The Folk Prophet

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Everything posted by The Folk Prophet

  1. The Folk Prophet

    Stewardship vs Trust vs Joe-Schmoe

    No. Unless it's a father's blessing, or the bishops blessing is actually within his stewardship like setting someone apart. A generic blessing is not the bishops stewardship any more than anyone other priesthood holder's.
  2. The Folk Prophet

    Stewardship vs Trust vs Joe-Schmoe

    The question itself seems flawed. Why don't friends, etc. have stewardship to give me blessings? [note: they do]
  3. The Folk Prophet

    Trying to have spiritual experiences

    This is silly on a few levels. A. What does reading it "all the way" through have to do with the promise given? B. The Lord's promises are the Lord's promises and He will fulfill them. C. The promise is not "if you read it all the way through you'll have a spiritual experience". It is, that when we read these things if we: remember how merciful the Lord hath been unto the children of men ponder it in our hearts. ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if these things are not true ask with a sincere heart, with real intent, having faith in Christ And if we do those things, He promises that He will manifest the truth of it unto us, by the power of the Holy Ghost. Period. He will manifest the truth of it unto us by the power of the Holy Ghost. If He does not it is because we haven't done our part. So what is our part? It's obedience. ALL blessings (including spiritual confirmation of truth) are predicated upon obedience to law. If we obey, we will have spiritual experiences. So in that regard, I think there's a level of merit (sort of) to the suggestion that we stop seeking spiritual experiences....sort of. But not really though. It's a matter of focus. For example, if your objective is to drive to the store, then to say you should stop worrying about driving to the store to drive to the store makes little sense. But if you're unable to drive to the store, then it's probably reasonable to ask why you cannot. Is the car out of gas? Is it otherwise broken? Do we know how to drive? Is a road built that goes to the store? Etc., etc. The spiritual experience is the means whereby we know God. It is imperative. We should seek it above all else. But..... that means looking at the how of it. What is the how of it? I'll restate: Obedience. So, yeah. Focus on obedience to that end, instead of merely that end. There's some validity in that idea. To just cast of spiritual experiences as unimportant is severely flawed though.
  4. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I watched West Side Story and Fiddler on the Roof back to back last week. I can't decide which is the better movie musical. But this much I can say. They are, without a doubt, top 2 in my opinion. Objectively The Sound of Music is as good a movie musical...but less my cup o' tea....er....cocoa...I mean cup o' cocoa. If I had to choose though, I think I'd have to put West Side Story as my #1. Fiddler is phenomenal. Maybe even objectively better. It's deeper in meaning. It's filmed better (for the most part). More grounded. Less...gang-members-doing-ballet-y (which I don't hate...but....objectively....I get the critique....). But I just like West Side Story. I'm really interested in what Stephen Spielberg does with his upcoming remake. I'm talking movie musicals. Stage musicals I'm more of a Les Miz, Miss Saigon fan. But the movie of Les Miz was, perhaps, the biggest piece of junk movie musical ever made. When it comes to Sondheim, I also quite love Sweeney Todd and Into the Woods, but really only know them from the recordings, having never seen them on stage. I've seen the movies, and although Sweeney Todd is one of the better recent movie musicals, it pales compared to stage versions where the singers can actually sing. (Speaking of which, I recently came across the version with Michael Ball and Imelda Staunton. Wow! But I've been thinking and wondering... Up and into the 70s movie musicals were, in my opinion, oft times stronger than the stage versions. Now I can't directly compare to the stage versions of yesteryear, having not been alive then, but I can to the stage versions of them I've seen. And even if they didn't completely