Jamie123

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Jamie123 last won the day on September 11

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About Jamie123

  • Birthday 10/03/1964

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    UK
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    Pretty much everything.
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    Christian

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  1. Interesting coincidence: David Starkey has just posted this video about the significance of the Arthurian story on British history. It's very long, but quite interesting - you may want to skip to about half way in when he starts talking about the Tudors
  2. Too right. After his mum stuck it for 70 years it would look pretty pathetic if he couldn't even manage 5 minutes.
  3. There very nearly was an Arthur II - the eldest son of Henry VII who sadly died before his father. Henry was a Welshman and a descendant of the British kings who ruled before the Angles, Saxons and Normans came along, so it's not hard to see why he chose the name.
  4. Yes indeed - what I have is medium length and I think quite respectful. Thanks.
  5. Since posting this the thoughts have come flooding and I think I'm ready. Thanks to anyone who prayed for me!
  6. Sorry I should have said "prayers" not "intercessions". You stand up at the front and say prayers for everyone. You decide yourself what yo say, but you typically follow an accepted form (beginning with "Dear Heavenly Father" and ending with "rejoicing in the fellowship of all your saints...etc..etc..amen. Traditionally it is done by the priest, but in these more progressive times it's someone from the congregation. Some people go on and on and on until in the end no one's listening. I keep mine short - usually because I put it off to the last minute to write it (tell the truth and shame the Devil!) - but short intercessions are generally preferred by the congregation. Anyway, this is the one week I definitely can't afford to be sloppy. Anyone got anything prayerworthy they want me to include?
  7. I thought on Thursday when *the news* came, I didn't envy whoever was down to lead intercessions in church this Sunday. Guess who it is... This is the one Sunday service everyone's going to remember for ever, so if I muck up intercessions that's my place in history assured. Wish me luck...
  8. It's hard to tell if the chandelier is in the foreground or hanging directly over the tub. In the latter case I wouldn't care to take a shower with the lights on!
  9. I believe Charles II was quite popular in his day because he lifted most of the puritanical policies of the Protectorate. The problem was that as a descendant of Scottish kings, he took the idea of divine rights a bit more seriously than did most Englishmen, and overruled objections to his Catholic brother succeeding him. From his perspective this was a disaster, but it precipitated a largely peaceful revolution which gave us the moderate form of monarchy we still have today.
  10. Just a small point - Queen Anne was the last woman to hold the title "Queen of England", and she died in 1714 (at which point she had not been Queen of England for 7 years). Elizabeth II was Queen of the United Kingdom (of Great Britain and Northern Ireland etc...etc.)
  11. You're right- she served as a mechanic and a driver.
  12. You're partly right, but it's also a method of evaluating definite integrals of functions with no analytical integral, or indeed any equation form at all. (Though Simpson's rule is usually more accurate since it is based on a parabolic rather than linear interpolation.)
  13. I'm not the right person to judge the medical quality of the paper, but it may be fine in that regard - particularly if researchers had been using cruder methods and could gain greater precision using trapezoids (though Simpson's rule would be better still). But you must admit it's comical that in the very first sentence of the abstract she names a method known for millennia after herself. No one unilaterally names their own discoveries anyway. (Well almost no one: the only other example I can think of is the "Hovind Theory" - named by Kent Hovind - that the ice age was caused by an "ice meteor" breaking apart in the earth's atmosphere and falling as "super-cold snow".) Most scientists have the humility to let others decide whether they deserve the accolade of an equation named after them.
  14. It's not going to happen. A few years ago they tried to abolish the Lord Chancellor, but the paperwork made it a dozen times more trouble than it was worth. To abolish the monarchy would be a hundred times worse. It would make Brexit look like a doddle!
  15. She just died We now have a king I'm in shock