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Pres. Oaks: Racism and Other Challenges. . . Um. . .

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https://newsroom.churchofjesuschrist.org/article/president-oaks-byu-devotional-october-2020-talk#_ftn15

I don't think there is much of a way to read between the lines on this one, and I'm really struggling to understand what is going on.  In President Oaks speech today, there are a few quotes that bother me.

Quote

Of course, Black lives matter! That is an eternal truth all reasonable people should support. Unfortunately, that persuasive banner was sometimes used or understood to stand for other things that do not command universal support. Examples include abolishing the police or seriously reducing their effectiveness or changing our constitutional government. All these are appropriate subjects for advocacy, but not under what we hope to be the universally acceptable message: Black lives matter.

How are those things appropriate subjects for advocacy?  I can only assume he is meaning this from the perspective of the First Amendment; otherwise, it is a sincerely concerning statement.

He later quotes President Nelson who in June, responding to the George Floyd incident said:

Quote

We join with many throughout this nation and around the world who are deeply saddened at recent events of racism and a blatant disregard for human life. We abhor the reality that some would deny others respect and the most basic freedoms because of the color of his or her skin.

Apparently I missed that statement back in June.  Regardless, where are the Brethren coming up with confirmation that George Floyd's death, in addition to police brutality, was for sure an incident of racism?

The final concerning quote is this:

Quote

There are many examples of racism in recent American history. The examples most familiarly reported by the media today are those that victimize Black Americans. These include the police brutality and other systemic discrimination in employment and housing publicized recently. Racism is still recognizable in official and personal treatment of Latinos and Native Americans.

So this quote makes it sound like police brutality is a specifically racist problem and then goes on to make it sound as though systemic racism is a real thing.  These statements aren't given any real qualification and so I am left bewildered as to if the Brethren have received some sort of spiritual confirmation that things like systemic racism and racially targeted police brutality against black Americans is a real issue affecting our country, or if this is simply an opinion that may or may not be accurate, or if it is a misspoken outreach to the snowflakes.

In the rest of the talk he condemns many leftist ideals, upholds the Constitution, and calls out the anxiety and fear driven nature of the snowflake generation.

Quote

Instead of being swept along in the anxiety and fear that is characteristic of your generation, rely on the assurances of a loving Heavenly Father.

Anyway, I'm confused.  Any thoughts or ideas to help?

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15 minutes ago, person0 said:
Quote

Of course, Black lives matter! That is an eternal truth all reasonable people should support. Unfortunately, that persuasive banner was sometimes used or understood to stand for other things that do not command universal support. Examples include abolishing the police or seriously reducing their effectiveness or changing our constitutional government. All these are appropriate subjects for advocacy, but not under what we hope to be the universally acceptable message: Black lives matter.

How are those things appropriate subjects for advocacy?  I can only assume he is meaning this from the perspective of the First Amendment; otherwise, it is a sincerely concerning statement.

President Oaks is a lawyer, and many of his pronouncements are best understood through that lens. In saying what he did, President Oaks was not promoting those positions as worthy. He was merely stating that such subjects were (as he said) appropriate for addressing in a manner of advocacy. Other examples of advocacy-appropriate topics might include universal basic income, nationalized health care, and shale oil production. You don't have to be for or against any of those topics to recognize that they are "appropriate subjects for advocacy."

20 minutes ago, person0 said:

He later quotes President Nelson who in June, responding to the George Floyd incident said:

Quote

We join with many throughout this nation and around the world who are deeply saddened at recent events of racism and a blatant disregard for human life. We abhor the reality that some would deny others respect and the most basic freedoms because of the color of his or her skin.

Apparently I missed that statement back in June.  Regardless, where are the Brethren coming up with confirmation that George Floyd's death, in addition to police brutality, was for sure an incident of racism?

Please note that no Apostle has made a public statement affirming that George Floyd was killed for reasons of race. (Unless one slipped by me, which I'm quite sure didn't happen, or we all would have heard about it incessantly.) They kept things rather generic—"recent events of racism"—without naming anything specific. This may seem to play into the Social Justice Warrior theme of "black people are all persecuted", but viewed as pure statements of observation and sage advice, I think they hold up fine. Things usually need to be understood in context, but sometimes that context can provide unwarranted and perhaps even unintended subtexts. I think that's what's going on here.