out class the stage versions, they were still really well made, good renditions of musicals. Oklahoma, South Pacific, The Sound of Music, Man of La Mancha, the afore mentioned West Side Story and Fiddler on the Roof. These are solid interpretations of musical adapted to a movie. Since the 1980s movie musicals STINK. There are rare entries that are okay-ish. But way inferior to their stage counterparts. The most egregious of these being the Tom Hooper versions of Les Miz and CATS and the awful version of Phantom. To be fair, CATS is a garbage musical anyway, in my opinion. But the movie is even worse, removing the primary meaning and plot of the stage show.* Phantom is also a terrible musical but with some wonderful, wonderful music that almost saves it. As a soundtrack it does save it. So what do they do for the movie version... ruin the ONE thing it has going for it by casting a lead that can't sing or perform the part correctly! Seriously!? There are exceptions. As I said, Sweeney Todd was well adapted. Chicago was great (though not to my personal tastes). Into the Woods was okay-ish (some disagree...it was, in some ways, pretty gutted... but that's a longer conversation that I won't go into.) But why? Why can't they adapt musicals to movies any more with any level of proficiency? It's frustrating to me. What changed? Or do I simply see the "olden day" movie musicals through rose colored glasses? * Edit: The CATS movie, however, for some reason is a bit of a guilty pleasure. Something about it was actually enjoyable. Not enough that I'd own it or watch it regularly...but....
  5. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    Argumentatively true... I say "argumentatively" because I would argue that with modern CGI capabilities that there's little difference between what one could do with animation and live action. The formulas aren't fully translatable yet, but they should be. There's clearly a block in movie-folk's mind on the matter. An example of this can be seen in Sonic. The original preview had a "realistic" sonic to try and match the real life. When they got terrible feedback, they cartooned him up, and it worked, rather well I think. Yes, the expressions of the reindeer in Frozen might be problematic to translate...but otherwise, what about that movie couldn't be live action? And why couldn't it work just as well in every way if it was? Frozen II as well. Additionally...if you took Les Miz and didn't do the two things that ruined it (putting star power above singing prowess, and having them sing live on set when filming) then it could have been fantastic. There's nothing problematic about it otherwise, really. That was less about the movie folk not having the right formula as it was about them not understanding that that specific musical needs great singing above all else. Alternatively, Sweeney Todd worked wonders without great singers -- because Sondheim isn't a singers song writer, partially. Sweeney Todd captured the formula pretty well, I'd say. So did Into the Woods, actually. The live action-ness of these didn't do anything to hurt suspension of disbelief. Granted, these are sung-through musicals. And that, in my book, works a charm both live action and on stage to the acceptance of story through song. (Basically, it's opera.) I think Miss Saigon could absolutely kill as a Movie. Gritty, live action, Viet Nam era with full on singing throughout. They were planning on doing it. I'm not sure if they are any longer. Of course it might suffer the Sweeney Todd problem of ending up being R-rated, which is not a good thing for a musical any way you cut it. (It's annoying to me that every version of the Miss Saigon (in recording and staging) has gotten progressively raunchier. Anyhow, I think you left out Man of La Mancha and Scrooge from your working 70s movie musicals exceptions. Of course maybe those weren't big enough hits and that's what you mean by "working". If you mean working as in actually work even if they don't sell as well then they need to be included. (Scrooge has a few flaws, but overall, it works quite well, imo. But I may be biased by sentiment.) Edit: As I said earlier too, I'm hoping Stephen Spielberg's West Side Story version cracks the code.
  6. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

