Connie

Members
  • Content Count

    1938
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Thanks
    Connie got a reaction from Vort in Creeping mediocrity masquerading as virtue   
    Thanks, Vort! I needed that!
  2. Like
    Connie reacted to MrShorty in Creeping mediocrity masquerading as virtue   
    I think King Benjamin touches on this. In Mosiah 4, vs 27, we often read, "And see that all these things are done in wisdom and order, for it is not requisite that a man should run faster than he has strength." and stop there. We then rationalize ourselves that we don't need to try as hard as we think. If we continue, though, "And again, it is expedient that he should be diligent, that thereby he might win the prize." we see that, while it's true we don't need over exert ourselves, we should be diligent.
  3. Love
    Connie reacted to Vort in Creeping mediocrity masquerading as virtue   
    I expect that all list members, especially those who are Latter-day Saints, felt a bit miffed when reading @Ironhold's thread. "What is the matter with people?" many of us thought. Why would anyone, much less a father, exhibit such a seemingly anal retentive attitude so as to require someone to kneel on BOTH knees, not just one, when performing an ordinance? I mean, seriously? It requires, like, zero insight to figure out that's not good.
    However, I am not without sympathy for Ironhold's dad. He was wrong, to be sure. @NeuroTypical's Joseph Fielding Smith "mic-drop" comment about the sacrament really nails this fact. I can't come up with any reasonable scenario where acting as Ironhold said that his father acted could be construed as acceptable, and I can't imagine that Ironhold would prevaricate or exaggerate such a matter. But I have long noticed a "creeping mediocrity" within the Church, often overlooked or dismissed, or worse yet, justified as somehow a charitable virtue. Maybe this was Ironhold's father's concern, too.
    Kneeling for prayer is a worthwhile example to examine. It's not a natural position, certainly not one that we can comfortably hold for any extended period without first being inured to it. It's like sitting in the Japanese floor-sitting position called seiza. If you're not Japanese and haven't practiced sitting like that since childhood, odds are you'll find it uncomfortable if not downright painful. The older you get, the harder it is. Yet Japanese, both young and old, sit in seiza for minutes or even hours at a time with minimal discomfort. Similarly, kneeling becomes a comfortable position only as we practice doing it a lot, for minutes or even hours at a time over a period of many years.
    So why would anyone kneel to pray? Well, perhaps in a way because it's not natural. Kneeling is a long-accepted demonstration of humility, a way of bowing before a greater authority, literally humbling ["humble" = low to the ground] oneself before another. This attitude is absolutely vital in praying to God. We do not approach God as an equal with whom we're carrying on a peer-to-peer conversation. Or if we do, then our prayers will not lead anywhere good, because we don't understand our position before God. We must approach God with an attitude of utter and abject humility, or else we don't approach God at all. Thus, kneeling is spiritually a completely natural and desirable act, the flesh mirroring the spirit in attitude.
    Then what of those who cannot kneel? They must therefore be cut off from all contact with God. It only follows, right? And the better one can kneel, the more acceptable he is before God!
    This is transparent nonsense. No one believes that. It's a Pharisaical attitude that probably would out-Pharisee the actual Pharisees.
    BUT...
    That's not to say the principle is untrue. Dwelling on the openly hypocritical nature of the above example tends to lead people to decide that any prescription of action such as kneeling is a hypocrisy. And thus we follow the garden path right down the slippery slope, until anything is acceptable and nothing has a real standard. Baptism by sprinkling? Infant baptism? Sure, why not? For that matter, why worry about baptism at all? It's all good!
    We kneel because it is our place to kneel before God. We kneel in such ordinances as the sacrament because we're instructed to do so. We kneel in our personal prayers because it serves as a physical reminder of our correct place before God. And the more we practice kneeling, the less onerous it becomes. If we can't kneel, then we don't kneel. But which of us has never found ourselves praying while lying down, just to get it over with, without even bothering to drag ourselves to our knees because we're just too tired (i.e. it's just too inconvenient)? I try always to kneel when I pray alone or with my wife, even when she prefers to sit. I kneel because I want to show God through my physical actions that I'm trying to humble my spirit. If my wife doesn't see things that way, that's okay. She doesn't report to me in such things. But that's what I feel, and it's what I have tried to teach my children.
    Another example I can bring up is the monthly fast. (Yes, this is an issue I have addressed multiple times in the past. If you're interested, here's my most recent post on the matter from about sixteen months ago.) Now I am in no position to judge individuals in this matter, so I make no such pretense. But I have eyes in my head and a brain in my skull. I have observed myself very closely over the years. I have observed family members, friends, fellow ward members, and congregations I have visited. I have observed in-laws, both my own and those of my children and relatives. And what I have noticed is that Church members very often make up excuses for why they cannot or will not fast. It's often the idea that they have low blood sugar or diabetic intolerance or that fasting makes them feel bad, so instead they'll give up something else like watching TV for Sunday, and THAT will count exactly the same as a fast. Because that's what a fast is, really. Sacrificing something. Right?
    No. Not right.
    From what I can see, people don't fast because they don't like it. Going without food and drink, even for a short 24-hour period, makes them feel weak and achy and uncomfortable. But as I have often quoted President Woodruff as having said:
