mordorbund

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  1. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from prisonchaplain in If prisonchaplain were an LDS bishop he'd tell youth not to date non-LDS   
    From my understanding of Evangelical theology, I would say don't date LDS!!! (I may need more exclamation marks)
     
    We are talking about your salvation, your children's salvation, and your spouse's salvation. When you are married, you are to be one (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/eph/5.28-29,31?lang=eng#27) (even one flesh), to the extent that your joys and your trials are shared. If your spouse becomes a stumbling block for you, the two of you need to work together to move forward. Jesus taught that if your eye offends you, pluck it out (and dealing with one flesh, how difficult is it if that eye has an arm fighting to keep it in). Paul softened this by suggesting that the believing spouse may in time sanctify the unbelieving (but I would point out that the sanctifying happens when the two of you together excise offending eyes). I say exercise discernment and marry a partner who is a true partner! You'll be rearing children together, "Can two walk together, except they be aagreed?" You will both influence your children in the way of salvation. Choose someone who will show them the path.
     
    My simple test on this matter: Date persons that you think are saved.
     
    For the most part, that excludes LDS, and that's fine by me. If our youth are in error, don't risk yourself and your posterity.
  2. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from prisonchaplain in If prisonchaplain were an LDS bishop he'd tell youth not to date non-LDS   
    From my understanding of Evangelical theology, I would say don't date LDS!!! (I may need more exclamation marks)
     
    We are talking about your salvation, your children's salvation, and your spouse's salvation. When you are married, you are to be one (https://www.lds.org/scriptures/nt/eph/5.28-29,31?lang=eng#27) (even one flesh), to the extent that your joys and your trials are shared. If your spouse becomes a stumbling block for you, the two of you need to work together to move forward. Jesus taught that if your eye offends you, pluck it out (and dealing with one flesh, how difficult is it if that eye has an arm fighting to keep it in). Paul softened this by suggesting that the believing spouse may in time sanctify the unbelieving (but I would point out that the sanctifying happens when the two of you together excise offending eyes). I say exercise discernment and marry a partner who is a true partner! You'll be rearing children together, "Can two walk together, except they be aagreed?" You will both influence your children in the way of salvation. Choose someone who will show them the path.
     
    My simple test on this matter: Date persons that you think are saved.
     
    For the most part, that excludes LDS, and that's fine by me. If our youth are in error, don't risk yourself and your posterity.
  3. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Wingnut in This new forum....   
    Wahooo!!!  The "View New Content" button is working in the Full Version now.  Thank you Pam, and the behind-the-scenes site admins!
  4. Like
    mordorbund reacted to prisonchaplain in The Evangelical WOW   
    "I don't drink, smoke, gamble or chew--and I don't go with girls that do."
     
    "Garbage in.  Garbage out."  Be careful what you feed your mind on--why allow the Devil to vomit in your household?  Use the off button, brother!
     
    Maybe one of our greatest "urban legends" was backmasking.  The idea was that certain Rock 'n Roll groups had intentionally placed demonic or immoral messages within their songs--backwards.  Supposedly the concious mind could not filter out the gibberish, but the subconcious mind would be forced to feed on the immoral suggestions unfiltered.  Bottom-line:  Stick to Christian music!
     
    No to bingo, lotteries, and gambling.  Back in the day, even card playing was discouraged--it looked too much like gambling.
     
    Harken back a couple generations and dancing was a major taboo.  One comedian even quipped, "Repent and be Baptist, for all have fallen short of the Assemblies of God."  (It was tongue-in-cheek, because we forbade dancing and many Baptists were okay with it).
     
    Of course makeup was taboo back in the 50s and 60s, until 'progressive pastors' broke down the taboo by saying, "Some old barns need a coat of paint."
     
    Was there some legalism and silliness in all this?  Some.  On the other hand, many nonreligious folk have taken to abstinence from alcohol, and the current political administration is more adamant against tobacco than we are.  Many civic leaders see casinos as causing more social harm than economic good.
     
    Bottom line:  A lot of the words of wisdom are wise indeed. 
  5. Like
    mordorbund reacted to prisonchaplain in Who's my neighbor?   
    Maybe the neighbor is the one who we believe will never be baptized?
  6. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from The Folk Prophet in Are garments required after death?   
    I read "not encouraged" as a more relaxed stance than "discouraged". From the Church Handbook of Instruction vol 2, 21.3.2:
     
  7. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Wingnut in This new forum....   
    Well there's your problem.
  8. Like
    mordorbund reacted to jerome1232 in This new forum....   
    I still miss the old artwork.
     