  7. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I've seen that clip. I don't fully agree with Ashman on the point though. Even more-so with modern CGI capabilities. It does take a different approach to pull it off in live action though (see the live action Lion King as a primary example how to not pull it off...though I'm not sure the singing was the problem there...). And it is, perhaps, more challenging -- maybe... I think probably just "different" challenging. But really the part I disagree with is that suspension of disbelief that a fish can talk is the same suspension of disbelief that's required to accept people bursting into song or that the one correlates to the other (though I grant that the expectation of music in an animated film might be higher). Moreover, live action movie musicals were highly successful and there are many examples of them working very well before The Little Mermaid came along. I'm not saying I don't understand his preference to sign on to animation. And credit due. Ashman was the genius behind the Disney Renaissance. But really the problem of suspension of disbelief in a musical is a cultural thing. No one had a problem with it in the 40s, 50s, or 60s. By the 80s it was passé and kids weren't buying into it. That's a cultural result derived from various things. But it's not indicative of the medium itself being a problem as to suspension of disbelief. Ashman may or may not have been plugged into that idea. Really though (and this is my actual disagreement), accepting a musical as a form of entertainment is not about suspension of disbelief. That's a bit of a semantic argument because, of course, by literal definition one could make the argument it is. But it's different. It's not the same as, "You'll believe a man can fly!" No on believes someone would burst into song. It's not belief they're suspending, even in the moment, in the same way it is buying into a fish talking. Music is expressionistic. It's representative. It's not a cold, hard thing happening in the same way a fish talking is. You aren't buying into a reality that people sing to each other in this world. You're letting the singing represent something else. (I know...semantics. Argumentative. But I think there's a reality to what I'm saying.......I think....that would serve those who create musical movies if they understood it. Ashman, for example, was adamant that the music started underneath the dialogue so the talking flowed into the song naturally. And that's fine as one approach. And it works well. But there are many fine examples of people breaking into song otherwise in movie musicals that have worked. And I don't think that's key to Under the Sea having worked. If Sebastian had said, "Ariel, listen to me. The human world is a mess. Life under the sea is better than anything they got up there..." and then the orchestra had kicked into the Caribbean rhythms as he took his place in front of a band and started singing would it REALLY have hurt the show much? I'm not saying it isn't better as is...but I'm contending maybe it's not as key to the song working as he implied....) That being said....I do get his point as a box one could work in to make life easier. I just think there's some definite outside the box thinking that is fully legitimate as well. Maybe. In other words, people whose primary critique of musicals is, "This is stupid. People would never break into singing and choreographed dance in real life" are missing the point by a long shot. If the musical creator is trying to sell that angle, they already failed. Thoughts?
  8. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I think that it depends on a multitude of factors and that there is no yes/no answer. I believe some are better as movies. West Side Story and Fiddler on the Roof are two examples. The stage versions lose something, in my opinion. Man of La Mancha is an interesting example that loses something in both forms. The stage loses the realism of the real inn and the gritty reality of real life. The film loses the creativity of the play within a play. The movie does that too...sort of. It's a play within a movie....but the play then is shown as reality....but it doesn't have the same, "that's clever" sort of feel, etc... Really though, it depends on so many factors. Some things work better as a stage play. Dance numbers are one example of that (usually). Dance numbers on stage usually work. Those same numbers in a movie can sometimes kill the show. But even when they don't, they still don't work as well as live. Live orchestra also has something about it that just can't really be recreated with a recording. You feel the timpani hits and the loud brass melts your face. Live orchestra is something to hear! Recordings don't translate -- ever. Even a small orchestra playing live can punch in ways that movie music can't. Alternatively, small orchestras can also stink, and a movie allows for a bigger orchestra and perfected takes. So...... It really just depends. Mostly though, I think skill is skill. The right director/producer/talent/etc. will sell a movie. The same is true of a stage play. People who understand the property and build it right for the medium in which it's being presented will create art. Most musical movie failures are failures of the creators, not the property.