    It was remarked this morning that some people said they could not fast because it made their head ache. Well, I can fast, and so can any other man; and if it makes my head ache by keeping the commandments of God, let it ache.
    How many blessings do we completely miss out on because we Just Won't Fast? I don't think it's right to berate ward or family members for not fasting. That is not my place, and it is not what I'm trying to do. But it doesn't take a genius or a prophet to look at what's going on and realize that, as a people, we appear not to keep the monthly fast as we should. Is this not another example of creeping mediocrity that ends up being oh-so-ironically justified as some kind of virtue?
    We have to walk a line. On the one side is Pharisaical insistence on rules and adherence to all sorts of measures that somehow show physical proof of our spiritual righteousness. Such hypocrisy is abominable to God; it seems to me that the only people toward whom the mortal Jesus ever seemed to show anything approaching disgust or revulsion were those who displayed just that sort of hypocrisy. But on the other side is the universalist tendency to say, "Eat, drink, and be merry, for tomorrow we die...and if it so be that we are guilty, God will beat us with a few stripes, and at last we shall be saved in the kingdom of God." This sort of pooh-poohing of the commandments and teachings cannot be any less damnable than the previously mentioned hypocrisy.
    The very first and most important gift that we as Saints are given is the gift of the Holy Ghost. Through that gift, we can—indeed, we must—learn to distinguish right from wrong and truth from error. If we depend on the Spirit, I don't think we'll have too much trouble finding the balance between the two extremes portrayed above. When we get off-track to the one side or the other, the Spirit will correct us. Until we've developed that spiritual maturity, it behooves us greatly to pay attention, follow the teachings, and be very strictly honest with ourselves about our efforts and motivations.
    In any case, let's be slow to embrace mediocrity, and never try to justify it as some sort of holy thing. In this, I'm speaking to myself at least as much as to anyone else.
  4. Like
    Connie got a reaction from NeuroTypical in How is everybody doing?   
    The library is my home away from home, so I'm missing that. Grocery shopping has gotten weird. It's strange to see all the parks empty.
    I'm missing being able to attend the temple. I'm realizing how much I took that for granted, and now I'm really feeling it. But I'm loving having church at home with just our little family so much that I haven't missed our ward meetings. Is that bad? I'm not sure.
  5. Like
    Connie got a reaction from NeuroTypical in How is everybody doing?   
    The library is my home away from home, so I'm missing that. Grocery shopping has gotten weird. It's strange to see all the parks empty.
    I'm missing being able to attend the temple. I'm realizing how much I took that for granted, and now I'm really feeling it. But I'm loving having church at home with just our little family so much that I haven't missed our ward meetings. Is that bad? I'm not sure.
  6. Like
    Connie got a reaction from NeuroTypical in How is everybody doing?   
    The library is my home away from home, so I'm missing that. Grocery shopping has gotten weird. It's strange to see all the parks empty.
    I'm missing being able to attend the temple. I'm realizing how much I took that for granted, and now I'm really feeling it. But I'm loving having church at home with just our little family so much that I haven't missed our ward meetings. Is that bad? I'm not sure.
  7. Like
    Connie got a reaction from NeuroTypical in How is everybody doing?   
    The library is my home away from home, so I'm missing that. Grocery shopping has gotten weird. It's strange to see all the parks empty.
    I'm missing being able to attend the temple. I'm realizing how much I took that for granted, and now I'm really feeling it. But I'm loving having church at home with just our little family so much that I haven't missed our ward meetings. Is that bad? I'm not sure.
  8. Like
    Connie got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    My thinking has been, God’s will is going to be done regardless. And what I want, even if I think it is right and good, is not always what he wants. In fact, I’m learning it very rarely is. His ways are higher than my ways and all that. This is why I struggle with asking. Any insights are appreciated.
  9. Love
    Connie got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    I identify so much with this. I, too, struggle with prayer. I feel your hurt because I've felt it myself. You are definitely not alone in this. Just wanted to let you know that. I wish I knew the answer.
  10. Love
    Connie got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    I identify so much with this. I, too, struggle with prayer. I feel your hurt because I've felt it myself. You are definitely not alone in this. Just wanted to let you know that. I wish I knew the answer.
  11. Love
    Connie got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    I identify so much with this. I, too, struggle with prayer. I feel your hurt because I've felt it myself. You are definitely not alone in this. Just wanted to let you know that. I wish I knew the answer.
  12. Love
    Connie got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    I identify so much with this. I, too, struggle with prayer. I feel your hurt because I've felt it myself. You are definitely not alone in this. Just wanted to let you know that. I wish I knew the answer.
  13. Like
    Connie reacted to Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    I'm not angry, more just sad, wanting to hide, and not ask anymore.  Even something like Pres. Nelson's call for a worldwide fast this weekend... I feel like I can't ask. 
  14. Like
    Connie reacted to Jane_Doe in Prayer: when you don't want to ask   
    (please be gentle here)
     
