Sign in to follow this  
Vernor's Ginger Ale

Corona Just Killed My Job

Recommended Posts

13 hours ago, mrmarket said:

I see this all the time and you probably also do with the "go fund me" pleas on FB for people who had a sudden death of a family member esp Dad who was the bread winner. At the going rate of about $18K to bury someone on the cheap it isnt a far stretch to say most Americans cannot cover that with any money they have much less what is in their checking/savings. 
 

Does no one cremate anymore? You can get someone cremated for around 1k. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, NeedleinA said:

Side note: It is interesting to see how, in our minds, "A recent widow" easily turns into "poor little old widow". We all make these mental jumps from time to time. 

You are correct however you did not provide any context.

4 hours ago, NeedleinA said:

Yes, my scenario comes from a similar type indecent. Anyone is welcome to insert themselves into this situation and ask, "What would you have done?". Rather, "What do you think the Spirit would have directed you to do?". About 5-6 years ago, the Bishop in a neighboring ward went from conducting meetings one week to deceased the next. He, in his mid-40s, left behind his wife and 7 kids. She was not a little old widow, simply a very recent widow. She apparently had left finances up to her husband. How all the nuts and bolts played out between her and the Stake President is between them. As an ultimate result she was given financial assistance, mortgage being part of it.

Was she a fool with her money? Was she fiscally irresponsible? I guess one could argue one way or another if they had all the facts and if they cared to. I guess one could argue that the SP was or wasn't inspired to help relieve some immediate suffering on her part through financial assistance, if they cared to. Educating her to the ways of finance, delving into her spending habits, etc., while definitely helpful at a later date, probably wasn't what she needed or was even mentally capable* of absorbing in that exact moment of financial need.

*She shares about this time in her life fairly openly.

While I am certain that this was a very difficult time for her, and I am sure that the Stake president followed the spirit and did what was best. There are lessons to be learned. Which I suspect most people can't see. What is your takeaway from her experience? 

Edited by omegaseamaster75

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, mrmarket said:

I meet with potential clients every day and about half are out to get themselves financially rescued. Average person I see has maybe between $500-$1000 in savings and $40-50 in a 401K/IRA at best. I do my best to help them with a plan of sorts but there is nothing there to manage. Mormons/non-mormons both suck at managing money so yea I can believe the old woman now widowed who has paid her tithes every month is one mortgage payment away from homelessness. I cannot speak to all the mistakes made along the way, but I know of several many faithful members make (because I see them) make which are absolute wealth destroyers. The heathens just do other things with money which are not fiscally smart.

I see this also, individuals want help making a budget and saving money, but its hard to squeeze blood out of a rock without taking drastic measures. If people are serious about digging themselves out of a financial mess very, very hard decisions need to be made. They really need to ask themselves can I afford to live in the house I live in? do we need two car payments? or even one car payment? maybe I can't afford to live where I want to live and need to move. Do I really need a smart phone? Cable TV? Netflix? Eating out? Vacations? 

When you break it down to the essentials you can save. Most are unwilling to take the steps necessary to dig themselves out of their hole.

Edited by omegaseamaster75

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, omegaseamaster75 said:

Does no one cremate anymore? You can get someone cremated for around 1k. 

Lots of people, especially religious ones, still do not feel cremation is acceptable due to the belief of the body as a temple - electively burning when a "proper burial" is possible is a desecration of the temple.  It wasn't too long ago that the Catholic Church accepted cremated remains to be allowed in a Catholic Church for funeral services and buried in the Catholic cemetery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, omegaseamaster75 said:

 What is your takeaway from her experience? 

Probably many of the same takeaways that you might have too. A couple:
1. Share and train each other in finances (even if you are the mother of 7 kids, you should know the household finances well enough to take over).
2. Have a death plan in place, in advance (where, what, how, etc.)
3. Have a designated appointee, not suffering from the sudden trauma, step in to help guide and make sound decisions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, omegaseamaster75 said:

Does no one cremate anymore? You can get someone cremated for around 1k. 

