askandanswer

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  1. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Average Joe in Talking to spirits?   
    When in doubt turn to the scriptures, like Leviticus 19:31
     
    New American Standard Bible 
    'Do not turn to mediums or spiritists; do not seek them out to be defiled by them. I am the LORD your God.

    King James Bible
    Regard not them that have familiar spirits, neither seek after wizards, to be defiled by them: I am the LORD your God.
     
    ​And remember, God is not the author of confusion, Satan is.
  2. Like
    askandanswer reacted to AngelMarvel in I am SO out of ideas for Father's Day   
    It's a little late to do this...but, may be useful for other gift giving days.
     
    When my husband and I are walking through ANY store, I watch those things that he looks at. But, you have to watch if he looks and leave it Or does he look and pick it up only for a second... or does he keep looking and picking it up and go back to it.
     
    For the past month I watched my husband and every time we went anywhere that had BBQ grills, he went and looked at them. He stayed looking for a long time, opening, closing, and checking them out telling me how nice they are.
     
    So... for Father's Day I bought him a 6 Grill BBQ grill. It's the one he looked at each time even though there were at least 10 other grills there. I knew that one was the one he would want.
     
    I do the same thing with my grand children for birthday's and Christmas. Take them shopping and just watch. If they pick up a toy and put it down right away... I know they will lose interest pretty quickly, so I don't buy that toy. I buy the toy that holds their interest for a good period of time.
     
    Hope that make sense.
  3. Like
    askandanswer reacted to skippy740 in where does it say "the prophet cannot lead us astray"???   
    D&C 1:24-28
    No one ever said that a prophet will always be perfect in all ways and in all things.
    I have personally come to understand that the phrase "a Prophet will never lead the Church astray" means that the Prophet will never lead or teach the members of the Church to sin and to not follow Christ.
    Yes, there have been many errors that have been repudiated. But that doesn't mean that the past Presidents of the Church were intentionally misleading members through "false doctrines".
    Consider these statements of past leaders of the church. (It appears that I may have found your quote.)
    “I make no claim of infallibility.”
    Spencer W. Kimball, Improvement Era, June 1970, p. 93
    “We make no claim of infallibility or perfection in the prophets, seers, and revelators.”
    James E. Faust, Ensign, November 1989, p. 11
    “The First Presidency cannot claim, individually or collectively, infallibility.”
    George Q. Cannon Gospel Truth: Discourses and Writings of President George Q. Cannon, 1957, 1:206
    “We respect and venerate” (the prophet), but “we do not believe that his personal views or utterances are revelations from God.”
    Elder Charles W. Penrose, Millennial Star, 54:191
    “Even the President of the Church has not always spoken under the direction of the Holy Ghost.”
    Elder J. Reuben Clark, quoted in Faithful History: Essays on Writing Mormon History, p. 82
    “…if He (God) should suffer him (Joseph Smith) to lead the people astray, it would be because they ought to be led astray…it would be because they deserved it…”
    Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 4:297-298
    “The First Presidency have of right a great influence over this people; and if we should get out of the way and lead this people to destruction, what a pity it would be! How can you know whether we lead you correctly, or not? Can you know by any other power than that of the Holy Ghost? I have uniformly exhorted the people to obtain this living witness each for themselves; then no man on earth can lead them astray.”
    Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 6:100
    “I am more afraid that this people have so much confidence in their leaders that they will not inquire for themselves of God whether they are led by him. I am fearful they settle down in a state of blind self-security, trusting their eternal destiny in the hands of their leaders with a reckless confidence that in itself would thwart the purposes of God in their salvation…Let every man and woman know, by the whispering of the Spirit of God to themselves, whether their leaders are walking in the path the Lord dictates, or not.”
    Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 14:205
    “Individual members are encouraged to independently strive to receive their own spiritual confirmation of the truthfulness of Church doctrine. Moreover, the Church exhorts all people to approach the gospel not only intellectually but with the intellect and the spirit, a process in which reason and faith work together.”
    Official Church web site The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

