The Folk Prophet

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The Folk Prophet last won the day on November 26 2020

The Folk Prophet had the most liked content!

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About The Folk Prophet

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    Not here...but watching...always watching

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    Male
  • Location
    Saratoga Springs, UT
  • Religion
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

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  1. The Folk Prophet

    Make the Forums Great Again

    As one who's essentially left the forum I can comment (as I happen to have joined back in for a day or two for a specific discussion). But since this thread is here during that time, (I won't be around long), I'll comment from my perspective. I think the reason I left the forum may be the issue at hand. When the division becomes as great as it has between two factions, those factions struggle for civility. I'll label those factions conservatism and progressivism, but those are relative terms. Still, it should be understood. And I don't mean politically. Politics only interest me as to how they relate to the eternal. These two factions, so divided, struggle to bond in any regard. And, really, in my opinion, they should not bond, because one of them is team Satan and the other is team God. But the result is conflict. So I find myself at an impasse. I have two desires -- two principles -- that are at odds one with another. 1. Civility and unity. 2. The need to stand strong and fight against what I see as the increasing growth of evil and its encroachment upon society. Keep in mind, the struggle I'm talking about on these two things is not with others. It is with myself. I wish to be civil and united. I also cannot engage with what I consider evil without taking a stand against it. I do not feel I can or should abandon either of these principles. And yet...how? And so I finally came to a point where the only option for me was to walk away. I can't fight the one fight without losing the other and vice versa. So I retreated instead. The plain truth is that the divide between good and evil is growing. And that, I believe, is the root of the problem. The growth of evil demands a violent, bloody fight! (I'm not suggesting literal, physical, fighting. I'm just being metaphorical here). It demands it! And yet...who wants to be in bloody, violent fights all the time? It's depressing, disheartening, discouraging, unpleasant, and just no fun. And yet, part of me feels like I've pulled a Jonah. But still.... Yes...I realize I'm worse than pretty much anyone else in my views in this regard. And therefore it is, frankly, surprising I engaged as long as I did. But it was, for the most part, no fun. And I came to the point where it broke me. And maybe that is a good thing. Maybe I've been wrong all along in my views on fighting the good fight. Or maybe I just suck at it.
  2. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    Hahahahahahahahahahaha. Um....no. Am I disciplined? In many ways, yes. But am I good at it? No. It's a constant fight. My natural state is, decidedly, undisciplined. Am I committed? Depends on what to. The gospel? Yes. Other stuff...well, I could give you a list of the projects started and abandoned through the years.
  3. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    I think for me, I would, by a thousand fold, rather hide behind religion in an effort to exercise faith than I would abandon faith in an effort to not hide behind religion. Really, my consternation over the article, can probably be summarized that simply.
  4. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    I'll grant it's semantics. But...we are, at our cores, spiritual beings. If, as the article implies of "spiritual bypassing", we want to speak of burying our heads in the sand, I think an approach that pretends there is a separation between the spiritual and who we are is king of said head-in-sand burying. The eternal perspective is the only legitimate perspective because it is the only one that recognized truth as it really is.
  5. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    Good catch. I think I had misread the part about being a "a therapist and Buddhist teacher", where she was referring to someone else and not herself. Maybe she is LDS. In which case my thumbs down increases by 20 thumbs.
  6. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    I'd go so far as to say that there is no remedy to emotional and psychological issues that isn't spiritual.
  7. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    Similar to my thoughts. The idea of avoiding things by sticking your head in the "positive" sand isn't a "spiritual" thing. One might as well say, "if you see someone smiling they may be putting on a façade and secretly miserable inside." Yes...this is definitely a potential. But when you turn that into, "smiling might be a evidence of 'happy bypassing'", then one is just being silly. Responding that way to things is a result of psychological and emotional immaturity. That is the cause and the problem that should be addressed. The blaming of the "spirituality" boogeyman is turning things upside down. (Now, to be fair, I don't think the article was that unfair or uneven. I'm just sharing some thoughts.) I think I agree. But I am concerned that the article sets it up so any time anyone suggests to another, for example, that they be positive in the face of difficulties, that such a suggestion must be engaging in something harmful. Moreover, the close relative is sharing the article, proselytizing it to others, to perhaps lead them into the same sort of "positive is negative" type think. Even more harmful...when said relative first shared the article with me they stated, "I have been long trying to study and compile and write about how codependency is taught culturally in our wards and stakes...." followed by having found the article that validates this. Of course, it's what's being taught at church that's the problem here, right? Essentially what I read into this (and I might be biased...but...) is that said relative is trying to convince others that if anyone suggests at church that we, as Jesus taught, turn the other cheek it's encouraging codependency. Yes...you are right...responding with that type of argument is unlikely to do anything but cause hurt feelings all around. But it sure bothers me. (In point of fact, the return to the forum for the day for me was to give me an outlet to express my frustration so I can get it out of my system without causing real harm with close loved ones.)
  8. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    The article is not written from and LDS perspective. And I do think that there is legitimacy to some of the ideas when it comes to the hippy-voodoo "spirituality" that may be common to a lot of people's ideas of "spirituality". Where I have the problem is when you take the world's ideas and try and apply them to the God's religion, and true spirituality. If someone was sharing this article to explain how their Buddhism and yoga were false fronts that were being used to hide from actually facing their problems...sure...I'm on board. When you start trying to apply the same to an actual relationship with the actual God and the actual true processes He has prescribed for us to use, etc., etc... it starts smacking of relying on the arm of flesh pretty quickly. In essence, a lot of the article (if applied by a Latter-day Saint to the Church of Jesus Christ), seems to argue that the Savior's teachings were wrong, the prophets spout useless and harmful platitudes, and we should not take scriptural council as valid or legitimate because... you know...psychology.
  9. The Folk Prophet

