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JohnsonJones

Updates on renovations of the Salt Lake and Manti Temples

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Salt Lake Manti Temples Update

It appears that there will be more changes to these temples.  There no longer will be a Live Presentation Endowment, The Murals are removed, more single rooms added for additional ordinances, another Baptistry, and more sealing rooms.

Before we hear the bulk of complaints, I have heard it already about history and the destruction of historic items.  As a Historian, I am normally greatly saddened when historic things are erased.  I understand why some may be saddened by this.

HOWEVER...

1.  This is not without precedent.  There have been other temples in Utah that have been renovated and the murals changed or removed.

2.  Ask oneself what the purpose of the temple is.  First and Foremost it is about the ordinances performed there-in.  Which pushes the work forward more, enabling the ability to perform more ordinances or the preservation of historic value here.

3.  In strengthening the temple against earthquakes, the walls of which the murals were on needed to be changed.  There did not appear to be a way to preserve the murals and do the best job of making the temple more earthquake resistant at the same time.

4.  I hear that this is divinely inspired.  If the Prophet feels that this is the correct thing to do to press forward in the work of the Lord, who are we to question that?

 

Just pre-empting some conversational pointers I think some may raise before they are raised here, or expressing my thoughts prior to others expressing theirs so I am not responding, rather just putting my opinion up front and center to begin with.

Edited by JohnsonJones

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A few follow-ups observations, re Salt Lake specifically:

1). The Church presumably had a plan about what accessibility/layout changes it intended to make, at the time the temple was closed.  At the time, it announced that the murals would be preserved.  I believe that this statement was sincere.  

2).  These murals were painted directly on late-19th/early-20th century plaster, which is notoriously difficult to preserve.

3).  It sounds to me like the murals—at least in Salt Lake—turned out to be far more fragile than anyone imagined; and heaven only knows how last year’s earthquake may have exacerbated matters.  Once it becomes apparent that the murals, as a practical matter, cannot be saved and that the result of any renovation/“restoration” at this point would to some degree be historically inauthentic, then you have to ask hard questions about whether it’s worth the extra cost and limited temple capacity to provide the relatively tiny amount of Church members who regularly use this temple with a pseudo-historical experience on top of the spiritual experience that is the temple’s raison d’etre.

4). The murals in the temple had been retouched many, many times.  It is difficult to say what is or isn’t “authentic” at this point.  Moreover, several are not original to the temple as-built, having been done in 1915 or later.

5). As for those that were original—neither the circumstances under which they were produced, nor the craftsmanship thereof, sanctify the temple.  To the contrary, it was their presence in the temple that sanctified them.  They are not “pioneer” work; the painters were second-generation Church members who were sent to Europe to study art at Church expense, and then got in a rather unseemly spitting match with President Woodruff over the amount he was willing to pay them for the murals versus the amount the artists thought they were worth.  Additionally, they also—to my mind at least—are not particularly “high art”.  The murals being done at present for new temples, far exceed them in artistry and aesthetic appeal.  The only thing I’ll miss about the murals, is that I dare say the all-seeing eye will not be present in whatever replaces them.

6). I love live sessions.  Have learned a ton through them.  That said:  most of the loss was suffered when we chose to do video rather than live presentations for the hundred-plus temples in the Church.  Live sessions are a horrendously inefficient, labor-intensive way to administer the Endowment; and it probably isn’t fair for “old-guard” Mormons in Utah (of which I count myself one) to demand the consumption of Church resources on something that the vast majority of the Church will never be able to enjoy.  It is telling to me that some of the same people decrying the loss of live sessions and pooh-poohing the observation that these new changes will *double* the Salt Lake Temple’s working capacity, are the same folks who are forever complaining about why we don’t spend more money on “the poor” and wondering whether the Church really needs another temple in Utah.  

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2 minutes ago, Carborendum said:

I don't know of anyone who has stopped in the hallways of the temple to simply stand and appreciate any of the murals.

I assumed they were talking about the ordinance room murals.

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19 minutes ago, Vort said:

I assumed they were talking about the ordinance room murals.

OK.  My mistake.  I don't know of anyone who spent much time looking at ANY of the murals or expressing appreciation for them.  Obviously, you're an exception.

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20 hours ago, Just_A_Guy said:

Additionally, they also—to my mind at least—are not particularly “high art”.  The murals being done at present for new temples, far exceed them in artistry and aesthetic appeal.

Eve's leg: Am I a joke to you?

Adam-and-Eve%2BStained-Glass.jpg.jpg&key

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51 minutes ago, mordorbund said:

Eve's leg: Am I a joke to you?

I've tried to figure out Eve's leg in the past. Best I can figure out is the following, which makes sense... BUT is nonetheless just awkward in the piece of art.
Untitled-1.jpg.b7ae9676936d3103f4e3d2616f737b1d.jpg

Edited by NeedleinA

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I am both sad and excited about the changes.  I have had a number of my most spiritual manifestations while at the Salt Lake temple which have been linked to physical presentations and structures at the temple that though not specifically referenced are likely to be changed.  My general feeling is that, to me, the Salt Lake Temple is a spiritual reminder that our past is really a link to our future and that things; I thought would never change are changing - perhaps I need to make changes to myself to prepare for my personal spiritual seismic protection and other things that are coming.  

 

The Traveler

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