    “The Lord uses imperfect people…He often allows their errors to stand uncorrected. He may have a purpose in doing so, such as to teach us that religious truth comes forth “line upon line, precept upon precept” in a process of sifting and winnowing similar to the one I know so well in science.”
    Henry Eyring, Reflections of a Scientist, p. 47
    “There are exceptions to some rules. For example, we believe the commandment is not violated by killing pursuant to a lawful order in an armed conflict. But don’t ask me to give an opinion on your exception. I only teach general rules. Whether an exception applies to you is your responsibility. You must work that out individually between you and the Lord.”
    Elder Dallin H. Oaks, Ensign, June 2006, p. 16
    “I teach the people correct principles, and they govern themselves.”
    Joseph Smith, Journal of Discourses, 10: 57-58
    “We are all liable to error; are subject, more or less, to the errors incident to the human family. We would be pleased to get along without these errors, and many may think that a man in my standing ought to be perfect; no such thing.”
    Brigham Young, Journal of Discourses, 10:212
    “Sometimes traditions, customs, social practices, and personal preferences of individual Church members may, through repeated or common usage be misconstrued as Church procedures or policies. Occasionally, such traditions, customs and practices may even be regarded by some as eternal principles.”
    Elder Ronald Poelman, 1984 General Conference
    “Forget everything I have said, or what…Brigham Young…or whomsoever has said… that is contrary to the present revelation. We spoke with a limited understanding and without the light and knowledge that now has come into the world.”
    Elder Bruce R. McConkie, CES Conference, August 1978
    “We set up assumptions, based on our best knowledge, but can go no further. We should remember that when inspired writers deal with historical incidents they relate that which they have seen or that which may have been told them, unless indeed the past is opened to them by revelation.”
    Elder John A. Widtsoe, Evidences and Reconciliations, p. 127
    “I have tried for a number of years to get the minds of the Saints prepared to receive the things of God; but we frequently see some of them, after suffering all they have for the work of God, will fly to pieces like glass as soon as anything comes that is contrary to their traditions.”
    Joseph Smith, Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith, p. 331
  4. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Just_A_Guy in Next Apostle   
    From what I can gather on Wikipedia, the last non-college-educated apostles were George Q. Morris (called 1954) and LeGrand Richards (called 1952)
     
    It's worth noting that the early apostles of Jesus' day, contrary to popular belief, may not have been quite the impoverished country bumpkins they have been made out to be.  Peter and Andrew's family were sufficiently well-to-do that they owned a fleet of fishing boats, and as I understand it Galilean fish were exported as far away as Rome (the remains of Peter's house in Capernaum still exist; and he had probably relocated there from Bethsaida for tax reasons).  Matthew, of course, was a tax collector--suggesting both literacy and some skill with mathematics--and James son of Alphaeus may have been his brother.  If I remember correctly, scholars have suggested that James and John's mother was one of a cadre of independently wealthy women who provided crucial financial support to the early church and its leaders.  Later prominent church leaders included Luke (a physician) and Paul (to all intents and purposes, a doctor of Jewish law).
  5. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Jane_Doe in Mission service: Culture, or canon?   
    "Is serving a mission culture or cannon?"
     
    Neither.  
     
    One should serve the Lord as the Lord Himself dictates, not by the pressure (positive or negative) of men.
  6. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Just_A_Guy in Prophecies of Presidents Monson & Hinckley   
    To the Boys and to the Men, from President Hinckley, in 1998, seems rather prophetic in hindsight even though Hinckley himself put things rather modestly:
     
