For Mirkwood


Carborendum
 Share

Recommended Posts

@mirkwood

I don't know if you've been informed.  But apparently a group of film makers have been chomping at the bit for the movie rights for Winnie the Pooh have finally expired into the public domain.

The result of years of planning have resulted in the following:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bs-fkqZDZ_0

At first I thought it was one of those Funny or Die parodies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_CXKceIE7M

But I looked it up.  It is a real movie.  Go figure.

Edited by Carborendum
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This movie looks so awful.  No interest at all from me. 

I saw out of 576,000 people that viewed it on YouTube only about 7,300 people gave it a thumbs up.  Hopefully the film bombs.

Edited by Still_Small_Voice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Still_Small_Voice said:

I saw out of 576,000 people that viewed it on YouTube only about 7,300 people gave it a thumbs up.  Hopefully the film bombs.

??? I looked through about five trailers.  All of them had a few thousand likes and no dislikes.  I'm not saying it is going to be a huge success.  But so far, I see it as #13 on IMDB's level of interest scale.

Fun commentary:

Quote

Hi, i'm a time traveler from year 2055. Honestly, everyone forgot that Winnie the Pooh has been a cartoon character. We all know him from the slasher series. Now, i'm off to see "Winnie the Pooh X: Honey in space", see you later!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/5/2022 at 1:56 PM, Carborendum said:

??? I looked through about five trailers.  All of them had a few thousand likes and no dislikes.  I'm not saying it is going to be a huge success.  But so far, I see it as #13 on IMDB's level of interest scale.

 

They disabled a normal user's access to view dislikes on YouTube.  I think it is because certain people were trying to push a narrative on YouTube and a large part of the common population was rejecting it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/5/2022 at 1:56 PM, Carborendum said:

??? I looked through about five trailers.  All of them had a few thousand likes and no dislikes.

Well, I became the first. :)  

image.png.5891e3dd6ab5a1242a16c033e4205722.png

Some YT vids allow a count of likes and dislikes, but when you don't see a number, it's because they've blocked the count display.  @Still_Small_Voice's analysis is relevant: 1.2% of the people who have viewed the video hit like.

BTW, The works of A.A. Milne entered the public domain last year.  That's why this movie is happening now.  If someone wanted, they could produce and sell a movie that shows Tigger getting baptized and eventually becoming an Elder. 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Still_Small_Voice said:

 

They disabled a normal user's access to view dislikes on YouTube.  I think it is because certain people were trying to push a narrative on YouTube and a large part of the common population was rejecting it.

Disclaimer: YouTube owes me money.

What happened was that after the first Ghostbusters 2016 trailer got down-voted harder than malaria the "good and proper" crowd started getting the vapors over the presence of the down vote button. When an annual end-of-year video by YouTube itself got down-voted even harder than that Ghostbusters trailer, it was the beginning of the end. 

Removing down votes kept people from seeing how unpopular something actually was, and they wanted it that way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, NeuroTypical said:

BTW, The works of A.A. Milne entered the public domain last year.  That's why this movie is happening now.  If someone wanted, they could produce and sell a movie that shows Tigger getting baptized and eventually becoming an Elder. 

Pooh porn is inevitable. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/12/2022 at 11:37 AM, NeuroTypical said:

Well, I became the first. :)  

BTW, The works of A.A. Milne entered the public domain last year.  That's why this movie is happening now.  If someone wanted, they could produce and sell a movie that shows Tigger getting baptized and eventually becoming an Elder. 

Not quite.

The first book is public domain, but the others still have a few years to go and all things Disney are under their own copyrights. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Vort said:

Pooh porn is inevitable. :(

I say this as an entertainment writer - 

As noted by the so-called "Internet Rule 34", or just "Rule 34", the more popular a given franchise is, the more likely it is that one will find "adult" content based on it. 

In the vast majority of instances, the material in question is created by third parties for the consumption of third parties. Material produced by people who actually worked on a given franchise is rare and often done without authorization, such as material produced by disgruntled ex-employees or employees looking to make a quick buck. Only a small percentage is created by - or with the sanction of - actual rights-holders. 

The phenomenon actually pre-dates the internet, with female fans of certain 1970s rock bands developing a particular reputation for producing this kind of content. Rather, the internet has made it easier for this kind of material to circulate. 

Many content producers have a rule that they don't pay attention to fan creations under normal circumstances, the result of them fearing legal action if they make something too closely resembling materials produced by fans. As a consequence, unless something forces them to pay attention they just let it all slide. Because of this, it is actually quite easy to find "adult" content that's based on a wide variety of intellectual properties, even properties aimed at children; this is why it is so vital that parents and grandparents have an understanding of what kids are doing online. 

I myself actually once encountered a counter-cult minister who delighted in writing and posting obscene limericks based on religious figures he didn't like. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, Ironhold said:

Many content producers have a rule that they don't pay attention to fan creations under normal circumstances, the result of them fearing legal action if they make something too closely resembling materials produced by fans. As a consequence, unless something forces them to pay attention they just let it all slide.

I've gotten a huge kick out of various fandom creations (the innocent kind, not the "adult content" kind) since the '90's.  My earliest forays onto online communities were the old usenet groups.  Plenty of Star Trek fan fiction to go around.  One was so memorable I snuck into my high-school's computer lab to print it out: A crossover between ST:TNG and The Muppet Show :) .   Miss Piggy exchanging flirty lines at the dance with a disinterested and uncomfortable Riker - absolute gold. 

I've followed probably a hundred or more aspiring artists/authors/music writers that basically create stuff in existing franchises.  On occasion, one of them gets good enough at it, they earn a Cease and Desist letter from the IP owners.  It's like a badge of honor for an aspiring artist to get contacted by Disney's lawyers demanding they knock it off. 

Anyway, I hear @mirkwood and @LDSGator like to cosplay as Abba at comicons.  

ABBA Group Costume -

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, NeuroTypical said:

I've followed probably a hundred or more aspiring artists/authors/music writers that basically create stuff in existing franchises.  On occasion, one of them gets good enough at it, they earn a Cease and Desist letter from the IP owners.  It's like a badge of honor for an aspiring artist to get contacted by Disney's lawyers demanding they knock it off. 

 

Disney's lawyers are infamous for filing suits over things that most companies wouldn't bother even paying attention to. For example, they once sued a day care because the day care had a mural on the inside of the building that featured Disney characters. Only workers, kids, and parents would have likely ever seen it. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Pirates

The most infamous bit so far is the years-long legal suit against the Air Pirates underground comic book group. The group published an adults-only parody of Disney that by all rights *should* have fallen under "Fair Use" as parody, but Disney and the head of the group got punch-drunk and kept going years after it should have been obvious that nothing of value was going to come out of it. 

Disney claimed it as a win for protecting the image and reputation of their characters, the head of the group and many others on the indie comics scene at the time saw it as a victory for free speech and parody, and just about everyone else wished the whole thing had never happened. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share