    You need a bash script to unhorriblify things.
    if (horrible)
     make unhorrible
    fi
  9. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Wingnut in This new forum....   
    Could you be a bit more specific on what makes this a "horrible format"? I keep running my unhorriblify.bat script and it's apparently not doing what you want.
  10. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Wingnut in This new forum....   
    Could you be a bit more specific on what makes this a "horrible format"? I keep running my unhorriblify.bat script and it's apparently not doing what you want.
  11. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Wingnut in This new forum....   
    Could you be a bit more specific on what makes this a "horrible format"? I keep running my unhorriblify.bat script and it's apparently not doing what you want.
  12. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from The Folk Prophet in Are garments required after death?   
    I read "not encouraged" as a more relaxed stance than "discouraged". From the Church Handbook of Instruction vol 2, 21.3.2:
     
  13. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Just_A_Guy in National debt - what comes next?   
    And then when everyone is Super.... no one will be ...
  14. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Just_A_Guy in The Rise of the Same-Sex Marriage Dissidents   
    But as you well know, states don't have the right to deny a freedom guaranteed by the bill of rights--in this case, Huguenin's right to practice her religion by abstaining from an activity she found abhorrent.  SCOTUS' refusal to grant certiorari here is troubling.  I can only hope that they denied cert because, had they granted it, this case would have made it to them before the Utah same-sex marriage case that's currently before the 10th Circuit; and that they're hoping to pin down the constitutional role of same-sex marriage before they determine the relationship between whatever "rights" get established in that case versus the freedom of religion.  Thankfully, mere denial of cert doesn't set national precedent; so New Mexico's harebrained activities only subjugates New Mexico at the present time.
     
    I've seen a couple of interesting hypotheticals recently in online discussions regarding whether the New Mexico precedent requires a black photographer, if asked, to do a promotional shoot for a KKK rally; or a gay photographer to produce a series of sympathetic shots for a Westboro Baptist Church activity.  Because the KKK could easily claim racial discrimination; and WBC could claim religious discrimination, against photographers who refused to cover these kinds of events.
     
     
    I agree with you; but since we're going all free-market here we should probably ask why it's OK for a consumer to boycott a producer for offensive activities, but not OK for an employer to "boycott" an employee for those exact same activities.  Why should the loss of one's livelihood due to socially unacceptable speech be a natural result of repugnant behavior in the one case; but unlawful discrimination that should be remedied at law in the other case? 
     
    And since a consumer can boycott a producer on "moral" grounds, why can't a producer (like Huguenin) be equally free to boycott a consumer on "moral" grounds?
  15. Like
    mordorbund reacted to estradling75 in Please help us get to the temple!   
    It can be premature to bring in the Stake President if you have not sat down with the Bishop and said "we don't understand why our four months of tithing are only being considered one payment simply because we forgot to bring the envelopes to church with us." and listend to what he said and the instructions and teaching he is trying to get accross.  Asking such a question of the bishop is exactly the kind of thing a person should do when they don't understand, before going to the Stake President
     
    Once you have that answer then you are in a better position to determine if a visit to the Stake President might be helpful.
  16. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Traveler in Life in the Celestial Kingdom   
  17. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Traveler in Life in the Celestial Kingdom   
    I think what Traveler is getting at is illustrated by the sorcerer's wish in Disney's Aladdin. He saw the "phenomenal cosmic power" and craved it. He wished it and got that AND "itty-bitty living space". I don't think anyone would say that the whole package was his desire.
     
    Or as another example, how many people do you know that want to be millionaires? No, I mean really want to be a millionaire for the rest of their lives? Just to clarify, I'm talking about people who want to buy used cars, learn to fix things themselves, do without the latest gadgets (or even any version of the gadget, as the case may be). If they want a high-paying job to pay for it, do they want the whole package? Do they want their profession to always be "on", so that when they're not "on the clock", they're learning more about their trade and gaining the skills that keep them in the competitive minority?
     
    Or how many people want to be as skinny as that actress on tv eating a pizza and downing a soda? Would they still want to be as skinny as that actress if they saw she maintains that weight by really eating lower-calorie meals, exercise, and NOT by eating pizza and soda.
     
    So, bringing it back to Traveler's example, how many people really want to be citizens in the Celestial Kingdom if they find out that the glory is really service? Or that the price of admittance is discipline? Or that our final rest is actually really hard work? Or that a lot of our endeavors involve exactly that gospel principle that I find so frustrating!?
     
