If you were not LDS what religion would you be?


omegaseamaster75

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Of course, as people who don't understand the calling to Catholic Priesthood and the lives of priests, our gut reaction is for immediate justice, reparation, and even vengeance.  To hell with redemption of his black soul, sexual abuse demands that he be legally prosecuted, publicly hanged if it was still the norm, or getting stabbed to death in prison will do in a pinch.  Serves him right for the monster that he is.  People have a long way to go in learning the lesson of the casting of the first stones.

 

I wouldn't go that far (well, I would with some sexual abusers, but not all of them), but yes, they should face temporal punishment for a temporal crime.

 

If a priest is sexually abusing someone, that's a crime against a person, full stop. The justice system shouldn't give them a bye just because they're working in a religious occupation. Could you imagine if the U.S. Department of Justice simply said, "Naw, we won't pursue Warren Jeffs's wrongdoings; the guy was just fulfilling an ordinance of the church he leads"? (I know Warren Jeffs isn't a Latter-Day Saint, but I'm just holding him up as an example.)

 

The LDS faith has had some sexual scandals, but not on the level that Roman Catholicism has had, and I think we have better safeguards against it. For starters, we have the 12th Article of Faith; Mormons who commit these crimes don't get to run from the law (or, if they do, they don't get the church's help).

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Whatever my parents were, that's probably the church I would belong to. I most likely would not be a practicing member, but I would just identify myself with it. I think I would still believe in God, but I probably wouldn't believe that I need to worship Him in church--just a belief would suffice.

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The LDS faith has had some sexual scandals, but not on the level that Roman Catholicism has had, and I think we have better safeguards against it. For starters, we have the 12th Article of Faith; Mormons who commit these crimes don't get to run from the law (or, if they do, they don't get the church's help).

 

They don't get to run away from the law in the Catholic Church either... but the Catholic Church tries to make sure that the priest is on the path of repentance before they get thrown into secular society's justice system.  And that's where the problem is.  Because, in countries like the Philippines, the government is just fine with allowing the Catholic Church to police themselves whereas in countries like the US, they will not give the Catholic Church even the modicrum of allowance to work with the priest to prepare him for secular judgement before he gets into the court systems and the hungry media... but the Church's position on repentance applies to the entire church worldwide.

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From my personal quest for truth I have been very impressed in Buddhism.  Historically it is the only religion that I have studied that during its early years of expansion that it introduced itself to war ravaged countries spreading peace and prosperity - including a climate of technological advances .  I find the current writings of philosophers like Ken Wilber (example "The Marriage of Sense and Soul - Integrating Science and Religion") one of the great messages in a sensible quest for balance in spirituality and empirical studies for our modern times. 

 

In contrast early Christianity spreading through Europe brought war, destruction and what we call "The Dark Ages" - killing more men, women and children than the Black Plague and setting back human understanding and technology over a thousand years.   Introducing Christianity in to the Americas brought slavery, genocide and inexcusable oppression of native populations - In the USA for example it is estimated that there were over 50 million native population prior to the introduction of Traditional Christianity - today there is less than 4 million. 

 

I am sorry but from what I have learned and observed - Traditional Christianity has so adamantly encased and redefined itself in the "Great Apostasy" - opposing new and different ideas with such bazaar and foolish elitism, that I cannot, in good conscience, come to much of any respect of such traditions than to feel regret for those over ran by such traditions.  And great respect for the the few that have risen above such traditions and undefinable doctrines to make themselves at peace with others in a society and era of turmoil - both in regards to ideas and social interactions.

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From my personal quest for truth I have been very impressed in Buddhism.  Historically it is the only religion that I have studied that during its early years of expansion that it introduced itself to war ravaged countries spreading peace and prosperity - including a climate of technological advances .  I find the current writings of philosophers like Ken Wilber (example "The Marriage of Sense and Soul - Integrating Science and Religion") one of the great messages in a sensible quest for balance in spirituality and empirical studies for our modern times. 

