'>

I am not looking for religion.

I am just making sense of some of them.

I am still learning..

I will look at the differences in opinion and see which makes sense.

I am not church hunting.

You told me earlier you were a Catholic....is that not true or did I misunderstand again.....and PC did give some good advice.....

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I am not talking about the churches. I am talking about the people in my family. I am not concerned about what some people I have never met and have never met me think about some letter I sent. I am concerned about how my loved ones react, and whether the church suddenly thinks I need to be visited more.

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Although a picture holds a thousand words, they aren't the same words for everyone.

If you are trying to say something, you'll have better luck with words in this case.

I think all here are trying to understand you and offer some encouragement.....and at times you make it very difficult......because of what you post and what you mean are always 2-3 different things and or meanings.

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I think there are a great deal of Christians who claim to be Trinitarian and think they are Trinitarian, but they are actually Modalists. What does everyone think? Is that true? If so, how widespread is that? If it IS widespread, do the Trinitarian ministers know it? If so, do they think it is an issue worth trying to fix?

Understand that I served a full-time mission in North Carolina and work with local full-time missionaries in Kansas City. In that work we go into the homes of non-Mormons and talk about Joseph Smith's First Vision within our discussion of the Gospel. As a result, the nature of the Oneness of God is often discussed. It is often heard in such discussions that the non-Mormon believes in the Trinity, however they often describe it in terms that would better describe Modalism. This is my primary reason for thinking what I do.

-a-train

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I think there are a great deal of Christians who claim to be Trinitarian and think they are Trinitarian, but they are actually Modalists. What does everyone think? Is that true? If so, how widespread is that? If it IS widespread, do the Trinitarian ministers know it? If so, do they think it is an issue worth trying to fix?

Understand that I served a full-time mission in North Carolina and work with local full-time missionaries in Kansas City. In that work we go into the homes of non-Mormons and talk about Joseph Smith's First Vision within our discussion of the Gospel. As a result, the nature of the Oneness of God is often discussed. It is often heard in such discussions that the non-Mormon believes in the Trinity, however they often describe it in terms that would better describe Modalism. This is my primary reason for thinking what I do.

-a-train

Some of our explanations can be imprecise and sound modalist. At other times, we may sound tri-theistic. But, most trinitarians understand that there is one God eternally existent in three persons. I would also suggest that most realize that the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are all in constant existence--a non-modalist belief.

So, I can see why you say what you say, but would chalk it up to vague and imprecise explanations, rather than an underlying and thorough-going modalism with traditional churches.

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Modalism is one God in three persons such as first he was the Father, then He became the Son, then the Holy Spirt. That is not true trinitarianism.

A real simplistic explanation of the difference:

Trinitarians believe three persons are in the one God. God the Father, God the Son, God the Holy Spirit.

Modalist (Oneness or 'Jesus Only') believe there is one person in three God roles. Jesus, as the Son, Jesus as the Father, Jesus as the Holy Spirit.

LDS believe that there are three gods in the one Godhead. God the Father, AND Jesus, his god-Son, AND the Holy Spirit, also a god--all united in the work of the Godhead.

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You know, a person isn't obligated to reject the Trinity doctrine or give some distinct personal profession of any specific definition of the Oneness of the Father, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost, in order to be baptized in the LDS Church. A belief in the Three and a profession of acceptance of Jesus as the Saviour is required, but one is not asked about the nuances of Their Oneness.

I would ask: Would the notion that there be two distinct physical bodies of flesh and bone for the Father and the Son respectively inherently violate the Trinity doctrine? If God can be Three Divine Persons, can He not have more than one Holy Tabernacle?

-a-train

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I'd answer no. As revealed in the Bible, it is one God in three (Father, Son, Holy Spirit) period.

Ahhh... Shucks. I should have phrased my two questions together better. Are you answering: 'No. The notion that there be two distinct physical bodies of flesh and bone for the Father and the Son respectively would not inherently violate the Trinity doctrine.' or 'No, God cannot have more than one Holy Tabernacle.'?

Perhaps I should have phrased my questions like this:

Would the notion that there be two distinct physical bodies of flesh and bone for the Father and the Son respectively inherently violate the Trinity doctrine? Does the Trinity doctrine specifically declare that God can have no more than one body of flesh and bone?

-a-train

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You know, a person isn't obligated to reject the Trinity doctrine or give some distinct personal profession of any specific definition of the Oneness of the Father, His Son Jesus Christ, and the Holy Ghost, in order to be baptized in the LDS Church. A belief in the Three and a profession of acceptance of Jesus as the Saviour is required, but one is not asked about the nuances of Their Oneness.

I would ask: Would the notion that there be two distinct physical bodies of flesh and bone for the Father and the Son respectively inherently violate the Trinity doctrine? If God can be Three Divine Persons, can He not have more than one Holy Tabernacle?

-a-train

A-train, I would suggest that one could be baptized into your church as a trinitarian, but that, come testimony time, should one stand up and say that s/he knew that Joseph Smith was a prophet, that the Church was true, and that the Council at Nicea properly discerned the nature of God, as Holy Trinity, there might be a few followup conversations after the meeting (if not during). :lol:

Two answer your question--for a trinitarian to say in his/her church, "God in three persons, blessed trinity--with the Father and the Son, literally shaking hands--would lead to similar followup conversations.

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