  7. Like
    askandanswer reacted to prisonchaplain in Why my religion is right   
    … and yours is wrong!  I do not say that, nor do I mean it.  However, in today’s post-modern milieu it is almost an offense to even say, “I am a Christian.”  The simple statement is interpreted as a religious triumphalism, an arrogance, and an intolerance of all else.  Ironically, those most offended are not my fellow religionists, but the rising tide of “nones.”  Those who have no religion, or no organized religion, or who are “spiritual, but not religious,” or just who choose not to be bothered with such things, tend to be the ones who put a bite into the question, “Why is your religion right?”
    Still, the only way to answer the question is with innocence.  That is, as if the enquirer really wants to know.  I am a Christian because monotheism, universal appeal, and sacrificial love all strike as essential elements to a God that is real, and whom I would follow.  In today’s world, if God is not one then they are not all-powerful, all-knowing, and everywhere-present.  They are limited.  We shall, through invention and progress, eventually surpass them.  I would rather go about my life than be encumbered by demigods that just might bless me.
    Along the same track, if God is one, then does He care about us—about me?  If not, again, I would avoid him.  If God cares, would He not find a mechanism to show that care, and bring about interaction, that is all over the world.  He would not limit himself to a tribe or language.
    Finally, is God good?  I will not debate the presence of evil in the world today.  Rather, I look to the simple love story of Christianity.  God condescended to sending his Son, to become God-in-the-flesh.  A real, historical, human.  Jesus died so we could live.  What a love story!  No other God-story reads like that.  So, I prayed.  I believed.  Now I follow—a God who’s religion is universal, who is all-powerful, all-knowing, and everywhere-present.  The God who loves me.  That’s why I am a Christian.  That’s why I am right.
  8. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Why is quality interfaith dialogue so rare?   
    Its the fairly frequent opportunities to participate in discussions of this nature that make the Gospel Doctrine Sunday School class the favourite part of my Sunday church meetings. In my experience, the only difficulty in having good doctrinal discussions amongst church members during Sunday meetings is not a lack of willingness or any discomfort, but a regrettable lack of well informed viewpoints and a sometimes disappointingly shallow understanding of doctrine. Fortunately, in my ward, we also have many members with a great depth of gospel knowledge from whom I often learn.
  9. Like
    askandanswer reacted to pam in Banning sex offenders   
    What a suck up.  
  10. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Capitalist_Oinker in Moses   
    I don’t see a problem with this scripture.
    The Doctrine and Covenants explains that "the spirit of man [is] in the likeness of his person, as also the spirit of the beast; and every other creature which God has created" (D&C 77:2).
    That spirit bodies resemble physical bodies is demonstrated in the account of the premortal Jesus visiting the brother of Jared many centuries before Jesus' birth (Ether 3:9-16). On that occasion, the Lord revealed his spirit body and said, "this body, which ye now behold, is the body of my spirit; ...and even as I appear unto thee to be in the spirit will I appear unto my people in the flesh."
    So, Satan most assuredly does have teeth, just as every other spirit being has.
     
    We also learn in the D&C that: "There is no such thing as immaterial matter. All spirit is matter, but it is more fine or pure, and can only be discerned by purer eyes." (D&C 131:7)
     
    Satan's teeth are not immaterial, but made of matter; therefore he can no doubt gnash them if he has a mind to.
     
  11. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Bini in Old prophets VS new prophets   
    LDS doctrine could change virtually tomorrow if the President Monson received a new revelation today overturning current doctrine. Its not very likely, but it has, and can happen.
     
    As for the difference between commandments and doctrine, I like to think that commandments are instructions from God telling us what to do and what not to do whereas I see doctrine as knowledge/information/teachings. The fact that God has a body of flesh and bone, as tangible as man is doctrine and not a commandment. Thou shalt not kill is a commandment, and in the strict sense, not doctrine. However, many might see things differently and say that the commandments are part of our doctrine. 
  12. Like
    askandanswer reacted to prisonchaplain in Lots of questions   
    Just a thought from the non-LDS parent on the board--maybe you could agree with your mother to read a book co-authored by an Evangelical professor (with Baptist-like leanings) and one from Brigham Young University (LDS)?  The book is:  How Wide the Divide:  A Mormon and an Evangelical in Conversation, by Blomberg and Robinson.  The book covers major doctrines (salvation, scripture and revelation, the nature of God, etc.) and is pretty straight forward.  The authors are learned, fair-minded, kind, but they do not brush differences under the rug.  It should give you and your mother a better understanding of each other, without either of you having to read stuff that's mean-spirited and harsh. 
     
    Amazon has it used for .01 ($4 delivered):  http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0830819916/ref=sr_1_1_twi_1_pap_olp?ie=UTF8&qid=1431999165&sr=8-1&keywords=how+wide+the+divide
  13. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Average Joe in Lots of questions   
    You've been baptized and given the gift of the Holy Ghost, learn to follow positive impressions and the Holy Ghost will guide you. You also know about prayer, go to your Heavenly Father about the things weighing on your heart. Wait after you pray and ponder any impressions you receive. Write them down and ponder and pray about them throughout your day. Prayer is rarely a once and done thing but as you continue to ponder and pray the answer should become clear in your mind. Once you have your answer, do it (walk by faith). Personal revelation from your Heavenly Father is the best advice you can ever be given. Good luck! :) 
  14. Like
    askandanswer reacted to estradling75 in Lots of questions   
    For number 1:  We don't know your parents(mom) like you do... any detailed advice would be guess work..  In a more general sense realize that your actions and behaviors with them will be seen as "Mormon" once they know.  Every negative word or action you take will be seen by them as the "Mormon corruption" on you.  So please step up and be your best self.  After all that is really the best way to get them to accept your choice is by seeing the positive impact in has on you.
     
    For question 2:   Typically the Order is Limited Use Recommend (for baptisms for the Dead), Patriarchal Blessing, Full Temple Endowment, then Mission.
     
