prisonchaplain

Temples and Adult Converts

Recommended Posts

My question is inspired by the temple article--which I found informative and well done, btw. The article stated that older children and teens can do baptisms for the dead. So, which ordinances do newer adult converts usually start out with? Also, if anyone can share some of their early experiences and reactions, that would be insightful. Many thanks!

Edited by prisonchaplain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, prisonchaplain said:

My question is inspired by the temple article--which I found informative and well done, btw. The article stated that older children and teens can do baptisms for the dead. So, which ordinances do newer adult converts usually start out with? Also, if anyone can share some of their early experiences and reactions, that would be insightful. Many thanks!

All baptized people (age 11+) start off doing baptisms for the dead, as well as confirmations for the dead.  This does for adult converts as well.

After an 18+ person is spiritually ready,  (if male) ordained a Melchizedek order priest, and been a member for at least a year, then they can take out thier own endowments.  After that they may do endowments and sealings for the dead. 

I'm not sure if you're looking for teenage experiences, but I know @Grunt and @anatass2 have talked about their adult convert experiences.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Jane_Doe said:

All baptized people (age 11+) start off doing baptisms for the dead, as well as confirmations for the dead.  This does for adult converts as well.

After an 18+ person is spiritually ready,  (if male) ordained a Melchizedek order priest*, and been a member for at least a year, then they can take out thier own endowments.  After that they may do endowments and sealings for the dead. 

I'm not sure if you're looking for teenage experiences, but I know @Grunt and @anatass2 have talked about their adult convert experiences.  

*elder 

Nitpicking on an otherwise fantastic description 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After getting baptized, I immediately had the opportunity to interview for a limited temple recommend.  This is good for baptisms and confirmation only.  After 1 year, I was given the opportunity to interview for a full temple recommend to get my endowments (which includes the covenant to wear garments) afterwhich I was eligible to get sealed to my husband.  After being endowed and sealed for myself, I could get endowments and sealings for those that have already passed.

I went to do baptisms and confirmation for the dead a lot.  At least once a month until I was eligible for endowments.  I found that doing this service allows me to better re-affirm my own baptismal covenants.  When I went to get my endowments I was 3 weeks from giving birth to my first child so I was ginormous, hot, and uncomfortably waddling around.  I was separated from my husband and I simply followed ushers around and the symbolism went whooz over my head.  I was feeling very lost until my husband came out of one door in his ceremonial clothing and when I looked at him, his very blonde hair looked like a halo over his head and his white clothes made him look like he was backlit with sunshine - he looked like one of those Catholic saints that I adored since a little kid - and I immediately felt this sense of peace and comfort.  The rest of the day was just awesome especially when we got sealed with my husband's first bishop who he loved dearly performing the ordinance.   

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, estradling75 said:

Pretty much the rule is once you can do it yourself (for the living) then you can also do it for the dead.

From what I understand, the only exception is sealings.  You can do sealings as a vicarious spouse before you've done that yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, dprh said:

From what I understand, the only exception is sealings.  You can do sealings as a vicarious spouse before you've done that yourself.

I did sealings while a young and obviously unmarried missionary in the MTC. The officiator at one point forgot to say "for and in behalf of", and so at the last moment I spoke up and, I supposed, saved myself from serving a couples' mission and having only the one companion.

As a matter of policy, only youth twelve (perhaps now eleven?) and older can get limited-use recommends for baptisms, so 8-10-year-olds might constitute another exception to the general rule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Jane_Doe said:

All baptized people (age 11+) start off doing baptisms for the dead, as well as confirmations for the dead.  This does for adult converts as well.

After an 18+ person is spiritually ready,  (if male) ordained a Melchizedek order priest, and been a member for at least a year, then they can take out thier own endowments.  After that they may do endowments and sealings for the dead. 

I'm not sure if you're looking for teenage experiences, but I know @Grunt and @anatass2 have talked about their adult convert experiences.  

Mrs Grunt is starting Temple Prep classes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sealings of the living children to parents can be done regardless of age. All kids can participate in their own family sealing.  Kids born "in the covenant", that is, born to parents who are sealed, are automatically sealed under that covenant of the parents.  Adopted kids can also be sealed to their adoptive parents, regardless of age.  The marriage sealing is a separate ordinance than parents to child(ren) sealings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/9/2020 at 8:36 PM, prisonchaplain said:

My question is inspired by the temple article--which I found informative and well done, btw. The article stated that older children and teens can do baptisms for the dead. So, which ordinances do newer adult converts usually start out with? Also, if anyone can share some of their early experiences and reactions, that would be insightful. Many thanks!

There is something else you ought to know.  When the children of Israel had left Egypt and wondered for "40" years; Joshua brought them to the river Jordan and there he washed them.  This was a symbolic ordinance to prepare them for the promised land.  This washing was similar to baptism but for a slightly different purpose.  Before a person is endowed in the temples with power from on high - they are washed and anointed as a symbolic ordinance similar to Joshua washing Israel before entering the promised land.

Sometime later Jesus went down to the Jordan river to be baptized by John the Baptist.  As a priest authorized to baptize I also theorize that John knew about the washing of Joshua that according to Jewish tradition took place at the same place of Jordan where Jesus came to John.  I believe it is important to note that the Hebrew name of Jesus was the same as that Joshua - Jesus being more associated with the Greek.  Note that John thought he should be washed by "Joshua" even though John has already been baptized himself.  I believe it was because he was referencing the ancient Joshua preparing Israel for "greater" worship.

