Backroads

Would you list a mission on a resume?

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On 10/4/2019 at 2:05 PM, mirkwood said:

I replaced my doTerra line:

Yeah, I've been trying to make it clear to the roommate that the only essential oils I believe in are made by Mobil, Birchwood-Casey and Break-Free. 

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Maybe along a similar line - Years ago, I was looking for shared office space to practice law. My resume at the time included working with the HIV/AIDS coalition of the city's bar association, doing estate work for this population. This was fairly early on, before the AIDS cocktail had started to change life expectancy. I had one guy tell me to take it off of my resume. People would wonder why I was associated with this group - was I gay? Did I have AIDS? Without a personal connection, why would I be working with these people? Would AIDS patients be coming into the office?

I guess the idea of providing legal work for those who needed it was an ethical concept that escaped him. 

btw - I only had 1 gay male client under this program. All the rest were females who had been given HIV by their male partners, including husbands. 

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My husband included his mission on his resume - at the end along with Eagle Scout. It shows commitment (among other things) and indicates a clean lifestyle (which is a plus for government jobs or so I've heard).

Oh - and he was applying outside the 'Mormon Corridor'

Edited by Manners Matter

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On 9/30/2019 at 3:42 AM, Backroads said:

Trouble sleeping, found this. Wife not sure if Husband should include mission on resume. (#4 on advice column)

Got me curious. Those of you who served missions, have you/would you?

A younger me didn't like the idea of listing my affiliation with the Church in any way on a job resume because what business does the interviewer have to know my religion?  They should make a decision to hire me based on my merits alone and not have any bias for or against my personal beliefs.  Not that they would, but why even risk it (a younger me would think)? Although not listing the mission experience didn't really matter since I graduated from BYU and had that listed on there.  

At this point in my life I don't care if prospective hiring companies know I'm a member of the Church.  Even though it's none of their business, I actually prefer being open with who I am with my personal beliefs.  And at least in my experience, it has made absolutely zero difference in how others have treated me in the workplace from me being reserved about sharing my religious affiliation to being open about it.

I don't currently list my mission experience on my resume just because there's more pertinent experience I prefer to list to illustrate the working qualifications I now have. 

Edited by clbent04

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On the article itself, something else raised an eyebrow about their advice.

The first question deals with an employee that is driven to meetings that are out of office and expects others to drive him.  Unless the job he works in specified that a vehicle was necessary, assigning him to go someplace farther than walking distance becomes that companies responsibility.  If he is the assigned individual and does not have a way to get there, they can't really fire him for something that was not in the "contract." or listed expectations.  This, of course, is location dependant, but it sounds as if they have many local meetings where a vehicle may be required.  As this also seems to be a location where public transit is easily available, they cannot expect every employee to have a car.  Thus, unless they SPECIFY personal vehicles are mandatory or necessary, the expectation that everyone even has a vehicle seems to be something that could land them in trouble unless they specify such a requirement.

Thus, he SHOULD expect to be driven there, or they provide a company vehicle, or some other means to getting to that location.

When I go to a meeting FOR work, work pays for the plane ticket, the accommodations, and various other necessities.  If it is something I SET up, that may be different, but if the work is setting up the meetings and never specified that he would need personal vehicles and pay out of pocket to get to those meetings that are some distance away, then they cannot expect an employee to pay out of pocket for THEIR expenses.  This is known as a kickback and unless understood by both parties can be seen as HIGHLY unethical.

Now companies CAN have employees use their own personal transportation, but this must be a known expectation.  If this was a change that occurred, they needed to make it known that employees would have to buy a vehicle if they did not own one already (and expect the ensuing legal fees for placing a couple thousand dollar kickback on the employee without notice in that manner).  If the employees know that vehicles are expected to be used, or can be used, then it is fair game, but raises the question of why the specific employee is not checking to see if they will need a vehicle during the day to go to meetings outside of their work office.  If they are required to use personal transportation, the company does not have to reimburse the employee (though reimbursement via Federal taxes may still be claimed) in many cases, though in some states and nations if an accident or other incident happens between the employee and others, the company may be held liable. 

In short, the company is required to make the arrangements of transportation, either by agreement with the employee (personal transportation and personal vehicles) or otherwise (making available company vehicles or transportation to get employees to where they need to be).

In the same light, of course, other employees should not be expected to pick up the slack for the company.  Thus, yes, the employee can refuse to drive the other employee, but should refer the one needing transportation to the Front offices, HR, or other bureaucratic group that should be handling this issue.

That sort of bothered my with their answer to the question. 

In regards to the Mission question, I'd say there is no clear cut answer to this.  It REALLY depends on the employer.  In some instances it may help, in others it will hinder.  In Utah, I suspect that it's a good way of weeding out those with the same morals or ethics on both sides of the fence (employer and employee) if one chooses to put it on their resume.

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On 9/30/2019 at 7:42 AM, Backroads said:

Trouble sleeping, found this. Wife not sure if Husband should include mission on resume. (#4 on advice column)

Got me curious. Those of you who served missions, have you/would you?

I began this one back in 2017.....

and I am still alive..... for which I am thankful to Messiah Yeshua - Jesus and the Comforter and the

Ancient of Days the Father.......

 

but a lot of potential employers might get kind of spooked by this one:

 

"I want to start an online outreach to Satanists...."

by some guy named DennisTate

on a secular political forum......

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