seashmore

Is there power in the Personal Progress program?

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Does anyone have any examples of how receiving recognition for completing Personal Progress helped them? As a leader, I'm really struggling to see the value in checking off the boxes and handing out the ribbons. I'm totally on board with doing the experiences and the value projects, since I see the value in those. I just don't see the benefit of YW in Excelllence Nights, etc.

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I know nothing about the YW in Excellence Nights, but, the one benefit I can see to reporting on your progress is that a lot of people wouldn't make / complete goals without some sort of reporting.  I also know that some people like (are motivated by?) big to-dos, celebrations, public recognitions, congratulations, etc.  And some people seem never to have considered the notion that there are people who strongly dislike such things.

Edited by zil

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On 11/19/2017 at 2:33 PM, seashmore said:

Does anyone have any examples of how receiving recognition for completing Personal Progress helped them? As a leader, I'm really struggling to see the value in checking off the boxes and handing out the ribbons. I'm totally on board with doing the experiences and the value projects, since I see the value in those. I just don't see the benefit of YW in Excelllence Nights, etc.

I'd only echo what @zil said.  My daughter always gets more done when there is a list of stuff to do.  Without a list, she finds she can't focus as well.

She's shy in front of people.  But it always makes her feel good when people around her praise and congratulate her.

Finally, it is human nature.  We can try to deny the need for checking boxes of accomplishments.  But such things are part of every culture around the world and in every epoch in civilized history.  There is a reason for that.  We as human beings need such things.  When meaningful guidelines are given, worthwhile goals are set, work is demonstrated by physical evidence, and memories are made, a person's heart is warmed, and their spirit fulfilled.

Today's culture is wildly misleading:  Deny the need for checkboxes, but then they offer participation trophies as if they mean something.  No, the trophy or checkbox that doesn't mean anything is useless.  But when those boxes represent a meaningful activity, they can become very rewarding.

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I have a confession to make.

I never did get any of those awards!  None of them.  

Not even the one you are supposed to get to graduate primary.

Can you tell by the quality of my posts? :D

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Boys have merit badges, Girls have personal progress.  I just wish that court of honors in my ward was half as awesome as the Young Women's.  They go all out with the decor and the desserts and the speeches and posters.  The boys, on the other hand, go up to the hastily set up table with not even a table cloth to adorn it, get their badge, get a slap on the back for a job well done and that's about it.  They even roll their eyes when I tell them to stop for a second so I can take a picture...

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On 11/27/2017 at 8:13 PM, anatess2 said:

Boys have merit badges, Girls have personal progress.  I just wish that court of honors in my ward was half as awesome as the Young Women's.  They go all out with the decor and the desserts and the speeches and posters.  The boys, on the other hand, go up to the hastily set up table with not even a table cloth to adorn it, get their badge, get a slap on the back for a job well done and that's about it.  They even roll their eyes when I tell them to stop for a second so I can take a picture...

Reading this I'm remembering when I was one of two "patrol leaders" in our Boy Scout troop. Our two patrols were told to compete at a banquet by decorating the tables where our respective parents would be sitting. We got pretty enthusiastic (and competitive) about the assignment, and looking back gives me a feeling of pride that we really got in to it and made it a success. It's a small thing--not unlike checking off boxes for various objectives achieved, etc. Just another brick in the structure of stature, I think. Nice memories. :)

 

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