    Time wise there is some flexibility.   A Full Temple Endowment is at least a year after baptism, and a Mission only after the Temple Endowment.  Patriarchal Blessings are very flexible time wise.  You could wait months and still be in the typical pattern.
     
    That being said your being prepared is the most important thing rather than following a pattern.  Your leaders can help guide you, his mentioning of it was probably to get you to start thinking about it and preparing yourself 
  15. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Average Joe in Does Christ know the exact time when He will return?   
    I have always believed there was wiggle room in the timeline of the second coming. Abraham bargained to save Gomorrah according to the number of righteous found. In the BoM a city had been spared because of the prayers of the righteous. Once the wicked slew the righteous time was automatically up. Hezekiah had his life extended. The sun was made to stand still so Joshua could win a battle. The problem for the wicked is at some point the Father gets to say "Enough." despite the pleading prayers of the saints and the intervention / mediation on our behalf by Christ.  
     
    I believe Christ was given agency on the cross to chose the precise moment of his death in order to become our mediator with the Father. I believe the Father will use his agency to decide when enough is enough before the millennium just like when the war in Heaven occurred and that Christ will carry out the Father's will just as he has submitted his will to the Father's in all things.
     
    But that's just my opinion. 
  16. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Vort in Revelation   
    So I guess the idea that the LDS church has living prophets is interesting to me.  Would the LDS church ever recognized someone like Baha'u'llah as a prophet?
     
    This question sounds a little like the question to which Doctrine and Covenants 49 is the answer. 
     
    Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet to Sidney Rigdon, Parley P. Pratt, and Leman Copley, at Kirtland, Ohio, May 7, 1831. Leman Copley had embraced the gospel but still held to some of the teachings of the Shakers (United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing), to which he had formerly belonged. Some of the beliefs of the Shakers were that Christ’s Second Coming had already occurred and that He had appeared in the form of a woman, Ann Lee. They did not consider baptism by water essential. They rejected marriage and believed in a life of total celibacy. Some Shakers also forbade the eating of meat. In prefacing this revelation, Joseph Smith’s history states, “In order to have [a] more perfect understanding on the subject, I inquired of the Lord, and received the following.” The revelation refutes some of the basic concepts of the Shaker group. The aforementioned brethren took a copy of the revelation to the Shaker community (near Cleveland, Ohio) and read it to them in its entirety, but it was rejected.
     
    See also Section 43: 1 - 5
     
     1 O hearken, ye elders of my church, and give ear to the words which I shall speak unto you.
      2 For behold, verily, verily, I say unto you, that ye have received a commandment for a law unto my church, through him whom I have appointed unto you to receive commandments and revelations from my hand.  3 And this ye shall know assuredly—that there is none other appointed unto you to receive commandments and revelations until he be taken, if he abide in me.  4 But verily, verily, I say unto you, that none else shall be appointed unto this gift except it be through him; for if it be taken from him he shall not have power except to appoint another in his stead.  5 And this shall be a law unto you, that ye receive not the teachings of any that shall come before you as revelations or commandments; 
     
    On the other hand, Doctrine and Covenants 28, which deals with alternative and false sources of "revelation" seems to limit the Prophet's exclusive right to receive revelation only for the church, which perhaps opens the door to the possibility of others receiving revelation not for the church.
     
    Section 28Revelation given through Joseph Smith the Prophet to Oliver Cowdery, at Fayette, New York, September 1830. Hiram Page, a member of the Church, had a certain stone and professed to be receiving revelations by its aid concerning the upbuilding of Zion and the order of the Church. Several members had been deceived by these claims, and even Oliver Cowdery was wrongly influenced thereby. Just prior to an appointed conference, the Prophet inquired earnestly of the Lord concerning the matter, and this revelation followed.1–7, Joseph Smith holds the keys of the mysteries, and only he receives revelations for the Church; 8–10, Oliver Cowdery is to preach to the Lamanites; 11–16, Satan deceived Hiram Page and gave him false revelations.
     1 Behold, I say unto thee, Oliver, that it shall be givenunto thee that thou shalt be heard by the church in allthings whatsoever thou shalt teach them by the Comforter,concerning the revelations and commandments which Ihave given.
     2 But, behold, verily, verily, I say unto thee, no one shallbe appointed to receive commandments and revelations in this church excepting my servant Joseph Smith, Jun., for he receiveth them even as Moses.
  17. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Anddenex in Combining boys and girls in Valiant 10/11 class?   
    Since I have been married this class has always been together, co-ed.  Not sure the need, and definitely not mandated within the Church Handbook of Instructions.
     