  9. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    So, I've been kind of wondering how Steven Spielberg planned on improving West Side Story. In some ways, the original movie is put together very well. There's some obvious flaws, and I think fixing those is likely...but in some ways I wondered if it would just be "different" instead of better. But one way this trailer indicates he may have improved on it is in the "movie score" part of the movie. Like backing the dialogue scenes with big orchestral emotional stuff like in the trailer. That could really up the ante with the emotional punch. I also think the original missed the boat on the ending with the acting (or director's direction on acting) choices, and that will probably be more punchy too. And I expect the rumble to be more intense. And I know that Steven Spielberg will improve the overall cinematography and lighting and what have you, which in the original was hit and miss...sometimes great, and sometimes terrible (like the monochromatic lighting during the song Maria which just looks terrible.) Either way, I expect this to be a shining example of how to do musical films now-a-days correctly. I hope that's true, that it's a hit making tons of money, and it inspires other great musical movies to be made.
  10. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I watched the trailer for Diana: The Musical coming to Netflix. I hate it already.
  11. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I'm not familiar with it. I'm not a fan of Green Day. In that grunge rock world I'd go with The Offspring instead.
  12. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I'm not sure what tastes might overlap but just for fun here are some of my other favorites in the rock and or roll world. Metallica Queen White Zombie Rob Zombie Children of Bodom Meshuggah I like lots of styles of music here and there.
  13. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I've always secretly kind of wanted to write a heavy metal opera. But....I won't ever.
  14. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I think you'd be surprised. Don't get me wrong. The problem with rock in musicals to me is like pineapple on pizza. It just doesn't belong. Give me rock when I want rock. Give me musicals when I want musicals. That being said, it can work. I secretly really like Jesus Christ Superstar. I dislike the concept. I very much like the music.
  15. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    Well good golly if I didn't enjoy that a lot! I have some critiques. And it's not like...super high art...but... Okay...here's my detailed review. Music-wise it's up there pretty high for Andrew Lloyd Webber. I don't know that I'd put any one song in his top 10. But there were several solid good songs. And that's not typically typical. In fact, Phantom is unique in that regard, in that it has several great songs. But Cinderalla did too, darn it all. In fact, I'd handily and readily put this in his top 5. Out of 20, that's not bad. Now for the critiques: Well, for one, I dislike rock songs in musicals. I don't mind back beats entirely. They can work. But just straight up rock orchestrations....no. (One of my reasons for not loving The Greatest Showman, I'm sure.) Now, to be fair, I happen to know that some of the songs there were studio recordings and I don't know for sure if the orchestrations match. I suspect they do. But I don't know for sure. But, for example, the song Bad Cinderella would have been better with more of an orchestra-y orchestration instead of the rock one, in my opinion. It could have had some elements of that...sure. But...well...there it is. Secondly, the song The Vanquishing of the Three Headed Sea Witch was terrible. I mean talk about killing the show. It should have been a short snippet, nothing more. Even better, do a flash back in the start of the show where the prince sings a short snippet about going off to fight the sea witch, and then reprise it here. Keep them both short and recitative in style instead of the mind-numbingly long straight up rock and or roll style song -- which was.....okay. I mean it sounded like a Tenacious D song (meaning a parody of DIO or something...). I dunno. It'll probably be @LDSGator's favorite song in the show. Sung by Adam Lambert for the recording (though played by another in the show, apparently). But whether one likes the song or not...plot wise it killed the momentum badly. There were a few other songs that did that a bit too...but not too badly. Forgivably. Not that one though. Putting that aside, the ending was...quick. And simple. But it worked. I found myself satisfied. Very much so. So that works. Finally...and here's the kicker for me... I found myself emotional a few times in the show. It was moving in parts. That's a good, good thing in my book. I felt for the characters. It worked. Simple. But it worked. Now I do place it high for an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical, relatively. But that doesn't mean I place it that high overall. It's mediocre. It's fun. It works pretty well. I'll take it. But, I dunno. 3 out of 5 stars. Maybe.