24 minutes ago, person0 said:
Quote

There are many examples of racism in recent American history. The examples most familiarly reported by the media today are those that victimize Black Americans. These include the police brutality and other systemic discrimination in employment and housing publicized recently. Racism is still recognizable in official and personal treatment of Latinos and Native Americans.

So this quote makes it sound like police brutality is a specifically racist problem and then goes on to make it sound as though systemic racism is a real thing.  These statements aren't given any real qualification and so I am left bewildered as to if the Brethren have received some sort of spiritual confirmation that things like systemic racism and racially targeted police brutality against black Americans is a real issue affecting our country, or if this is simply an opinion that may or may not be accurate, or if it is a misspoken outreach to the snowflakes.

Same analysis as above. I would add that so-called systemic racism is almost certainly a real thing. The two important questions are: To what degree? Ang against whom? I would suggest that the answer to the first question is, "Not to as great a degree as the SJWs scream," and to the second question, "Historically against minorities, especially blacks, but in the last decade or so consciously targeted specifically toward white people—and not merely culturally, but openly taught in universities and even attempted to be encoded into law."

27 minutes ago, person0 said:

In the rest of the talk he condemns many leftist ideals, upholds the Constitution, and calls out the anxiety and fear driven nature of the snowflake generation.

Quote

Instead of being swept along in the anxiety and fear that is characteristic of your generation, rely on the assurances of a loving Heavenly Father.

Anyway, I'm confused.  Any thoughts or ideas to help?

I guess I must be officially becoming An Old Guy, because I find that pretty funny,.

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@Vort,
That is the approach I tend to take in understanding these things; however, when placed in context it is so easy to see it from the lens I initially asked about, which is the lens through which 'woke' members seem to look at it.  This leads me to question what I am missing, because, as noted previously, the actual data doesn't warrant the analysis in the context I am inclined to interpret from the text.  If I were on the other side of the argument, I would certainly be pointing to these exact statements as evidence of the reality of those things as I understand them.  As much as I often appreciate the 'he who hath ears to hear' approach.  At what point is it dishonest for an Apostle to speak with words he is intelligent enough to know will be taken to mean something more than what is being said?  Or is it?

Anyway, I appreciate your analysis; I just wish it were not so easy for a duality of interpretation to take place.  Sadly, I think that duality leads so many, particularly on the 'woke' side, to miss the primary point of healing and overcoming our challenges through a principled focus on the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

 

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@person0 Minor thought.
I read the quote you posted multiple times, being frustrated by it each time I read it. Each time, I failed to read it as the following:

Quote

The shocking police-produced death of George Floyd in Minnesota last May was surely the trigger for these nationwide protests, whose momentum was carried forward under the message of “Black Lives Matter.” Of course, Black lives matter! That is an eternal truth all reasonable people should support. Unfortunately, that persuasive banner was sometimes used or understood to stand for other things that do not command universal support. Examples include abolishing the police or seriously reducing their effectiveness or changing our constitutional government. All these are appropriate subjects for advocacy, but not under what we hope to be the universally acceptable message: Black lives matter.

"Things that do not command universal support. Examples":
- Abolishing the police (do not support)
- Seriously reducing their (police) effectiveness (do not support)
- Changing our constitutional government (do no support)

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There was nothing in Pres. Oaks talk that was controversial or confusing. Folks (and especially our kids) need to realize and remember that black lives do matter, (everyone's life matters and is important) but the organization that calls themselves "black lives matter" is not actually associated with that phrase, and could actually care less about the prosperity of black america. Their organization is all about destroying our country as we know it at any cost, and lifting themselves up through theft and violence. They, along with may rioters we see in places like Seattle - aka CHAZ, are today's version of the Gadianton Robbers - lazy, evil, destructive, and disgusting people. Black Lives Matter, but Black Lives Matter as a phrase and black lives matter the organization are two completely different things. The actions and messages of the latter are far away from love, tolerance, and acceptance. This group is exhibit A of a wolf in sheep's clothing.

Edited by scottyg
spelling

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According to covenant the Saints morn with those that morn.  This is most difficult for me.  I seldom even morn concerning myself.  In time all my tragedies seem to become humorous and laughable.   We have, or at least have had at one time or another many posters on this forum that are minorities - if nothing else minorities to our Latter-day Saint communities.  Many have hinted at one time or another being somewhat left out of the club or at least not as free to express their opinions.  One lady in particular I found fascinating.  Often our opinions clashed but I can honestly say I found her a kindred spirit to who I felt love and compassion.  I regret she no longer posts - I miss her insights.  I am quite sure there are others - particularly  of what is called the "Black Minority".  I hope this thread does not die out without their insights.

