anatess2

Learn Bisaya (for SpiritDragon)

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@SpiritDragon is giving us Health and Fitness advice.  I want to give back for the time he took out of his life to help us.  So, I'm sharing some Bisaya words so hopefully by the end of the year, you can be like @unixknight with his Russian and can find the US Embassy from Davao or Cebu!

42 minutes ago, anatess2 said:

And for your Bisaya vocabulary... next time you exercise, you count like this:

Usa, Duha, Tulo, Upat, Lima, Unom, Pito, Walo, Siyam, Napu^.

There is only one way to pronounce all the letters in the Bisaya alphabet.  So here's the pronounciation:

A - like ahhh.
E - like Set
I - like Sit
O - like the first O in Octopus 
U - like Impromptu

the ^ symbol for Napu is an accent.  It has that gulping sound you make when you say, huh.  So you pronounce Napu (Ten) as Nah-puh.

P.S.  I'm teaching you "street Bisaya" not formal Bisaya which nobody uses except for high-faluting politicians giving speeches and such.

 

 

 

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@anatess2 this is really sweet of you. I have to say that my primary consideration in language right now is improving english. I'm starting with increasing vocabulary and then I'd like to take some courses to improve grammar. The fact of the matter is that I'm not actually too keen on learning Bisaya at this time. That may change at some point and if so I hope I can come to you at that time, but for the time being let me save you the time giving me lessons that I'm not ready for.

Thanks so much though. I really appreciate your desire to give back. The best gift you can give back for the help offered in the weight loss thread is to stay accountable and get your health back this year.

Happy New Year!

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I think there are three words/phrases from my, admittedly even on the mission, limited Ilanggo that I still use commonly.

(Note: spelling is certainly horrific. It wasn't a "written" language at the time, per se)

1. Diritso pa

   Meaning: Continue straight.

   My wife and I say this to each other when driving and giving directions.

2. Punko

    Meaning: Sit

3. Bulan

   Meaning: Moon

 

That's it.

I remember other words/phrases. But I don't use any commonly except those listed here.

 

Oh...we still sing "Dutay nga dumang" (Eensy Weensy Spider) in broken/made up half-Tagolog half-Ilonggo.

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6 minutes ago, The Folk Prophet said:

I think there are three words/phrases from my, admittedly even on the mission, limited Ilanggo that I still use commonly.

(Note: spelling is certainly horrific. It wasn't a "written" language at the time, per se)

1. Diritso pa

   Meaning: Continue straight.

   My wife and I say this to each other when driving and giving directions.

2. Punko

    Meaning: Sit

3. Bulan

   Meaning: Moon

 

That's it.

I remember other words/phrases. But I don't use any commonly except those listed here.

 

Oh...we still sing "Dutay nga dumang" (Eensy Weensy Spider) in broken/made up half-Tagolog half-Ilonggo.

Interestingly, all those 3 words/phrases in Ilonggo are the exact same in Bisaya with a few caveats:

2.  Pungko is the exact same for sit but in Bisaya there are many ways to say sit depending on how you sat.  Pungko is actually squatting kind of sit.  Lingkod is the regular sit (like on a chair).

3. Bulan is also the exact same but Bisaya people are lazy.  L is too much work sandwiched between vowels so it's only used for formal speeches and such.  We say Buwan on the street (like the L is silent).  The Ilonggos are not as lazy so they pronounce all the L's.

Edited by anatess2

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1 minute ago, anatess2 said:

Interestingly, all those 3 words/phrases in Ilonggo are the exact same in Bisaya with a few caveats:

2.  Pungko is the exact same for sit but in Bisaya there are many ways to say sit depending on how you sat.  Pungko is actually squatting kind of sit.  Lingkod is the regular sit (like on a chair).

3. Bulan is also the exact same but Bisaya people are lazy.  L is too much work so it's only used for formal speeches and such.  We say Buwan on the street (like the L is silent).

Bulan is the one we say the most. Whenever we see the moon one of us points (usually me) and says "bulan". Haha.

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Lesson 2 for those interested:

Colors (Kolo'r in Bisaya... the accent is on the 2nd syllable).

Red - Puwa (formally Pula, but we're lazy so we skip the L)

Black - Itom

White - Puti

And that's all you need to know.  Because, nobody ever uses the Bisaya words for the rest of the colors (if there's even anybody that remembers what they are).  The rest of the colors are in English.

Edited by anatess2

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