  16. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    Andrew Lloyd's Webbers musical Cinderella, apparently, has the soundtrack available on Youtube (I assume elsewhere too). Act I: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqtDYZpzYwR_vIQlpo-ZcIsxLy5F0mCWw Act II: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqtDYZpzYwR9fAEzoYmG-7OfzOehd0_eu I'm not hopeful this musical will be one I love, but the prospect of a new musical from Andrew Lloyd Webber to check out is exciting. Listening......now.
  17. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    I agree. It wasn't terrible. But nothing super inspiring. I've only seen it once. I felt the This is Me song was a bit too on the nose progressive-leftist-gay-trans-whatever in intent. In a different culture maybe it wouldn't have come across that way. But.... There were a few musical moments and scenes I liked. I didn't hate the movie. But didn't love it. That's about all I can say, really.
  18. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    So I specifically searched for the term "Mozart" to find this post, and you edited it (clearly to be more concise) and removed that side comment, but since I remember you saying you thought Mozart was the top in your view. though even before you removed it I wasn't entirely sure if you meant the top classical or the top period. Anyhow, I watched Amadeus again last night and had some Mozart thoughts that were new so I hunted down your now removed comment to comment upon. The first new thought: I noted that I didn't care for a lot of the Mozart music. I don't know for sure, but generally speaking, the music gets better and better through the movie, which I think (like I said, I'm not sure) corresponds to Mozart earlier works vs later works. Now I am not familiar with all Mozart. Even being a music major and having studied music, he was just too prolific, so unless one studies Mozart specifically in detail...or is some sort of really crazed fan, no one is. That is to say, he produced over 600 works. Ouch. But my sense is that his later works are what I really love. Some of his earlier works...not so much. (Thought maybe the earlier/later thing is irrelevant.) So the thought was this...maybe Mozart wasn't as genius as I used to think...he just wrote so much, and had enough genius that some of it rose to the top. Without checking out all 600 of his works I can't say for sure, but I can say that I just don't care for some of his pieces in the movie Amadeus. Alternatively, some of the music is just gold. The other thought I had: Mozart died at the ripe ol' age of 35. And had produced that gold by then. And when I say gold, I mean GOLD. You'd said, as I mentioned, that you viewed Mozart as the best in your view (or something like that), and there is no question anywhere, that I'm aware of, that he was the best classical period composer. But the best of all genres, baroque, classical, romantic, 20th Century...well there's going to be some debate there. Though I'd guess that in most debates Mozart would still rise, easily, to the top 3 or 4, and a great many would place him in the number 1 spot (as I would -- I mean you've got Bach, Mozart and Beethoven clearly up there, probably Wagner and Stravinsky... I mean there's your top 5, right? Some debate...but yeah....I think so*). Considering that, his early death, and 1 other point is of interest to me. Mozart died in 1791. Had he lived to (for math's sake) 100 he would have died in 1856. That crosses right into Beethoven territory. Beethoven's 1st was in 1800 --- only 9 years after Mozart died! So....what if? Double Mozart's musical maturity...he dies at 70 or 80, having written 1200 works instead of the scant 600. He competes directly against Beethoven as well. What might he have written? I think it safe to say these things would have influenced him greatly. I think he would have likely moved into the Romantic style. It was what became popular. And I expect he would have felt competitive with Beethoven. Anyhow, just some interesting thoughts I had. Not actually commentary on your now removed comment...just commentary that sprang from having watched Amadeus and then recalling you'd said something. *These would be my "top" based on knowledge, not taste. Taste-wise I'd take Bach and Wagner out and probably put in....um....John Williams? This list is interesting. Puts Stravinsky at #1. Has Stephen Sondheim at #43 though...and the fact that it has John Cage on the list at all.... To be fair, it was only 174 composers who where surveyed, which means it really likely only took one idiot mentioning anyone and they make the list.
  19. I believe it is attributed to Albert Einstein. But I hate the saying: The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. Clearly Einstein never learned to play the piano.
  20. The Folk Prophet