 

The Traveler

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1 hour ago, NeedleinA said:

@person0 Minor thought.
I read the quote you posted multiple times, being frustrated by it each time I read it. Each time, I failed to read it as the following:

"Things that do not command universal support. Examples":
- Abolishing the police (do not support)
- Seriously reducing their (police) effectiveness (do not support)
- Changing our constitutional government (do no support)

I agree with you 100%.  But members I know aren't getting the message.  The image below is from a social media post of someone I know.

image.png.9eaacd0afc493d7925b0118d72e902f3.png

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7 minutes ago, person0 said:

I agree with you 100%.  But members I know aren't getting the message.  The image below is from a social media post of someone I know.

image.png.9eaacd0afc493d7925b0118d72e902f3.png

I too agree with you 100%. I actually brought up this issue/concern yesterday here:

 

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On 10/28/2020 at 11:27 AM, person0 said:

image.png.9eaacd0afc493d7925b0118d72e902f3.png

Embrace BLM? People have lost their freakin minds.
BLM fights for racial equality by looting small businesses.
6223449_053120-wpvi-looting-west-philly-raw-video-CC-vid.jpg.aa3cfafb5c29b8910c5a240015f864c6.jpg

BLM fights for racial equality by stealing TVs.
Walmart.jpg.50a48f9df944f342aadee6b6dca43cdf.jpg

BLM fights for racial equality by trashing their own cities.
MPIDMZNAJBA5DN4Q76MNXX4TIU.thumb.jpg.068044afb577cac1c7d1b1725880d6d2.jpg

BLM & "LDS?" members who support BLM, the movement, can go suck eggs.
6223489_053120-wpvi-chpolice-suv-damaged-raw-vid.jpg.050af02bbd7b04f7ca598b0a3329758f.jpg

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On 10/28/2020 at 10:27 AM, person0 said:

I agree with you 100%.  But members I know aren't getting the message.  The image below is from a social media post of someone I know.

image.png.9eaacd0afc493d7925b0118d72e902f3.png

Then we must all educate them as best we can. Pres Oaks was referring to the slogan/statement "black lives matter". People need to know that the phrase and the BLM movement are two different things. BLM only cares about self-aggrandizement through destruction...they don't give a rat's patootie about actual black lives...or anyone's life for that matter. If they did, they would be protesting the countless black on black deaths we see in Chicago every day.

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On 10/29/2020 at 1:58 PM, scottyg said:

If they did, they would be protesting the countless black on black deaths we see in Chicago every day.

Let's talk about that. How many black violent criminals do you think are currently in our prison system? Do you think it's common for black murderers to go unpunished? Does a black man get a paid vacation from work when he wrongfully kills someone? Do you think a black man could shoot blindly into someone's apartment, kill an unarmed woman, and not go to jail and be charged with murder? The protests aren't just about death, they're about justice. The demograpics of our prison system would suggest that there's probably a fair amount of justice in instances of black-on-black crime.

That's not to say that the crime problems in places like Chicago and Baltimore are acceptable. Let's talk about some of the things that lead entire communities to rot in poverty, crime, and drugs. Read up on the redlining practices that deliberately (and legally until 1968) segregated America by building up a prosperous white suburbia while black communities were abandoned in inner cities, stripped of public funding because they were too poor to generate tax revenue, and in some cases split up by growing highway and interstate networks. When white Americans left the cities, they took education funding and jobs with them. They were given opportunities to invest in property and build equity (wealth) that were deliberately denied to most black families. When you have generations of kids attending neglected schools while living in poverty in neglected communities, what kind of opportunities are they going to have to build what you might consider a respectable life? When you abandon entire communities like that, yes, crime is going to skyrocket. And our response to these problems that WE helped create? More police and more prisons. We've spent too much time and resources treating the symptom, not the disease. Meanwhile, white folks are starting to move back into the cities, trying to "reinvent" broken neighborhoods, but all they're doing is driving up the cost of rent and commodities and driving out the original residents that can no longer afford to live in the "reinvented" neighborhoods that they grew up in. So now the conversation is shifting to investing in affordable housing outside of urban areas, but NO, suburban white folks don't want that either. Keep those poor (predominantly non-white) people in the cities where they belong. Oh, they can't afford to live there anymore? Not my problem. THAT'S what we mean when we talk about systemic racism. THAT'S why affirmative action policies exist. THAT'S why people want to defund the police, because they only have those massive budgets because we spent decades defunding schools. Our society has come a long way since the days of Jim Crow, but there are still subtle forces at work trying to keep America segregated.