 

In contrast early Christianity spreading through Europe brought war, destruction and what we call "The Dark Ages" - killing more men, women and children than the Black Plague and setting back human understanding and technology over a thousand years.   Introducing Christianity in to the Americas brought slavery, genocide and inexcusable oppression of native populations - In the USA for example it is estimated that there were over 50 million native population prior to the introduction of Traditional Christianity - today there is less than 4 million. 

 

I am sorry but from what I have learned and observed - Traditional Christianity has so adamantly encased and redefined itself in the "Great Apostasy" - opposing new and different ideas with such bazaar and foolish elitism, that I cannot, in good conscience, come to much of any respect of such traditions than to feel regret for those over ran by such traditions.  And great respect for the the few that have risen above such traditions and undefinable doctrines to make themselves at peace with others in a society and era of turmoil - both in regards to ideas and social interactions.

 

Really???  Wow.

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Guest LiterateParakeet

Great thread.  I think if I were to choose another Christian denomination, I consider Presbyterian, because of the influence of a podast by Pastor Ernie Hess.

 

 

Outside of Christianity, I'm sure I'd be Buddhist. 

 

 

From my personal quest for truth I have been very impressed in Buddhism.  

 

 

Outside of Christianity, Buddhist is high on my list too.  I just  started reading the Places That Scare You by Pema Chodron, a Buddhist Nun, and it is so beautiful.  Consider this:

 

"Bodhichitta is also equated, in part with compassion--our ability to feel the pain that we share with others.  Without realizing it we continually shield ourselves from this pain because it scares us.  We put up protective walls made of opinions, prejudices and strategies, barriers that are built on a deep fear of being hurt.  These walls are further fortified by emotions of all kinds: anger, craving, indifference, jealousy and envy, arrogance and pride.  But fortunately for us, the soft spot--our innate ability to love and to care about things--is like a crack in these walls we erect. It's a natural opening in the barriers we create when we're afraid.  With practice we can learn to find this opening.  We can learn to seize that vulnerable moment--love, gratitude, loneliness, embarrassment, inadequacy--to awaken bodhichitta"

 

What is Bodhichitta?  She says: "Chitta means 'mind' and also 'heart' or attitude'.  Bodhi means 'awake,' 'enlightened,' or 'completely open.'" 

 

So beautiful.

 

I am also reminded of another delightful book called Mudhouse Sabbath, about a Christian woman who was previously Jewish.  In Mudhouse Sabbath she shares somethings (cultural mostly) that she misses about Judaism.  It was also beautiful, in different ways.  

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If I was not LDS, how would I be? Well, that's a non-question for me. I'm not LDS, and I am what I am. If that's too simple, for y'all, consider this. There is what I think is Christian. There is what they think is Christian. There is what I think what they think is Christian. There is what they think what I think is Christian. There is what I think they think what I think is Christian. There is what they think I think what they think is Christian. And it goes on and on, ad infinitum.

 

I like simpliciity, so I just stick with what I think, informed as I find enlightened, with what they think.

 

That makes me a non-denominational Christian, with an open mind for wisdom, whatever it's provenance. It's not an original, or revolutionary, thought, but I commend it to you. Through it, I've found both self-respect and respect for others, and a road to a sufficiency of contentedness.

 

Best wishes, 2RM.

Edited by 2ndRateMind
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I'd be a Jesuit for sure.

 

When my son would act up (which was rare, fortunately), I would often shake my head and tell him, "I should have sent you to

the Jesuits."  I went to Catholic school for 12 years and knew guys who went to the Jesuit prep schools. Just like the Marines, they will make a man out of you. : )

 

I might try being Episcopalian - I think the only thing they require of you is that you read the Washington Post or NY Times on Sunday while you have a nice brunch. You may also need to know how to set a formal table and which fork to use for the olives.

Edited by dahlia
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I will add an additional thought - What ever truth I can find - wherever I can find it - it is my mission and purpose to make it my own.  If I could find a way, a church, a priesthood, covenants, a people and a society more dedicated to truth and embracing truth as an continuing (eternal) construct more than the LDS - I would embrace it in a heart beat.  I am LDS because I have searched and continue to search and have found nothing so open and dedicated to truth and bringing and allowing all to embrace the principles of truth as well (some individual excepted - as always).

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