    Condoms are flying off the shelves in TX!

    Just to be clear -- the exception that the Spirit legitimately reveals to someone always applies. I'm actually less stringent on things than I'm coming across I think. I think casual selfish abortion is an abomination. But I also understand that everyone will stand before God accountable for what they have done with their agency, and that abortion choices will play into that in a perfectly fair and just way. The church's official position is not a legal theory. I separate the two things in my mind.
  21. The Folk Prophet

    Musicals

    So I'm familiar with some of the music but I haven't ever seen it. On your recommendation I'll look into doing so.
  22. The Folk Prophet

    Condoms are flying off the shelves in TX!

    @Suzie, I am sorry. I think I have some historical hang-ups with you because of some of your progressive leaning views on things and, additionally, I think your communication style might not resonate with me or something. I mean, I don't even know...it's hard to put into words beyond the fact that if I'm legitimately honest with myself, I have to admit that I respond viscerally to your comments in a more defensive way than I would with others. That is not your fault, despite all my implications. I don't know that I shouldn't have explained that I felt your post was implying something unfair, but I absolutely, most certainly could have said it with a LOT more understanding, love, and forgiveness. Instead I was snarky and biting in my response. And then I doubled down on it with more snark and biting remarks, even though I said in my first post I wasn't going to say more. But I kept at it anyhow. I apologize, truly and deeply for all of that. Look, if you really don't want to interact with me moving forward that is fair. But I promise you that if you do in the future I will do better. I understand you might have blocked me already and may never see this. But I am really sorry. Please forgive me.
  23. The Folk Prophet

    Condoms are flying off the shelves in TX!

    Edit: @Suzie, I have reconsidered my culpability in this. So I'm removing my post here and I'll say more below.
  24. The Folk Prophet

    Condoms are flying off the shelves in TX!

    You cannot see that suggesting I'm saying rape victims are "just feeling bad" (you added the word just) would come across as passive aggressive and rude per the explanation I gave? Particularly when you literally ignored the next sentence where I explicitly clarified, "It would be a terrible thing to have to do. I'm not denying that"? You don't understand why I felt you were, perhaps, cherry picking when you entirely disregard that part of what I said, and several other similar statements? Maybe you just hadn't read everything I'd written. Fine. If you didn't read it all then that's the root of the problem here. But what you said was passive aggressive and rude, whether you meant it or not because it did, indeed, imply I was a terrible, callous pig who didn't see the trauma of rape as anything worse than having the blues, whether you explicitly called me that sort of thing or not. That's the passive part of passive aggressive. And so, by the way, is telling me to calm down. You're implying the problem's with me when you have clearly misrepresented what I have been discussing. If you misrepresented it accidentally own up to it. But you did misrepresent what I'm saying -- badly -- calling it oversimplified and treating me like I don't understand the trauma of rape. My views on this matter are hardly simple. Anyone should be able to easily recognize that reality. For the sake of fairness, I felt Just_a_Guy also misrepresented what I was saying in one instance too because of a similar misunderstanding (perhaps you saw the exchange over ibuprofen). When I called him on it we actually discussed the issue back and forth until we clarified what was being meant. So I'm certainly not singling you out. But he didn't tell me to calm down, tell me that he didn't appreciate it, or use other blatant passive aggressive phrasing when explaining himself. You may not be able to see that such things are passive aggressive Ad Hominem, but they are, nonetheless. Sure, we can't all be JaG with his suave and calm communication style. I'm passive aggressive all the time. I use Ad Hominem. I misspeak. I'm a mortal with mortal weaknesses. I accept that you didn't mean to be rude. Heck, I accidentally did the exact same thing to @estradling75 the other day. I didn't meant to say something rude to him, but he took it as rude. So I understand that this sort of thing can happen. What you suggested about my view, intentionally or not, is an offensive idea, but I'm not offended, and I certainly don't need to calm down. I am entirely calm. But when someone is using an offensive suggestion to push a point of argument that isn't actually related to what I'm trying to say (in other words, my sympathy or understanding of rape victims' trauma is irrelevant to the point being made), then I'm going to call them out on that. You're attacking a slightly misspoken phrase. I said, "feel bad". I should have said, "feel beyond tortured" or...I don't know for sure. Some word that encompasses the horror of rape better. Maybe it can't be encapsulated in a single word. In context, what I was saying should be pretty clear though. Should be. Unless someone didn't bother to read or even try to understand all I've written on it.