 

Edited by Godless

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3 hours ago, NeedleinA said:

The Top 5 Issues Facing Black Americans (7 minutes):
5. Victim Mentality
4. Lack of Diversity
3. Urban Terrorism
2. Proliferation of Baby Mamas
1. (watch the video)

 

I have not watched the video yet ( will later) but I would add one other issue - Politicians that delight in exploiting Blacks and Black suffering for their personal power and gain.  But not to appear too racists - I would add that such politicians will gladly delight in exploiting anyone that believes anything provided by the government is free.

 

The Traveler

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21 hours ago, Godless said:

The protests aren't just about death, they're about justice. The demograpics of our prison system would suggest that there's probably a fair amount of justice in instances of black-on-black crime.

I think we can all agree that it is wrong when justice is not applied equally.  Despite that, the people who complain about the injustice and the people who lead the cities with high black on black crime and high black death and murder rates all tend to be Democrats and leftists.  It is inconsistent to complain about something while continuing to elect leaders who have consistently failed to take meaningful or beneficial action.

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4 hours ago, person0 said:

I think we can all agree that it is wrong when justice is not applied equally.  Despite that, the people who complain about the injustice and the people who lead the cities with high black on black crime and high black death and murder rates all tend to be Democrats and leftists.  It is inconsistent to complain about something while continuing to elect leaders who have consistently failed to take meaningful or beneficial action.

One of the biggest areas of contention on the left is the viability of the Democratic Party as a useful vehicle of meaningful progress in the black communities*. Even if the Dems win the White House and both houses of Congress, that isn't going to go away. Some white people may stop talking about it, but it will come back to bite them in the next election cycle. The Democratic Party is going to face a reckoning at some point. Either they'll continue to disenfranchise black voters by trying to be "GOP-Lite" for the sake of white moderates, or they'll actively promote candidates that can stimulate real progress in helping black communities. And believe me, those candidates are out there. The biggest obstacle will be getting the old guard white Dems on board. The rift between them and black voters is ever-widening and it's probably the only thing keeping the GOP in play at this point.

*To be clear, there's a pretty strong consensus that the GOP is the greater of two evils on this issue. 

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Since it was mentioned by several here AND also happens to be in the video posted above.
The #1 issue facing black Americans, per the video, is:

Quote

Problem #1.  Unquestioning Allegiance to so-called Progressive Policies

Unwavering loyalty to progressive, liberal policies is the primary reason these dire conditions persist. It both makes them possible and perpetuates them. It’s no coincidence that progressivism is the common thread that binds predominately black cities where single-parent homes, failing schools, rampant poverty and crime predominate.

Look at cities like Detroit, Philadelphia and Baltimore. They’ve been run by progressive Democrats for decades. If their liberal policies were at all effective, these cities should have become models of economic growth and prosperity. Instead, they’re models of dysfunction. By fostering and exploiting the victim mentality, discouraging self-examination, subsidizing baby-mamas, and making excuses for black thugs, so-called progressive policies don’t alleviate the problems that afflict the black community, they aggravate those problems.

You may have noticed that racism did not make the list.  Why not? It’s simple: There will be no solution to the problems afflicting black America until more blacks recognize that the issues plaguing our community are ultimately self-inflicted.

Does racism exist? Sure. But there are other problems far more serious. And waiting until there are no more racists will mean waiting, and making excuses, forever.

 

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6 hours ago, Godless said:

*To be clear, there's a pretty strong consensus that the GOP is the greater of two evils on this issue.  

Despite the commonly held 'consensus', I am more than confident that conservative policies are far superior for the purposes of improving the lives of black Americans than are the policies in place and promoted by the left.

Edited by person0

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10 hours ago, Godless said:

One of the biggest areas of contention on the left is the viability of the Democratic Party as a useful vehicle of meaningful progress in the black communities*. 

*To be clear, there's a pretty strong consensus that the GOP is the greater of two evils on this issue. 

Yeah, I had to respond to this too.

The Right's answer to meaningful progress in black communities: "Keep government out of your way, so you can lift yourselves up."  