In the temple - this ordinance of washing is necessary before receiving the covenant of higher worship we call the endowment - which is "power" from on high.  It has been said that part of the temple ordinances is the covenant to wear the sacred garment but the garment should not be worn until one has been washed by ordinance (first performed by Moses and Aaron at the Tabernacle).  If you were to visit Israel today and be taught by the Jews concerning the temple - you will learn that anciently those that came to the temple would be washed by ordinance and then they would put away their "normal" attire and wear white linen to present themselves for worship before G-d at the temple.

It is prophesy that before Christ returns a "New: Temple will be constructed in Jerusalem (Ezekiel).  

 

The Traveler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an adult convert, I was ordained Priest shortly after baptism.  I received a limited use recommend pretty soon after, which granted me access to the baptistry.  I went on youth night to assist in baptisms.  Shortly after receiving the higher priesthood I continued to attend on youth night with a limited use recommend.  I was able to participate in baptisms and confirmations.  13 months after baptism I had a full use recommend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, prisonchaplain said:

Marriage is done in temple as is the related sealing. Given the sacredness, is it harder for young couples to gain approval from parents? Also, do bishops need to grant approval?

I would guess that active and believing LDS parents are about as picky as your average loving, religious parents. The fact that a so-called temple marriage implicitly requires both spouses to be LDS makes cross-faith sealings impossible, so that removes what would otherwise doubtless be a big potential impediment.

The bishops do not "grant approval" in any formal sense, but they are required to issue the special temple recommend allowing their respective young marriage partner to be sealed. They offer counsel, of course, and may choose to voice their concern about a potential match, but as long as they find the partner(s) worthy to enter into the covenant, they don't otherwise have a voice in whether that couple marries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, prisonchaplain said:

Marriage is done in temple as is the related sealing. Given the sacredness, is it harder for young couples to gain approval from parents? Also, do bishops need to grant approval?

Parents: it's pretty much the same process as any other group that prizes marriage.  You don't actually need your parents approval, but having goodly parent's wisdom & guidance is a great thing.  Plus it makes the whole post-wedding life easier to have good relationships with the parents ;).  

 

Bishops in regards to civil marriage: a bishop is actually certified to do legally marry a couple- I was married by one.  There's no super formal process here, we just asked my parent's bishop (whom was a long term friend of mine) to come to the place we were having our wedding and officiate.  He was quite excited, offered us good guidance, and did a fantastic job. 

Bishops in regards to a sealing: you do need to have a special interview and recommend before you have your marriage sealed.  It's very similar the 'normal' recommend interview, except that there's more talk about the importance of a sealing and what this means-- the desire to make sure the couple understands the promises are they are about to make.  It's the same process for all couples: those just now getting civilly married & sealed at the same time, those which have already been civilly married a long time, etc.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jane_Doe said:

Parents: it's pretty much the same process as any other group that prizes marriage.  You don't actually need your parents approval, but having goodly parent's wisdom & guidance is a great thing.  Plus it makes the whole post-wedding life easier to have good relationships with the parents ;).  

 

Bishops in regards to civil marriage: a bishop is actually certified to do legally marry a couple- I was married by one.  There's no super formal process here, we just asked my parent's bishop (whom was a long term friend of mine) to come to the place we were having our wedding and officiate.  He was quite excited, offered us good guidance, and did a fantastic job. 

Bishops in regards to a sealing: you do need to have a special interview and recommend before you have your marriage sealed.  It's very similar the 'normal' recommend interview, except that there's more talk about the importance of a sealing and what this means-- the desire to make sure the couple understands the promises are they are about to make.  It's the same process for all couples: those just now getting civilly married & sealed at the same time, those which have already been civilly married a long time, etc.  

Another interview?  Uh oh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Vort said:

I would guess that active and believing LDS parents are about as picky as your average loving, religious parents. The fact that a so-called temple marriage implicitly requires both spouses to be LDS makes cross-faith sealings impossible, so that removes what would otherwise doubtless be a big potential impediment.

The bishops do not "grant approval" in any formal sense, but they are required to issue the special temple recommend allowing their respective young marriage partner to be sealed. They offer counsel, of course, and may choose to voice their concern about a potential match, but as long as they find the partner(s) worthy to enter into the covenant, they don't otherwise have a voice in whether that couple marries.

There's a Korean saying that goes back a generation: Easy to marry, easy to divorce. Hard to marry, hard to divorce. This is one area where I do have a bit of holy envy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, prisonchaplain said:

Marriage is done in temple as is the related sealing. Given the sacredness, is it harder for young couples to gain approval from parents? Also, do bishops need to grant approval?

Pretty much all active LDS parents would be absolutely delighted that their children are planning to be married in the temple, and, I believe, would generally do all they could to bring about such an outcome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/9/2020 at 9:36 PM, prisonchaplain said:

My question is inspired by the temple article--which I found informative and well done, btw. The article stated that older children and teens can do baptisms for the dead. So, which ordinances do newer adult converts usually start out with? Also, if anyone can share some of their early experiences and reactions, that would be insightful. Many thanks!

I did a few baptisms for the dead when I first got my recommend. It was a good experience, but as an adult, no, I didn't want to get in the baptismal font too many times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now