    Spiritual Bypassing

    A close relative of mine has been touting this article as wonderful and helpful and all that. I feel differently. I don't feel like expressing said differences directly to said close relative is a good idea. So I thought I'd post it here and see what you all think. Am I injecting some kind of bias, or is this article seriously flawed? https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-spiritual-bypassing-5081640
  10. The Folk Prophet

    Plandemic and 5G conspiracies and...

    Do share then.
  11. The Folk Prophet

    Plandemic and 5G conspiracies and...

    ...what in the world is going on?! The license to go crazy has gone mainstream. Seriously. One of my closest friends for the last 20 years sent me the Plandemic video and when I didn't buy off on its full legitimacy immediately he flipped out and cut off our relationship for good. Is this what we're becoming? I'm only trying to exert the smallest amount of moderation in my views. (Surprise, surprise, I can be moderate in some things.) But apparently any sort of moderation and hoping/waiting for facts is unacceptable any longer. The kind of things I'm seeing people post on social media and believing whole-hog without evidence is...well, it's truly shocking. I know there's evil in the world. I know there's evil in government. I know there's evil in big pharm. I know there's evil in capitalism. I know there's evil in socialism. I know there's evil pretty much everywhere. Does that mean I have to buy off on any youtube video that supports someone's particular narrative or I'm the bad guy? Sure...I'm concerned by these evils. I'm much more concerned by the evil that seems to be stewing and brewing in my friends, neighbors, and family. The hatred and bitterness I'm seeing from them on Facebook and the like. We're supposed to be followers of Christ. And we're supposed to be one in Him. We're not supposed to hate each other for not buying off on all the minutia of our particular extreme brand of political think. Anyhow, I'm not really joining again here, but I do read, and thought the discussion of some of these conspiracies and the like would be interesting. So go for it.
  12. The Folk Prophet

    Despite All We Can Do

    Honestly I just wanted to ask him what his motivations were and see if I could get an upfront answer. I expect I wouldn't have.
  13. The Folk Prophet

    Despite All We Can Do

    Well, I had sort of been hoping to get into it a bit with the OP, (who I actually respect intellectually and his understanding and education by and large, but feel he's missed the boat on a few ideas here). But as he seems to have abandoned the thread for now at least, and as I'm actually not interested in re-attending the forum generally, I'm taking off again. Perhaps I'll pipe up again if he comes back and replies more.
  14. The Folk Prophet

    Despite All We Can Do

    Right. Do we keep the commandments because we have accepted Christ or do we accept Christ by keeping his commandments? Aren't both sort of true? I honestly don't understand the new-fangled preaching about grace that keeps popping up. Shouldn't we be, moreso, focused on things that we have control of rather than something we don't? I am less concerned with whether Christ's grace is conditional or not as I am over what I need to do. I can only control my works. Therefore my concern is my works. "Ah," but one says, "it's important that we understand this concept!" "Oh yeah?" I ask. "How do I go about understanding it then?" "Why through study, thought and effort, of course," they reply. "Oh...you mean by my works?" "......🦗🦗🦗🦗......" These debates are somewhat semantically ridiculous because depending on how you look at it, one cannot get away from works. Just accept Christ's grace says one? Well, that's a work says I. Which makes the whole debate seem silly. There seems to be this, sort of, "you're doing it wrong" idea behind proposals like the OP offers. The question I ask myself (as I've stated) is simple: What do I need to be doing? It's as simple as that. And that means works. Am I motivated by and grateful for Christ's grace? Oh yes. Very much. And if there is a problem with people taking pride in their works and crediting their salvation to themselves (as I expect there is in cases) then there does, in those cases, need to be some better perspective, humility, and improved understanding. But that doesn't seem to be the point of the OP or the attached interview.
  15. The Folk Prophet

    Despite All We Can Do

    Exactly. We are, indeed, saved by grace despite all we can do. We are also saved by grace, very literally, postliminarily "after" all we can do. This is why I don't, per se, have a problem with the idea of understanding it to be "despite" except in that it seems to be trying to supplant the common understanding. It's the conclusions being drawn that bothers me. Part of what bothers me about it is the assumption that everyone who thinks we are saved by grace in the end "after" all our own efforts also believes that we earned that salvation. It's trying to fix a problem that does not exist that I'm aware of in the church. Two more things that are not mutually exclusive. Just because I believe I have to pay the price asked does not mean I believe the price is equal to the reward.