The Left's answer to meaningful progress in black communities: "Elect us and we'll fix your ills via wealth transfer,  affirmative action, etc.  More government will fix your problems for you!"

I know which solution I figure works better.  It's the solution that works better regardless of race/class/income/education/any demographic.

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UPDATE: I contacted the Church via Messenger and asked them the same questions as I posted above.  After submitting my questions to higher authorities, the official response was essentially a refusal to affirm that President Oaks intended to convey the messages that I believed could be interpreted.

Screenshot:

1534959729_Screenshot_20201101-2141342.thumb.png.40c6cbf1364aa785cba5fdeea0052ec6.png

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16 hours ago, NeuroTypical said:

Yeah, I had to respond to this too.

The Right's answer to meaningful progress in black communities: "Keep government out of your way, so you can lift yourselves up."  

Ah yes, the libertarian approach. I've always thought that small gov't philosophy was something that looked great on paper, but falls apart in practice. The way I see it, two things need to be true in order for libertarianism to truly work:

1. Racism and other forms of prejudice cannot exist. At all. That isn't the world we live in. We had prejudice codified into our nation's fabric at nearly every institutional level long after slavery was abolished. People alive today were protested and assaulted as children for walking into a "white" school. People alive today were kicked out of restaurants, told where they could sit on a bus, and denied opportunities to invest in property. And many of the people on the giving end of that prejudice are still alive today as well. Some of them have government jobs. Some of them are doctors, or bankers, or real estate agents. And most of them probably have kids who may or may not be following in their parents' footsteps.

2. Access to educational and financial resouces need to be equal. We don't live in that world either. Race aside, a kid from a poor family who was educated in an underfunded inner-city school isn't going to have the same opportunities as a kid from a middle class family in the suburbs. Are there exceptions? Of course. Some people are able to break the poverty cycle and build a better life for themselves. And they often have to overcome tremendous social and financial obstacles in the process. Those obstacles exist because our society spent decades determining which groups of people were worth investing in and which ones weren't. If realization of the "American Dream" was a foot race, some people in this country would have a 50 yard head start.

A while back, I stumbled across an excellent explanation of the problems of libertarianism. It's long, but worth reading.

https://twitter.com/drvox/status/1284565269277360128?s=19

Highlights: 

 

Screenshot_20201102-115719_Twitter.jpg

20201102_120654.jpg

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I didn't say "remove government restrictions".    I said "keep government out of the way", but I admit my brief summary lent itself to easy misunderstanding.    Of course there's a valid role for govt in regulation, ensuring equal playing fields, combating unjust discrimination, etc.  The left figures the best solutions often spring from government, the right figures the best solutions spring from individuals, families, maybe communities.  

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20 hours ago, Godless said:

Ah yes, the libertarian approach. I've always thought that small gov't philosophy was something that looked great on paper, but falls apart in practice. The way I see it, two things need to be true in order for libertarianism to truly work:

There is a difference between "libertarian" and "free market".  The free market is a component of libertarianism. 

There is also a difference between "libertarian" and "anarchist." Libertarian means knowing the "propeer role of government" vs the anarchist: "we should never know the government is even there."

Quote

1. Racism and other forms of prejudice cannot exist. At a ll. That isn't the world we live in. We had prejudice codified into our nation's fabric at nearly every institutional level long after slavery was abolished. People alive today were protested and assaulted as children for walking into a "white" school. People alive today were kicked out of restaurants, told where they could sit on a bus, and denied opportunities to invest in property. And many of the people on the giving end of that prejudice are still alive today as well. Some of them have government jobs. Some of them are doctors, or bankers, or real estate agents. And most of them probably have kids who may or may not be following in their parents' footsteps.

Wrong.  Racism is not what prevents people from rising out of poverty.  It is the victim mindset.  Have you ever wondered why Asians rise out of poverty within just a couple of generations?  Many people get the wrong idea.  "They're just smarter than everyone else" -- so say many liberals.  No, that's not racist <_<.  It is because, in spite of being ridiculed, passed over, and assaulted on a regular basis for generally being smaller than other races, they are also told that they have abilities (being smarter than everyone else).  That one difference gives Asians the idea that they are NOT VICTIMS.

Black people certainly have the racist stick shoved harder and deeper than any other race (with the possible exception of Jews) but the most devastating part of their plight is not the prejudice.  It is the victim mindset.  Jews never bought into the victim mindset even in the midst of the Holocaust.  That is why they were successful again within one generation after the war.  They WOULD NOT BUY INTO THE VICTIM MENTALITY.