From the handbook

38.7.2

Cremation

The Church does not normally encourage cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation.

Where possible, the body of a deceased member who has been endowed should be dressed in temple clothing when it is cremated. A funeral service may be held (see 29.6).

https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/manual/general-handbook/38-church-policies-and-guidelines?lang=eng

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well that escalated quickly.

I may actually default on my mortgage.  But the laws of the state prevent foreclosure for just just a couple of months.  And given the circumstances, banks will tend to be more lenient.

I have seen the bishop for a storehouse order.  He mentioned that there has been a run on the storehouse.  Some are using it as food storage or to maintain a luxury diet or something like that.  I told him my circumstance and my analysis.  He was satisfied that I needed some help.  He was pleased to hear that I had sufficient savings under other circumstances.  So, we'll see.

Edited by Vernor's Ginger Ale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cortana just killed my job

What my eyes thought they saw just now when looking at this thread title. But who would this apply to? Someone who reads news articles on demand all day? Someone who takes the Pillar of Autumn to light speed? Someone whose job depends on women having attractive haircuts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've dealt with this at times and it is a HARD thing when a member comes and cannot make a house payment or rent.  It really depends on those in charge of your stake.  People think the Bishop has the final say, but many times they don't have as much power as one may think.  They have people they have to report to.  There is a pot of money that is only so large, and that's what they draw out of typically (sure, there may be exceptions, but be willing to take a grilling in that instance).

Many times some Bishops (and I can't speak for all, I have seen there are several with different experiences than mine) actually take money out of their own pocket in order to help the members in their ward.  People think that it is just easily written for the Bishop to request more money...but that's not reality, at least for many.  Perhaps it comes down to luck of the draw who is in charge of over the entire thing, but I've had many experiences where there simply wasn't enough money to help people or at least enough allocated. 

I need to look at my finances hard in the coming months, especially with what I'm about to suggest to others.   I don't want to be the hypocrite and I am worried myself about what happens in certain circumstances, what happens if I can't get paid or they determine that because we aren't at the office as much we don't get paid as much.  What happens in regards to my savings and such...however...I'd say if one is able to give a generous fast offering over the next few months (IF ONE IS ABLE TO DO SO).  I think Fast Offerings are going to be greatly needed as we go on in this year, and I think many will greatly appreciate the help.

I'm not longer in a position of leadership that deals with this type of stuff  (and I am incredibly thankful for that), so I don't know what the condition of those around me dealing with this is yet.  I do think that there may be a great many that will need assistance, especially with the warnings coming down from economists that we are already entering a recession and possibly going into a depression.  If we can give generous Fast Offerings (and once again, that is for those who can do so, don't cause yourself to need to go on welfare because you gave such a generous offering...be budget conscious with all decisions of course), I feel (at least in my general area, and it could just be my own feelings) that these funds will be sorely needed in the coming months.

Edited by JohnsonJones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2020 at 7:58 AM, dprh said:

From the handbook

38.7.2

Cremation

The Church does not normally encourage cremation. The family of the deceased must decide whether the body should be cremated, taking into account any laws governing burial or cremation. In some countries, the law requires cremation.

Where possible, the body of a deceased member who has been endowed should be dressed in temple clothing when it is cremated. A funeral service may be held (see 29.6).

https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/study/manual/general-handbook/38-church-policies-and-guidelines?lang=eng

See highlighted parts, you can cremate.

In the example given cremation needed to have been a valid option. While not encouraged it should have been part of the conversations especially with a mortgage and 7 small children at home. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2020 at 7:53 AM, NeedleinA said:

Probably many of the same takeaways that you might have too. A couple:
1. Share and train each other in finances (even if you are the mother of 7 kids, you should know the household finances well enough to take over).
2. Have a death plan in place, in advance (where, what, how, etc.)
3. Have a designated appointee, not suffering from the sudden trauma, step in to help guide and make sound decisions.

well said. I wonder if any of these items were ever mentioned as a cautionary tale for other members of the ward?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this