    I think Traveler has a valid point that in order to really desire it, you have to recognize the whole package and desire the whole thing.
  18. Like
    mordorbund reacted to estradling75 in Please help us get to the temple!   
    Your bishop has the authority to enforce the standards of worthiness to enter the temple.
     
    Asking you to pay tithing consistently for six months seems to be well with in the bishop's calling on this matter.
     
    If you and your spouse wish to get to the temple I would encourage you to follow your bishop's council
  19. Like
    mordorbund reacted to Wingnut in Power of Everyday Missionaries - thoughts?   
    I very much disagree with this.  I am Mormon.  I am very much Mormon.  But I choose not to deliberately pepper my conversations with references to LDS-specific language, particularly in casual or professional conversation.  If I'm talking with non-member neighbors or friends with whom I have an established relationship and have talked about church things before, I'm less likely to censor myself because the relationship is already safe, and it's already established as a non-taboo topic.  I'm not afraid to be a Mormon, and it's offensive that you would suggest that I am.  I choose to use language that is comfortable and relatable to the people I'm speaking with.  I try to meet them where they are.  Instead of "ward" (mental ward?), I use "congregation."  Instead of "young women" or "young men," I use "youth group."  It allows conversations to happen naturally without having to detour for explanations in the moment.  But it still lets people know that I'm involved with my church, and obviously it's something important to me.  It may not open doors immediately, but it lets people know they can knock whenever they want to.  In the meantime, I continue to build relationships of trust and understanding.
     
    Note: I'm not saying that "everyday missionaries" don't build relationships, or that they are doing it wrong.  I'm agreeing with Dravin as to the propriety and context of such language and conversation.  For me, constant "foreign" language (and subsequent over-eager explanation) would be a huge turn-off in a casual relationship conversation, or a professional setting.
  20. Like
    mordorbund reacted to jerome1232 in This new forum....   
    With old forums theme, I knew I was in mormon land. With the new "full version" theme, it's very nice, consistent with the rest of the site, and at least has a lds.net header at the top. Heck for me it really just lacks one feature, showing me all new threads I haven't viewed. This ip.boards theme, while it's got all the buttons one would need for their daily foruming, it just looks like the generic theme, it has no custom lds.net logo's anywhere, no artwork, etc....
     
  21. Like
    mordorbund reacted to NeuroTypical in Can you find the driver of a partial plate?   
    Yep, that's me.  I figured the old name was limiting my artistic range. 
  22. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Wingnut in Can you find the driver of a partial plate?   
    Are you the poster-formerly-known-as-LoudmouthMormon?
     
    The actors have changed their masks in the middle of the play!
  23. Like
    mordorbund reacted to prisonchaplain in Christian Faith   
    The Folk Prophet may have stumbled upon an aspect of what happens after conversion that even Evangelicals disagree about:  the possibility of "falling from grace."  If the grace we receive is 100% Christ-dependent than can we lose it, neglect it, or otherwise let go of the salvation it brings?  Some--myself included--say that yes, it is possible.  We can give it up.  We can neglect it to the point of losing it.  We can reject it in favor of sin.  We can even renounce our grace and our salvation.  Our position begins to look similar to the LDS view, then.  The one aspect I would strain at is that Evangelicals argue that the one who obeys the Lord in baptism is doing so as one who is already saved.  The Christian who "endures to the end," was saved the entire time.  He doesn't gain assurance of his salvation at the end.  He's had it all along the way.  The good works are signals of a salvation already gained, not some kind of installment payments that assure that I get the salvation when the mortgage is paid off.
     
    I just caught the last post The Folk Prophet published, and want to add that he captures the dilemma quite well.  LDS strive to please God even as they are repenting.  We Evangelicals (and Protestants in general) believe there is no pleasing God until we first repent.  We come empty-handed.  We don't dare try to bring anything that would appear to lessen the reality of our sin.  The agency is in choosing to repent.  Once converted, what will we do for God.  30-fold?  60-fold?  100-fold?  That too is agency.  Those of us who do believe salvation can be lost would add that, whether through renunciation or neglect, the giving up of salvation is also agency.  Without love, and without the direction, approval and yes empowerment of the Holy Spirit, our good works, even after conversion, won't amount to much.  The greatest work is sincerely walking with God--doing his thing in his way and in his time.
  24. Like
    mordorbund reacted to prisonchaplain in Christian Faith   
    BTW...the chicken was first. 
     
     
  25. Like
    mordorbund got a reaction from Wingnut in Can you find the driver of a partial plate?   
    Are you the poster-formerly-known-as-LoudmouthMormon?
     
    The actors have changed their masks in the middle of the play!