    Prayer & I have a complicated relationship.  Or to be more specific, the "asking for things" part of prayer & I have a complicated relationship.
    I don't like to ask people for things-- such is a huge move of trust for me, and I feel like I've been burned too much in the past.  I'm much more comfortable doing something myself, or making do without.  I don't want to trouble others, I don't want to ask and be disappointed in them.  I feel like I give and give- which I do because I enjoy so much, but too often people don't give back.  From the evidence, they  appear to be different than me.   Some aren't, but a lot of people are different in this regard.
    Asking God for things...yes, I know that God is the ultimate giver, and has already given way more than I could.  I got that.  But I also feel.. like I shouldn't ask Him for things.  Which as a parent breaks my heart- I WANT my kids to ask me for things.  I know the Father does too.  But when I do work up the courage to ask- something super important to me and by all indicators is a righteous request... a lot of time there is not receiving.  And I hurt.  I hurt a lot.  And I want to hide.  I don't want to ask again.  I really don't.
    Yes, "thy will be done".  Yes, God is not a vending machine.  Yes, God is equally with those that receive miraculous healing and those whom He more directly welcomes their spirits into His arms.   Yes, God is equally with those whom keep their jobs, and those who are forced to leave.  Yes, I know that I am blessed in some many areas.  Yes, I have a GOOD life that I am so grateful for.   Yes, things could be much worse.  Yes, yes, I know all of those things- I recite them to myself regularly.  And sometimes they help.  Most times they help. 
    But other times... I hurt....
  15. Haha
    Connie reacted to Vort in What's the last book you read?   
    Didn't realize it was a horror novel.
  16. Like
    Connie got a reaction from mordorbund in What's the last book you read?   
    I am really loving Volume 2 of Saints. There are so many details about this time period I didn't know. Like the infamous beginnings of the Salt Lake Tribune. 🤣
  17. Like
    Connie got a reaction from MormonGator in Ward Boundary Changes   
    Considering that the constellations, themselves, are completely arbitrary. That's smart. 👍
    https://youtu.be/j0H4xTla_M8
  18. Like
    Connie got a reaction from MormonGator in Ward Boundary Changes   
    Considering that the constellations, themselves, are completely arbitrary. That's smart. 👍
    https://youtu.be/j0H4xTla_M8
  19. Like
    Connie got a reaction from dprh in I feel very bad about feeling upset over a baby   
    I know exactly how you feel. Been there, done that (though without the CF component). It’s okay to feel what you’re feeling. It will pass.
    Some things that helped me was letting people in my life know that I was pregnant. They are great people, and their reactions were perfect and helped me remember the joy of it. Also, the Savior knows how you feel and can help you bear the burden. Rely on Him. And remember that these things will give you experience and be for your good.
  20. Like
    Connie got a reaction from dprh in I feel very bad about feeling upset over a baby   
    I know exactly how you feel. Been there, done that (though without the CF component). It’s okay to feel what you’re feeling. It will pass.
    Some things that helped me was letting people in my life know that I was pregnant. They are great people, and their reactions were perfect and helped me remember the joy of it. Also, the Savior knows how you feel and can help you bear the burden. Rely on Him. And remember that these things will give you experience and be for your good.
  21. Like
    Connie reacted to Vort in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    That's actually quite beautiful. Thank you.
  22. Thanks
    Connie got a reaction from Vort in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    I know. And i was dead serious... as always... 😜
     

  23. Thanks
    Connie got a reaction from Vort in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    I know. And i was dead serious... as always... 😜
     

  24. Haha
    Connie got a reaction from Vort in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    Oh, fine. I guess it's a bit too text heavy for a meme. 😄 But my inner girly girl wants to take it and put some sort of decorative border around it. My practical side just wants to post it on facebook.
  25. Thanks
    Connie got a reaction from Vort in When does compassion become enabling to sin?   
    I love this so much! It should be a meme.