    We don't split 12/13 (14/15, or 16/17) Sunday School classes; however, if there were enough boys and enough girls and enough teachers, this is really a call by the bishopric and primary president.
     
    I see more an added benefit to have them together as the class is pertaining to gospel doctrines, which are not gender specific.
  18. Like
    askandanswer reacted to Sunday21 in Feeling down.   
    I stopped watching tv about 10 years ago because so much is inappropriate. I feel that we all need the Spirit to navigate our lives. We need to be open to promptings to make the right decisions and to protect our families. We need the Spirit to serve in our callings and to do our visiting/home teaching. We need the Spirit to help us juggle our religious, work and family responsibilities. If the Lord of the Universe is prepared to counsel me on the appropriate way to deal with a difficult family member, I would have to be crazy to interfere with my ability to hear His advice. I bear this in mind when choosing what movie to watch!
  19. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from mordorbund in Decided to pray to God to change my mind   
  20. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Sojourn in our choice in the pre-existence   
    This might be a helpful clarification on whether there was one plan or two. 
     
    Bruce R. McConkie
    One of the saddest examples of a misconceived and twisted knowledge of an otherwise glorious concept is the all-too-common heresy that there were two plans of salvation; that the Father (presumptively at a loss to know what to do) asked others for proposals; that Christ offered a plan involving agency and Lucifer proposed a plan denying agency; that the Father chose between them; and that Lucifer, his plan being rejected, rebelled, and then there was war in heaven.
    Even a cursory knowledge of the overall scheme of things reassures spiritually discerning persons that all things center in the Father; that the plan of salvation which he designed was to save his children, Christ included; and that neither Christ nor Lucifer could of themselves save anyone. As Jesus said: 'The Son can do nothing of himself. . . . I can of mine own self do nothing.' (John 5:19,30)
    There is, of course, a sense in which we may refer to Lucifer's proposed modifications of the Father's plan as Lucifer's plan, and Christ made the Father's plan his own by adoption. But what is basically important in this respect is to know that the power to save is vested in the Father, and that he originated, ordained, created, and established his own plan; that he announced it to his children; and that he then asked for a volunteer to be the Redeemer, the Deliverer, the Messiah, who would put the eternal plan of the Eternal Father into eternal operation. (The Mortal Messiah, pp. 48-49 n.3) DGSM:15
  21. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Backroads in Decided to pray to God to change my mind   
    As long as any future husband/partner is attracted more to you than he is to anyone else, his attraction to others shouldn't be too much of a problem.
  22. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from NightSG in Decided to pray to God to change my mind   
    As long as any future husband/partner is attracted more to you than he is to anyone else, his attraction to others shouldn't be too much of a problem.
  23. Like
    askandanswer reacted to lagarthaaz in coming back to church. where to start?   
    I second what Palerider said, have a sit-down with your bishop.  You don't have to feel so different or unworthy - most of us in the church have had our challenges to overcome, and nobody is ever as 'perfect' as they may come across.
     
    Remember church is a hospital for sinners, as well as a haven for saints. 
     
    Just start going to meetings and eventually some faces will become familiar, you'll catch each other's eye and smile and nod and you will start to feel less alone there. Also give your RS President a call and ask if there are any mother's groups where you can meet other young mothers with children. In my ward the mums with young children take turns meeting at each other's houses once a week for playdates. It's an  opportunity to socialize and share with women of a similar age with young children.   Have you thought about having the missionaries over for a meal or to give a family home evening lesson? They can bring a special spirit into your home that may touch you and your husband and motivate you to continue striving to return to activity in the church. 
     
    Good luck, let us know what happens!   
  24. Like
    askandanswer reacted to prisonchaplain in Baltimore riots   
    One solution--perhaps only a small portion of the answer--is for even more to answer the call to law enforcement chaplaincy.  BTW, that's not what I am.  My area is corrections.  The dark side--inside the walls.  Law enforcement chaplains are volunteer.  They go through training, and usually ride with police, or fire fighters.  They help with death and serious accident notifications.  They become accepted, over time, as part of the department.  From a secular standpoint, they do help many officers remember that theirs is a high calling.  There is also the sense of support, even if the chaplain is never approached.  Frankly, they remind our protectors that the Almighty is present.  Such may not prevent all abuse, but a greater presence would be a greater help.
  25. Like
    askandanswer got a reaction from Jane_Doe in Married in a week   
    Hi Ophelia, it's been a a little over a week now and I'm just wondering how things ended up?