If you really want to help Black people, STOP TELLING THEM THEY ARE VICTIMS.  Start telling them that they only need the desire, drive, love, family, and God to succeed and 98% of the time they can lift themselves out of poverty in one generation.  They can reach the 1% within two to three generations.

Quote

2. Access to educational and financial resouces need to be equal. We don't live in that world either. Race aside, a kid from a poor family who was educated in an underfunded inner-city school isn't going to have the same opportunities as a kid from a middle class family in the suburbs. Are there exceptions? Of course.

No, they are not exceptions.  People come out of poverty within one generation if they follow three rules:

1) Graduate High School (or GED).
2) Get a job.
3) Don't have children out of wedlock.

With those three qualities, you have a 98% success rate.  And NONE of them require more money than a person on welfare has.

You seem to have the common liberal assumption that if government doesn't do it, then it doesn't get done.  No, there are many other sources that people can get education and financial resources to become successful.

As far as access to education: Who doesn't have access to internet today?  If not at home, they can go to the library and get it.  With that, they have all the access they need for a great education.  My son has virtually no college education (only about 10 credit hours) and is making over $50k/yr because he got training online (total cost $35).  He was homeschooled through the internet most of his life.  Many other people I know were able to get online training with similar or better results.

Whatever the deficiency is on education, it isn't about access.

Financial resources would be nice.  But they are not necessary.  My dad's business started failing about the time I was in high school.  He didn't pay for my college education.  I was so poor that I gave up my apartment and was homeless for a while.  Yes, it would have been nice if I had more financial resources.  But I still made it happen because I had drive and the belief I could do it. I WAS NOT A VICTIM.

Quote

Some people are able to break the poverty cycle and build a better life for themselves. And they often have to overcome tremendous social and financial obstacles in the process. Those obstacles exist because our society spent decades determining which groups of people were worth investing in and which ones weren't. If realization of the "American Dream" was a foot race, some people in this country would have a 50 yard head start.

Yes, they do.  My great-grandparents came here with nothing.  Then my grandparents got further.  Then my parents went further.

I think the problem is that you're expecting that everyone should become rich in one generation.  That is a myth.  I don't know who sold you that box of goodies.  But they're poison.  And to tell people that if they don't become millionaires in one generation, "then they are victims" is a poisonous myth that does more harm to minorities than any racism that is common today.

Quote

 Are there exceptions? Of course.

There certainly are.  We have stories of people becoming billionaires within a year or two.  Do you really expect everyone to have that?  No? Then stop basing all your arguments on that assumption.

I'm going to say a bit more about the victim mentality.

The main reason I am a success is because of my Patriarchal Blessing.  No matter what else happened in my life that put me down -- (remember this is a guy who suffered from depression most of his life) there was one thing that told me that I would be successful -- my patriarchal blessing.

There was a part in there about my mission in life and about the field of work I'd go into.  That gave me a vision.  I knew that was what my Heavenly Father wanted me to do.  I knew that He would open doors for me even if everyone else in the world seemed to hate me.  My PB told me I had many talents and abilities even when just about everyone told me how much I messed up at everything and told me I'd never do x, y, or z.

My PB told me I was not a victim.  Today, I'm at the top of my profession.  I WAS NOT A VICTIM because I refused to buy into that mentality -- because I had God.

Edited by Carborendum

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18 minutes ago, Carborendum said:

That gave me a vision.  I knew that was what my Heavenly Father wanted me to do.

I just gave a HC talk last month about this very subject.

Understanding the plan that our Father in Heaven has for us "expands our vision". Vision = Hope. Hope = Motivation.

God gave both Moses and Joseph Smith Visions... for the purpose of "expanding their vision".
Victim mentality produces a lack of vision/possibilites, lack of hope, lack of motivation.

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From Black Lives Matter website, a new letter to Biden/Harris:

Quote

November 9, 2020

...We worked long and hard to ensure we did all we could to vote Donald Trump out of the White House — we succeeded.
That’s why Black Lives Matter sent a letter to President-Elect Joe Biden and Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris requesting a meeting with them both to discuss the expectations that we have for their administration and the commitments that must be made to Black people.

6216871_052820-kabc-4am-blm-protest-CC-vid.thumb.jpg.88f3470f1df0acce1b5cbaa4d94a3820.jpg

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